B

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • b', ba, ber, b'o', bur
     /ba/. Also bra. [Atlantic; from brother, but cf. also Brit. dial. East bor, bo' term of familiar address applied to either sex and of all ...
  • babe
    [Car.; OED, baby ... literary and poetic; colloq. pretty girl] n. a term of endearment (also applied to children, men, etc.): Hey, babe, wha's happenin'? ...
  • baby
    [OED, formerly synonymous with child; now usually restricted to an infant in arms] n. a child up to approximately five years of age. ...
  • baby pepper
     [ etym?] n. a plant, Rivina humilis, with white flowers and red stems: 1972 (Durrell 84). (San Sal.) ...
  • back
    adv. 1. [Car.; DJE "often used pleonastically"] used redundantly for emphasis: 1918 He will return back (Parsons 133). Reverse the car back (Exuma). 2. [Car.] ...
  • back
    n. 1. [euphemism] bladder; ability to hold one's urine: 1904 To strengthen babies' backs (i.e. kidneys) and keep them from wetting their beds, give them ...
  • back
    prep. [from use of the adverb without a locative preposition] in, on (a town or island one has left): She live back Long Island. (Gen.) ...
  • back
    v. 1. [Car.; from Brit. dial. back to carry on one's back EDD; US dial. idem DARE] to carry on one's back: He too heavy ...
  • backa-do'
    See TOBACCO DOVE. ...
  • back-answer
    [Car.; from the noun W3] v. to reply impertinently: That boy would back-answer his daddy. (Gen.) ...
  • back aside
    [from a combination of back up and step aside] v. phr. to step back; to move out of the way: Boy, back aside and let ...
  • back-back
    [Car.; from back (up) v. + back adv.; both separable and inseparable: cf. Gul. backin' de gig back (Parsons 1923:78), US dial. North He backed ...
  • back breaker
    n. (in wrestling) holding someone across one's back, with one arm around his leg and the other around his neck, then applying pressure. (Andros) ...
  • back-land
    [US lands lying behind the more settled or accessible areas DAB] n. the area inland from a coastal town; the interior of an island. = ...
  • back down
    v. phr. to move over (on a bench to make room for another). (Andros, Eleu.) ...
  • back country
    [US in reference to the 'backs' of colonies facing the Atlantic Ocean DAE 1755 n. the area inland from a coastal town; the interior of ...
  • back-house
    n. I. [US a house behind the main building DAE] a thatched hut for cooking behind the main house. (Mayag., Inagua) 2. [US dial. idem ...
  • back of the bush
    [cf. BUSH 1 forest] n. phr. deep in the forest, away from other settled areas: Haitians are usually found in the back of the bush. (Black) ...
  • back-of-the-yard
    [cf. US back yard idem DAE] n. phr. the area behind a house: 1936 Why y' don' lemmuh go back in de back o' d' ...
  • back street, back road, back corner
    [cf. US back street a street lying in a back area or running behind the main buildings in a town; back road a road, esp. ...
  • back-talk
    [E Car.; from the noun DAE] v.t. to talk to someone impertinently: Don't you back-talk me! (Gen.) ...
  • back trunk
    n. (of a car) trunk or boot: I's always tell mama put all a we bag in the back trunk (Nassau). ...
  • back-up wife
    [cf. back-up in reserve] n. one's wife at home in contrast to an unofficial one elsewhere. (Nassau) ...
  • backaways
    [W Car.; Brit. dial. North idem EDD, US dial. idem ADD] adv. backwards. (Black) ...
  • back-yard
    [Belize large posterior (Dayley 1979)] n. buttocks (not necessarily large). (Nassau) ...
  • bacons: have a lot of bacons
    have a lot of bacons [cf. OED to sell one's bacon, i.e. one's flesh or body; DAB to save one's bacon to save one's flesh ...
  • bad
    adv. [Atlantic; an African calque: cf. Mandingo A ka nyi ko-jugu (lit. It is good badly) It is very good (Dalby 1972:177) or Shona zvakáipa ...
  • bad-bad
    [W Car.; from bad + reduplication cf. Yoruba burukuburuku (lit. bad-bad) very bad(ly) (Oyedeji p.c.)] adj. very bad; of the very worst kind: She bad-bad—don't ...
  • bad-behaving
    adj. of children: unruly. (Black) ...
  • bad-belly
    [Car.; a calque; cf. Yoruba inu mi kò dara (lit. belly my not good) My stomach is upset (Oyedeji p.c.)] n. phr. abdominal illness: 1918 B'o' ...
  • bad blood
    n. 1. [from association with the Wasser-man blood test] syphilis (Dupuch p.c.) 2. [cf. Ibo mea jonjo (lit. blood bad) idem (Okolo p.c.)] in the ...
  • badder
    [Car.; cf. BAD; OED, obs. comparative of bad, US dial. idem ADD] adj. worse: He badder dan you, boy (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • bad enough
    /bad nof/ [Car.] adj. phr. dangerously ill: From what I see she bad 'nuff—she was just coughing and sneezing up a breeze (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • bad feeling(s)
    [Car.] n. 1. nausea, especially with a headache and cold sweat and general malaise. 2. the bad feeling(s) morning sickness: She get the bad feelin's. ...
  • badge
    /baj/ n. I. [from barge /bahj/?] a sea pen for keeping conchs alive.= CRAWL (Grand Bah., San Sal.) 2. [from batch] a batch, as of ...
  • bad hair
    [Car.; cf. Car. Sp. "pelo calificado de malo de negro" (Alvarez Nazario 1974:358); from obsolete value system in which things African were bad and things ...
  • bad-head
    [a calque; cf. HEAD (IS) NOT GOOD] adj. forgetful; stupid; mentally unstable: 1936 Dat bad-head woman on d' radio name Gracie Allen (Dupuch 23). (Black) ...
  • bad-lucked
    /bad lókid/ [Car.] adj. unlucky: She so bad-lucked she even can't find a job (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • bad minded
    [Atlantic] adj. evil-minded; suspecting the worst; malevolent: They don't trust him, 'cause he bad-minded (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • bad-mouth
    /bad mawt/ v. [Gul. idem; calque from e.g. Vai da na ma, lit., a bad mouth, i.e. a curse (Turner 1948:7) or Mandingo da-jugu or ...
  • bad out there
    [cf. BAD good] phr. You're looking good (i.e. well-dressed, etc.). (youth slang): Boy, you look bad out there—I take you for model (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • bad-talk
    [W Car.; cf. BAD-MOUTH idem] v.t. to slander; to verbally abuse. (Eleu.) ...
  • baggages
    [from standard mass noun + -s] n. pl. (count noun) pieces of baggage: She done take all her baggages with her (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • baggy
    [cf. US trade name Baggies, small plastic bags for storing food] n. a small plastic bag filled with frozen flavored sugar-water, usually sold in the ...
  • Bahama
    n. 1. [see BAHAMAS] Obs. the former name of Grand Bahama: 1786 Bahama, from which the rest of these islands take their name, is seated ...
  • Bahama bamboo
    [from the resemblance of its tall flowering spine to bamboo; cf. BAMBOO POLE idem] n., Obs. a variety of cactus, Agave rigida: 1835 hemp manufactured ...
  • Bahama boa
    n. a constrictor snake, Elaplze sp.: 1972 The harmless Bahama boa ... sometimes reaches six or seven feet in length (Durrell 71). ...
  • Bahama coney
    [cf. OED cony rabbit, akin to Sp. conejo, now largely obs.; note 1555 quot.: "Connies whiche they caule Vtias"] n., obs. the hutia (Geocapromys ingrahami), ...
  • Bahama ham, Bahamian ham
    n. 1. [see quot.] the bonefish: 1888 The bonefish, nicknamed the Bahama ham on account of a supposed resemblance in flavour (Powles 279). (Exuma) 2. ...
  • Bahama money, Bahama currency
    n., Obs. a system of pounds and pence used in the 18th and 19th centuries, worth roughly half the value of sterling: 1788 A Spanish ...
  • Bahaman
    [not in W3] adj., n., Obs., Bahamian (largely replaced by the latter): 1895 Fish is to the Bahaman what meat is to the Englishman (Edwards ...
  • Bahamas
    [see the usage note] n. the Bahama Islands (considered to lie outside the West Indies by most Bahamians): 1976 The way of life in America, ...
  • Bahama sparrow
    n., Obs. a bird, possibly the gray and yellow Bahama honeycreeper, Coereba flaveola: 1731 Bahama sparrow. . . about the size of a Canary Bird. ...
  • Bahama white-wood bark
    n. the wild cinnamon tree, Canella winterana: 1889 (Gardner 365). 1978 Small tree. . . cinnamon-like odour. . . known locally as Bahama white-wood bark ...
  • Bahamian
    /bahéymian ; bahámian (Anglophile); bahíymian (Black)/ n. 1. a native of the Bahamas: 1731 The hungry Bahamians (Catesby II:i). 2. the creolized English of the ...
  • Baheemian
    See BAHAMIAN (pronunciation) ...
  • Bajan taste
    /béyjan teys/ [cf. OEDS II Badian, Bajan Barbadian] n. a style of heavy upholstered furniture: 1966 (Crowley 98). ...
  • bake
    [W. Car.; OED "primarily used of preparing bread, potatoes, apples, the flesh of animals; thus, in the primary sense, distinguished from roast"; Brit. dial. North ...
  • baker
    /béyka/ [W Car.; cf. Brit. dial. West baker griddle (Orton L36), US dial. idem cast-iron oven DARE] n. I. the oven in a gas or ...
  • Baker('s) cake
    [cf. Brit. dial. North, Mid, baker's bread bread made by a baker as distinguished from bread made at home EDD] n. a large, flat, crisp ...
  • bake-thing
    /beyk ting/ [W Car.] n. baked goods, such as bread, pastry, cakes, etc. (Black) ...
  • bakimba
    /bakímba/ [from to stand akimbo: "To rest one's hands on the hips, keeping the elbows square, and sticking out from the body; an insolent, bullying ...
  • balance off
    [cf. OED balance of partners in dancing: to move to and fro in converse direc-tions like the arms of a balance 1775] v. phr. of ...
  • balao
    /baláw/ [cf. Puerto Rican Sp. balaju ballyhoo fish, of same genus WFF] n. a beaked fish, Hemiramphus balao. (Exuma, Inagua) ...
  • bald blenny
    n. a fish, Paraclinus infrons: 1968 (Böhlke 520). (Exuma) ...
  • ball
    n. 1. [Gul. idem (Parsons 1923:94); OED, balls fired from small arms are also called bullets] bullet. (San Sal.) 2. [cf. Scots ball a spree ...
  • baller
    [cf. BALL 2 and OED obs., baller one who takes part in a ball; note also "Balum Rancum. A hop or dance, where the women ...
  • ball-head
    /bóhl ed/ [Atlantic; from bald (with simplification of final consonant cluster, possibly with converging influence from ball sphere) + head] adj. 1. bald: Our preacher, ...
  • ballon gut
    [from its ability to distend its body when alarmed] n. the swellfish, Diodon holocanthus. (Andros) ...
  • balloon vine
    [etym?] n. a plant, Cardiospermum halicacabum: 1910 (Northrop 166). (Eleu.) ...
  • ball-plate
    [cf. OED, DJE bald-pate, a different sp.] n. the American widgeon, Mareca americana, a black bird with a white head. (Nassau) ...
  • ball-plated
    [W Car.; from bald-pated by folk etym.] adj. bald: 1918 Jack saw his head was bal'-plated and he say, "0 Mr. King! I could make ...
  • ball up
    [from balled wadded together] adj. of skirts or trousers that are too large: bulkily tucked in around the waist: He haddy ball up he pants ...
  • ballyhoo
    /balihúw, baliyúw/ [W Car.; from Puerto Rican Sp. balajit idem WFF] n. a beaked fish, Hemiramphus brasiliensis: 1968 (BollIke 124). (Gen.) ...
  • balm
    [OED idem arch.] v. to embalm (a corpse): 1980 (Dorsett 13). (Nassau) ...
  • Bamakansa
    [cf. Kongo bama to scold + kanza to bite (Turner 1949:58, 105)] n., Obs? the name of a folk tale character: 1918 The tale had ...
  • bamboo
    (Andros, Long); bamboo mast, bamboo raft (Andros); bamboo pole (Inagua); bamboo sisal (San Sal., Mayag.); bamboo tree (Adelaide) [from the resemblance of its tall flowering ...
  • bamboo shaker
    [cf. SHAKER musical rattle] n. a kind of rattle: 1975 A piece of bamboo tree trunk with a natural stopper and a cork stopper at ...
  • bamsookie
    /bamsúki/ [etym?; cf. Jam. bam sukey sound suggesting a sudden action DJE] n. a word or action which effectively ends an encounter: 1940 Put d' ...
  • banana bird
    [W Car, different sp.] n. 1. a bird, the banana quit or honeyereeper (Coereba flaveola): 1880 Banana bird. . . Bahama Honey Creeper (Cory 76). ...
  • banana hole
    (Gen.), banana bottom (Mayag.) [from agricultural use; see quot.] n. a deep, natural hole found in limestone: 1889 [a plant] abundant near Banana holes (Gardner ...
  • banana spider
    [W. Car.; often found among bananas DJE] n. a large spider, Heteropoda venatoria, resembling the tarantula, usually called GROUND SPIDER. (Exuma) ...
  • banana tree
    in the phrase: People don't kill banana tree; banana tree kill theyself: People create their own problems. (Black) ...
  • banana water
    [W Car.] n. the water in which bananas have been boiled, drunk as a beverage. (Black) ...
  • banalong
    /béyngalohng/ [cf. W Car. bangarang noise, disturbance DJE; cf. Wolof baŋka, Hausa baŋke to collide (Turner 1949:60) perhaps converging with Eng. echoic forms bang, ting-a-ling] ...
  • bang-bang
    [from a reduplication of bang, perhaps converging with similar African echoic words for striking, e.g. Twi bàm or Hausa bam DJE] intj. the sound of ...
  • banister porch
    [cf. BANISTER RAILING] n. a porch with a railing: 1966 I jump right here on this bannister porch (Crowley 113). (Black) ...
  • banister (railing)
    [cf. OED banister railing on stairs but cf. 1776 quot. "A neat altar-piece, inclosed with rails and banisters") n. the railing on a porch or ...
  • banja(h), banjer
    /bánja/ [in US /bánjow/ but cf. South, Black /bánja/ (Stanley 1941:10); from "kiMbundu mbanza stringed musical instrument (whence also Jam, banja and Brazilian Port, banza) ...
  • bank up
     v. phr. to save (money): He banking up he money to go off to school (Nassau). (Gen.) ...
  • banny-sinkle
    (Andros); boungy-sticker or panny-sinky. (Nassau) [origin uncertain, but cf. Sar. asiíka, small crab, and folk etymology; cf. also Pap. panekrab crab (Hoyer 27) and Am. ...
  • bantin
    [cf. bandy and US dial. banty bow-legged ADD] adj. bandy-legged: His legs bantin (San Sal.).  —n. the hip: Stop clappin' ya bantin at me (Cat).  ...
  • bant-leg
    (Andros); ban-leg (Eleu.) [cf. BANTIN] adj. bandy-legged. ...
  • bap
    [W Car.; echoic] intj. imitating the sound of a sharp blow: 1940 He bump he head on d' wall "Bap!" (Dupuch 92). ...
  • bar: come over the bar
    [alluding to a sand bar (now removed) in Nassau harbor] v. phr. to come from abroad: 1940 Dey trus' enybuddy who come over d' Bar ...
  • barefoot rice
    [cf. Scots dial. barefoot broth broth made with butter and vegetables, without any meat EDD, and US dial. barefoot tea without cream or sugar ADD] ...
  • bar jack
    [from markings?] n. a fish, Caranx ruber: 1968 (Böhlke 330). (Black) ...
  • bark
    n. [OED, the rind, husk, or shell of fruit and grains obs. → 1661] the husk of a coconut: 1978 Remove inner bark from any ...
  • bark of the tree
    n. phr. the lower trunk, especially of a large tree with big roots. (Exuma) ...
  • barks
    n. pl. 1. pieces of bark. (Andros, Eleu.) 2. husks of coconuts: Carvings made from coconut barks. (Nassau) ...
  • barn (house)
    n. 1. [cf. US dial. South barn small shed with a feedroom and a single stall (Brown 1976)] a small back shed, used for storage, ...
  • barraco
    /bárakow/ [from the port of Baracoa, Cuba opposite Inagua?] n. a variety of pineapple having very large eyes. (Eleu.) ...
  • barracuta
    /barakúwta/; barracouti /barakúwti/ [W. Car.; from standard Sp. barracuda (but note Honduran Sp. baracuta WFF); cf. OED barracoota 1772] n. the barracuda, a large fish ...
  • barrent
    [from barren, by hypercorrection of final consonant cluster (cf, wan' want)] adj. (of women) infertile: I hear say she barrent—das why she ain't got no ...
  • barrout
    /baráwt/ [Atlantic; cf. Scots bethout without CSD with rhotacism of /t, d/] prep. without: 1970 Dey. . . gone de whole nite barrout one wink ...
  • barry
    /bári/ [cf. BARRACUTA] n. the barracuda fish, Sphyraena barracuda. = BARRACUTA, COODA, HANGY (Black) ...
  • barsly
    See BASSLY. ...
  • bar-tender
    [from the n.] v. to tend bar: He was bar-tendering. (Nassau) ...
  • Barlett pear
    [US: a particular variety of pear named after Enoch Bartlett, its distributor] n. any variety of northern pear (Pyrus communis). = AMERICAN PEAR, FALSE PEAR ...
  • basket-head
    [cf. Kongo basa bedstead covered with a mat (Turner 1949:60) converging with basket, BEDHEAD] n. the head of a bedstead: 1904 Make the sign of ...
  • basket hoop
    [cf. Jam, basket hook a vine DJE and Bah. HOOK hoop] n. a plant, Croton lucidus: 1889 (Gardner 405). ...
  • basket wood
    [cf. US basket willow (Salix viminalis) DAE] n. a tree (sp?) whose twigs are used in weaving fish traps. (Nassau) ...
  • bass (1)
    bass drum (Gen.); bass guitar (San Sal.) /beys/ [from resemblance of sound to that of bass fiddle] n. a musical instrument, an over-turned washtub with ...
  • bass (2)
    /beys/ [Gul. idem (Writers' Program 1940: 42); cf. OED bass nonce word ... to utter or proclaim with a bass voice or sound 1610; probably ...
  • basser
    /béysa/ [cf. Scots baser a bass singer CSD and US Black baser responding line sung by a gospel group (Major)] n. a bass singer, especially ...
  • bassly
    /básli/ (Andros); barsly /bahsli/ (Mayag., Inagua); brassly /brásli (Andros), brázli (Mayag.)/ [cf. Jam. báazli (Ocimum micranthum); from basil influenced by PUSSLY ; cf. THISTLE]  n. ...
  • bastard
    OED applied to things resembling, but not identical with, the species that legitimately bears the name] attributive n. a tree (usually male) that does not ...
  • bastard buttonwood
    n. a tree, Laguncularia racemosa: 1910 (Northrop 171). (Black) ...
  • bastard crabwood
    n. a tree, Savia bahamensis: 1905 (Shattuck 257). = JOE-WOOD (Black) ...
  • bastard lignum vitae
    [DJE, W3 different sp.] n. a tree, Badiera domingensis: 1889 (Gardner 365). (Exuma, Inagua) ...
  • bastard pigeon plum
    n. a tree, Coccoloba swartzii, with small black fruit resembling pigeon plums: 1977 (Patterson 43). (Black) ...
  • bastard sago palm
    /bástad séya pahm/ n. a tree, Cycas revoluta: 1889 Bastard sago palm ... common in gardens . . . Pith furnishes a kind of sago (Gardner ...
  • bastard stopper
      [cf. STOPPER] n. a tree, Petitia domingensis: 1920 (Britton 373). = FOWL BERRY, PEPPER BERRY (Black) ...
  • bastard torch wood
    [cf. TORCH WOOD] n. a shrub, Ocotea coriacea: 1920 (Britton 143). = BLACK TORCH, SWEET TORCHWOOD (Exuma) ...
  • baste
    /beys/ [cf. 1811 DVT to beat] v. to beat (a person): 1918 He startin' lickin' his broder ... bastin' his broder (Parsons 32). (Eleu.) ...
  • bat
    [W Car.; cf. Irel. bat moth EDD] n. a large, dark moth of the family Noctuidae: When one of them bat come in the house, ...
  • batata
    /bateyta/ [cf. Sp., Port. batata sweet potato (from Taino)] n. potato. (Gen.) ...
  • bateau
    /bátow/ [Car.; from Fr. bateau boat] n. 1. a kind of flat-bottomed boat. (Gen.)  2. any small boat, up to about 8 feet. (San Sal.) ...
  • bathe your skin
    /beyd yu skin/ [Car.; cf. SKIN as quasi reflexive] v. phr. to take a bath or shower: 1918 My ol' fader . . carry him ...
  • bath suit
    /baht suwt/ [also Vir. (Roy 1974) and Belize idem (Dayley 1979] n. a bathing suit. (Nassau) ...
  • batter
    n. [cf. BATTER (UP)] a board used to batten up windows before a hurricane: the batters or shutters. (Nassau, San Sal.) -- v. especially in the ...
  • batty
    /báti/ [Atlantic; from bottom buttocks] n. the buttocks. (Eleu., Inagua) ...
  • batty-hole
    [Belize idem (Dayley 1979); from BATTY + hole] n. anus. (Nassau) ...
  • bay
    [Car.; from bay coastal recess, by semantic broadening possibly influenced by Port. beira shore] n. 1. beach: 1708 Amber-Greece is often washed up on the ...
  • bay arrangia
    /bey aréynja/ [from BAY GERINA by metathesis?] n. a vine (sp?) with small leaves. cf. BAY GERANIUM (Eleu.) ...
  • bay bean
    bay bean n. a plant, Canavalia bahamensis, which grows on the seashore and bears reddish-brown beans: 1885 The bay bean . . . is, it ...
  • bead vine
    [from the use of the seeds as beads] n. a plant, Abrus precatorius, with poisonous oval green seeds which become red with a black spot ...
  • bay crab
    bay crab n. a small white sand crab, Sesarnia ricordi? (Black) ...
  • bay geranium
     bay gerina /bey jaríyna/ (Black); bay gerinia (Exuma) n. a seashore vine, Ambrosia hispida: 1920 (Britton 432). = BAY TANSY, SOAP BUSH, WILD GERANIUM ...
  • bay hop
    [from resemblance to hops; by folk etym. from hop v. since children use the vine as a skipping rope] n. a seashore vine, Ipomea pes-caprae: ...
  • bay marigold
    n. a seashore plant, Borrichia arborescens, with yellow flowers: 1920 (Britton 450). = SEA BUSH (San Sal.) ...
  • bay plum
    n. a seashore shrub bearing black fruit, probably the COCO PLUM, Chrysobalanus icaco (San Sal.). (Black) ◊ Gardner (1889:389) identifies bay plum as the guava, ...
  • bay rush
    n. a seashore plant, Zamia angustifolia or Z. pumila: 1889 Bay rush . . . pith furnishes starch fit for food and for laundry purposes, ...
  • bay-side
    [Vir. idem (Roy 1974); US shore of a bay DAE] n. seashore; beach: 1966 Moray come up on the bay-side and eat (Crowley 106). (Black) ...
  • Bay Street Boys
    [from the name of Nassau's main commercial street] n. politically powerful white merchants of Nassau: 1962 (Craton ...
  • bay string
    [cf. STRING] n. a strip of bay grass (Eragrostis sp.) used to tie together conch, fish, etc. for sale. (Gen.) ...
  • bay tansy
    (Black); bay tanjy (Exuma) [cf. US tansy different sp. W3] n. a seashore vine, Ambrosia hispida: 1920 (Britton 432). = BAY GERANIUM, SOAP BUSH, WILD ...
  • bay thyme
    n. a seashore vine (sp?) with leaves resembling thyme. cf. BAY ARRANGIA (Andros, White) ...
  • bay vine
    [from habitat and form, but cf. /vayn/ to wind] n. a seashore vine, probably Ipomea pes-caprae. cf. BAY WINDERS, BAY HOP, BEACH MORNING GLORY, SEASIDE ...
  • bay winders
    [cf. BAY VINE] n. a seashore vine, Ipomea pes-caprae, with purple flowers resem-bling morning glories. = BAY HOP, BEACH MORNING GLORY cf. BAY VINE (Exuma, ...
  • bay wormwood
    n. a seashore shrub, Croton linearis: 1920 (Britton 223). = GRANNY BUSH (Inagua) ...
  • be (1)
    [Car., US Black; from use after iterative marker DOES, later lost (Rickford 1974:96ff.)] v. 1. to be (habitually): 1929 I goes down dere, no matter ...
  • be (2)
    [cf. Gul. Bro' Rabbit be look fo' see ef Bro' Wolf been a-comin' (Parsons 1923:40); from BE1 1] preverbal habitual marker 1. before simple verbs: ...
  • beach hawk
    [from habitat] n. a seashore bird of prey, Tyrannus intrepidus? (Black) ...
  • beaching: go beaching
    v. phr. to go to the beach, especially to go swimming: The sea is so close to the settlement that I could have gone beaching ...
  • beach up
    [cf. OED beach v.t. to run or haul (a vessel) up on the beach] v.i. of boats, fish, etc.: to be driven up on the ...
  • bead
    [OED seems to misinterpret following quot.] n., Obs? a strip of palmetto leaf: 1885 The sponges are strung upon small palmetto strips, three or four ...
  • Beagle
    n. nickname for a native of Cherokee Sound, Abaco. (White) ...
  • beans
    [Atlantic; from Eng. pl.] n. sing. or pl. bean; emphatic singular: one grain of beans. (Exuma) ...
  • beard
    [OED, barb of a fish-hook obs. → 1793] n. the prong of a fishing spear: Sometimes you strike a good fish, the beard does pull off ...
  • beastes
    /bíysaz/ [cf. Gul. beasties (Parsons 1923: 80), US Black beas's (Benardete 1932:362); from simplification of final consonant cluster to beas', then addition of post-sibilant plural ...
  • beat (1)
    [Car. also US Black (Loman 1967:6)] v. 1. to win (with competition rather than competitor as direct object): 1895 De one dat beat de race ...
  • beat (2)
    v. to strike, in the following phrases: beat around the bush [cf. US idiom and BUSH forest] phr. to live a hand-to-mouth existence with no ...
  • beater
    [OED, an instrument for beating] n. 1. a drumstick: 1975 (Russell 12). (Gen.) 2. a piece of wood used to hit clothes washed in a ...
  • beating jack
    n. a flying jackfish (Caranx sp.) which beats its tail on the surface of the water. (Gen.) ...
  • beauty
     [cf. DJE a beauty one, US colloq. the beauty part] adj. beautiful: Das very beauty. (Black) ...
  • beaver
    /biyva/; beeber /bíyba/ [Atlantic; cf. OED a hat made of beaver's fur → 1885; Scots beaver top hat CSD] n. 1. any felt hat with ...
  • be bo ben
    /biy bow ben/ (Black); boom ba den (Andros); ee bo ben, ee bee en (Eleu.); by bow ben /bay bow ben/ (Berry) [Car.; cf. US ...
  • bedding
    [Car.; OED, anything used to sleep on obs. → 1675; from such use] n. old, ragged clothes. (Gen.) ...
  • bedevil
    [cf. B' Devil, folk-tale character] n. the mole cricket, Gryllotalpa hexadactyla. (Crooked, San Sal.) ...
  • bed grass
    n. a soft grass, Andropogon glomeratus, dried and used to stuff mattresses: 1910 Passed through a tract covered with what the men called "bed grass", ...
  • bed head
     [Atlantic; cf. OED, the upper end of a bed] n. the headboard of a bedstead: Whenever I go sleep inside a Mama bed, my head ...
  • bedstead
    n. the headboard of a bed (only). (Exuma) ...
  • bed-stern
    /bed ston/ [from bedstead + stern rear of ship] n. the foot-board of a bedstead. cf. BESTARD (Gen.) ...
  • beeby
    See BIBBY ...
  • beef
    n. 1. [cf. 1811 DVT "To be in a woman's beef: to have carnal knowledge of her"] vagina: Look at the girl beef na! Specially ...
  • beef bush
    [DJE different sp.; from the reddish color of its wood] n. a shrub: 1910 Beef bush . . . Tecoma bahamensis (Northrop 182). 1920 Beef ...
  • beef-of-the-sea
    [in reference to its meat] n. the loggerhead turtle. cf. MUTTON-OF-THE-SEA, VEAL-OF-THE-SEA (Adelaide) ...
  • beefwood
    [OED, DJE different sp., from the reddish color] n. a tree, variously identified: 1889 Casuarina equisetifolia ... beefwood (Gardner 404). 1977 Guapira obtusa (Patterson 87). ...
  • beeg
    /biyg/ [cf. Jam. "/ii/ can replace /i/: /iin/ in, /hiiich/ itch" DJE:xlv; perhaps a survival of 17th century Eng. or due to African influence] adj. ...
  • been, bin
    /bin/ [Atlantic; form derived from Brit. dial. South been and marking past EDD, but its semantic and syntactic source probably African preverbal anterior markers, e.g. ...
  • been-a
    [Car.; from BEEN 1 + A1]  preverbal marker of anterior progressive, Obs? 1918 You see what I bin a-do? (Parsons 19) ...
  • been an'
    [Gul. idem (Parsons 1923:96); cf. BEEN] preverbal marker of anterior time: 1966 He been an eat the three pumpkins (Crowley 61). ...
  • been gone
    [cf. US Black gone crazy (Major); OED gone of persons ... undone] adj. phr. insane: He been gone a long time. (Black) ...
  • before-time, before-days
    [Car.; cf. OED before-times adv..- 1647] n. an earlier period: Before-time was better than now (Nassau). (Black) —adj. pertaining to an earlier period: Children of ...
  • beg
    /beg, beyg/ [W Car.; cf. OED to beg bread] v.t. to ask (a person for a thing): 1918 His wife . . . come and ...
  • beggar-man
    [OED, combination found in King Lear 1605] n. at a Baptist church CONCERT, a man appointed to cajole and collect individual donations from the congregation, ...
  • behind
    prep. 1. [also Jam. (U. May p.c.)] after, such as another word in a sentence: I don't understand the word come behind "seem" (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • being as
    /biyn as/ [Brit., US dial. idern EDD, ADD] conj. phr. because: I don't go there, being as it too expensive (Nassau). (Gen.) ...
  • belbo
    /bélbow/ [etym. unknown, but cf. Scots baubee halfpenny CSD] n. the old brass three-pence coin, especially when found and not taken, lest it be a ...
  • Bellaby
    /bélabi/ [cf. 1811 DVT Barnaby an old dance to a quick movement, possibly converging with African words, e.g. Kongo (e)bwela type of dance, mbele a ...
  • belly
    [Pan-Creole; cf. Krio gεt bεlε', Peti-nègue gãyé labõt, Guine Port. Cr. teŋ bariigə, all lit. have belly, i.e. be pregnant (Hancock 1971:658); a calque on ...
  • belly-ache plant
    [from its use as a remedy] n. a plant, Aloe vera: 1978 Aloe vera . . . brought to south Florida by early settlers from ...
  • belly-swell
    [Car.] n, a swelling of the belly from malnutrition: Them children over there with they belly swell look like all they got in it is ...
  • belly-woman
    [Car.; cf. BELLY 1] n. a pregnant woman. (Mayag.) ...
  • belly work
    [Atlantic; cf. Sra. wrokobere WST, Krio wok bεlε KED; by analogy with Brit. dial. North headwark 'headache' (Orton L46)] phr., Rare, have diarrhea: My belly ...
  • belong
    (White); blonks (Black) v. 1. [cf. Krio blant idem KED, Gul. blonx belong (Gonzales 1922: 290); from Brit. dial. North, West belong with omission of ...
  • below
    See RICE BELOW. ...
  • Ben Giant
    [perhaps from bent-joint (Cassidy p.c.); cf. DJE jointer bush . . . black giant... /jaint/ joint] n. a kind of wild fruit (sp?): 1977 (Albury ...
  • benny
    [Atlantic; from Wolof bεnε., Bambara bene sesame (Turner 1949:191)] n. the sesame seed: 1835 Sesamum indicum ... Benny (Journal 28). 1918 Benny, a grain much ...
  • benny cake
    n. sesame seed candy: 1934 Benny cake: made from seeds and boiled sugar cane, is allowed to harden and is like a candied cereal (Bell ...
  • Benson line
    [cf. Plimsoll line load-line markings on a cargo ship W3] n. (in playing marbles) the line behind which one must stand when throwing marbles into ...
  • be on
    [cf. W Car. de pan idem] v. phr, to be engaged in an activity: 1966 The man been one day on that [trying to catch ...
  • ber
    See B'. ...
  • Bermooda
    /bamúwda/ [named after the Sp. explorer Bermudez /bermtiwdhes/ but Bermudians call themselves 'Mudians /myúwjanz/ (Ayres 1933 :3)] n. Bermuda: ca. 1707 Bermoodas Islands (quoted by ...
  • beside: get beside yourself with somebody
    [Car.] phr. to become insubordinate; to forget one's place: Child: "You can't tell me what to do!" Adult: "You want get beside yourself with me?" ...
  • beskard
    See BESTARD. ...
  • best
    [cf. colloq. had best OED, W3; dial, best idem ADD] modal v. had better: 1888 Else you'se best stop (Powles 285). (Gen.) —adj., adv. [Brit., ...
  • bestard
    /béstad/, beskard [cf. BEDSTEAD head-board] n. the headboard of a bed: When I jump in the bed, I knock my head on the beskard (Nassau). ...
  • bestard foot
    [cf. BESTARD] n. the footboard of a bed. (Exuma) ...
  • best-best
    [Car.; cf. Sra. besbesi idem WST; cf. Port. Cr. miʎɔr-miʎɔr idem from Port. melhor best (Ivens Ferraz 1979:58) from best by reduplication] adj. very best: ...
  • bestest
    /bésis/ [Car.; Brit., US dial. idem EDD, ADD] adj. very best: My boyfriend got the bestest car (Nassau). cf. MOSTEST, WORSTEST (Exuma, Nassau) ...
  • betcha
    [W Car.; from I bet you] phr. a threat or warning: 1918 I betcher I bite you (Parsons 14). (Gen.) ...
  • between
    [W Car.; OED, in the space which separates two points (vs. among, separating three or more)] prep. among: between people [in public] (Eleu.). Between all ...
  • beyeh
    [from brother; cf. 81 n., Obs? brother, a term of address to a male peer: 1895 I would n' matte' gittin' somet 'in' to eat, ...
  • bibby
    /bíbi/, beeby /bíybi/ [US Black idem (A. Patur p.c.); cf. BOOBOO 4] n. 1. mucus in the corner of the eye: 1918 The cat came ...
  • Bible
    [from swearing by the Bible; cf. DAS bible the truth; cf. Kriogospel the only truth KED, US colloq. the gospel truth idem] n. the absolute ...
  • biddy
    [Gul. idem ADD; cf. Gul. bidibidi a small bird; a small chicken, Kongo bidibidi a bird (Turner 1949:191)] n. 1. a chick: 1977 Each family ...
  • big
    [Pan-Creole; cf. LA Fr. gros (lit. big) idem (Taylor 1951b:43); cf. Scots big pregnant CSD; US dial. South big to get with child ADD] adj. ...
  • big ants
    [W Car.] n. a species of large, winged ant: Them big ants does bite hard, hear? (Nassau). (Gen) ...
  • big-belly
    [Car.; cf DHS big-bellied far gone in pregnancy 1711; cf. also BIG, BELLY] n. pregnancy. (Black) —adj. pregnant: That big-belly woman soon ready to have ...
  • big-big
    [Pan-Creole; cf. Haitian gra-gra (Sylvain 1936:46 and Port. Cr. of Senegal grãdi-grãdi (Ivens Ferraz 1979:58) and reduplicated African forms, e.g. Kongo múpátipáti (Carter & Makoondekwa ...
  • big copper
    [DJE idem] n. an old English penny: 1888 (Powles 158). cf. SMALL COPPER (Gen.) ...
  • big coppice land
    [from big referring to high growth + coppice grove, copse W3] n., Obs? land supporting taller trees, vs. scrubland: 1905 The coppice is large and ...
  • big-eye
    [Pan-Creole; cf. Haitian gwo je (lit. big eye) greedy HCEFD; US Black (Smiley 1919:358); calque e.g. Igbo aŋa uku (Turner 1949:233), Twi ani bre (Aboagye ...
  • Big-eye John
    [from its prominent eyes] n. the squirrelfish, Holocentrus sp. = POP-EYE JOHN, JACK BRUSH (Gen.) ...
  • big-eye porgie
    n. a fish, a kind of porgie (sp?): 1936 A big-eye porgie on won side uv 'im an' wun lobster on d' udder side (Dupuch ...
  • big-eye stargazer
    [from appearance of staring upwards] n. a fish, Dactyloscopus crossotus: 1968 (Böhlke 496). (Black) ...
  • big-foot
    [cf. Sra. bigi-foetoe elephantiasis WST, and possible influence from an earlier form parallel to Jam. bufutu big, clumsy DJE or Kilo gbɔfɔtɔ idem, from Temne ...
  • big finger
    [Atlantic; "by analogy with big toe or contrast with little finger" DJE] n. the thumb: I cut my big finger last night where I was ...
  • Big George
    n. a variety of bitter cassava used to make cassava bread after grating and wringing out the poisonous juice. (Andros, Eleu.) ...
  • Big Georgie Lackwood
    [cf. BIG GEORGE] n. a variety of sweet potato. (Mayag.) ...
  • biggity, bigge(r)ty
    /bígati/ [Gul. idem (Rhame 1933:41); cf. Scots biggit wealthy CSD; US dial. South, Mid. biggity "prob. big + -ity quality, state; cf. uppity ... vain, ...
  • big-gut
    n. a swelling of the belly from malnutrition. = BELLY-SWELL, GAS GUT, SWELL-BELLY (Black) ...
  • biggy
    [from big, but cf. -RE, -Y suffix and Sra. bigi idem WST] adj., Obs? big: 1895 See dis biggy, biggy han' here? (Edwards 74). —n. ...
  • bight
    [MCC idem; OED, an indentation in a coastline ... a bay, but cf. DAE quot. "Two small bights of land on each side of the ...
  • Big John
    [cf. BIG GEORGE] n. a variety of bitter white cassava. (Andros, San Sal.) ...
  • big people
    [Pan-Creole; cf. Haitian gran moun idem TDKF; an African idiom: cf. Bemba abakulu adults (M. Mann p.c.) and Twi mpa hyin sem, lit. big people ...
  • big pussly
    [cf. PUSSLY] n. a succulent plant (sp?) which grows near the sea. (Berry) ...
  • big-ring play
    [Cf. RING-PLAY] n. singing games performed while standing in a large circle: The Lodge Hall . . was the scene of dances and "big-ring plays" ...
  • big sage
    n. a plant, Lantana involucrata: 1910 (Northrop 180). = WILD (WHITE) SAGE (Black) ...
  • big sour
    [cf. SOUR] n. 1. the Seville or sour orange: I's use the big sour for ma conch salad (Nassau). (Black) 2. the grapefruit. cf. LITTLE ...
  • big thumb
    /big tom/ [Car.; cf. BIG FINGER] n. the thumb. (Black) ...
  • big-tumma
    /big tóma/ [from big + tummy] n. a swelling of the belly due to malnutrition. (Andros, Nassau) ...
  • big up
    [MCC idem; cf. BIG] v. to swell up; become big. (Mayag., San Sal.) —adj. pregnant: Zelly and her sister all two on 'em big right ...
  • bilgy
    /bílji / [cf. OED bilge the foulness which collects in the bottom of a ship's ha; bilgy characteristic of a bilge] adj. 1. (of water) ...
  • bill fish
    n. 1. a fish, Belone truncata: 1782 The sea hereabouts (Bahamas etc.) abounds with fish unknown to us in Europe . . . bill-fish, hound-fish, ...
  • bill vine
    n. a vine, Cissus intermedia. cf. BULL VINE (Nassau) ...
  • Billy Bowleg
    a typical Seminole personal name (Neill 1976:112)] n. a Seminole Indian: 1966 (Crowley 18). (Andros) ...
  • Bimini
    [probably from Lucayan] n. the Bahamian islands closest to Florida: 1511 map: Isla de beimeni (Curry 1928:20, 28). 1523 Bimene (Turin map, quoted by Craton ...
  • bin
    See BEEN. ...
  • bine-a-bush
    [cf. OED bine flexible stem of a climbing plant] n. a plant, (Cassia biflora?) with reddish leaves. = MOSQUITO BUSH. (Andros, San Sal.) ...
  • bird-eye napkins
    [cf. US bird's eye marked with spots resembling birds' eyes: "bird's eye diaper" W3] n. diapers (made from flour bags). (Black) ...
  • bird grass
    (Andros, Grand Bah.); bird prickle (Andros) [US different sp. W3; probably from bur + hypercorrection, but cf. quot.] n. 1.a grass with burs, Cenchrus echinatus.= ...
  • bird pepper, bud peppa
    /bod pepa/ [Car.; DJE "favoured by birds" 1696 —)-; OED 1786 →; DAE 1785 --)-; cf. Reunion Cr. Fr. pima zwazo (lit. pepper bird) le ...
  • bird prickle
    See BIRD GRASS. ...
  • bird's eye
    [cf. US idem, "a geometric pattern ... of a small diamond with a center dot resembling a bird's eye" W3; from appearance of pineapple's eyes] ...
  • birth
    v. [Gul., US dial. South idem ADD] 1. to aid in the birth: I birth that calf (but the cow born it) (Nassau). 2. to ...
  • birth-home
    n. birthplace: Your birth-home in Nassau? (Acklins, Crooked) ...
  • birth-place
    [cf. BIRTH afterbirth] n. where one's afterbirth is buried, often the mother's yard; 1966 (Otterbein 63, 64). Tha's you birth-place, way that bury (Acklins). (Black) ...
  • bit (1)
    [ Car.; from physically cutting Spanish dollars into 8 bits or pieces of eight; bit is used with various equivalents, e.g. 8 cents (Guyana), 10 ...
  • bit (2)
    n. item, article: Erry bit o' dem is socks (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • bitch
    n. [Car.; Scots idem CSD] a mild insult for males and objects: 1966 You bitch! [to a dead monster] (Crowley 115). When he think Jack ...
  • bitch
    intj. [probably from a phrase such as "Take that, you bitch!"] said when one person hits another, much like Sp. olé or Fr, touché, especially ...
  • bitch-blow
    [cf. BITCH intj.] n. a heavy blow: You suppose to give him one bitch-blow then (Nassau). It take one bitch-blow from dat man dere to ...
  • bitch up
    [Car.; DHS idem; cf. botch] v. phr. 1. to ruin, spoil; to frustrate. 2. [by extension] to make something hastily: Let me go bitch up ...
  • bite
    v. 1. [DHS idem] to swindle; to deceive in trading. (White) 2. [Car.; in many Bantu languages, the words for 'bite' and 'sting' are identical, ...
  • biter
    [cf. OED nipper idem; cf. also Haitian dan (cf. Fr. dent tooth) idern HCEFDI n. the pincers of a crab or lobster: You meet the ...
  • biting ants
    [W. Car.; cf. ANTS] n. 1. a small black ant (sp?) which bites fiercely: You can't go barefeet there—i's too much biting ants (Nassau). = ...
  • bitter orange
    /bíta oríynj/ n. the Seville orange, Citrus bigaradia: 1889 Bitter orange. . . used for marmelades, candied orange peel, and bitter tinctures (Gardner 370). = ...
  • bitter root, bitter bush
     [W3, WE different sp.] n. a plant, Picramnia pentandra, used medicinally: 1920 (Britton 210). = SNAKE ROOT, BITTERWOOD (San Sal.) ...
  • bitters
    [OED, bitter medicines generally] n. 1. a particular bush (sp?) whose leaves are boiled by the midwife as a tonic for the mother. (Eleu.) 2. ...
  • bitters tea
    [Car.; cf. BITTERS] n. a medicinal infusion: Mama did used to make me drink bitters tea when I catch a check.(Nassau). (Black) ...
  • bitter-sweet
    [OED, W3 different sp.] n. 1. a plant, Duranta repens: 1905 (Shattuck 262). = PIGEON BERRY I (Black) 2. the common lemon. (Long, Andros) ...
  • bitterwood
    [OED, W3, DIE different sp.] n. 1. a shrub, Picramnia pentandra: 1905 (Shattuck 206) = BITTER ROOT, SNAKE ROOT 2. a tree, Picrodendron baccatum: 1977 ...
  • black
    [ Scots idem CSD] v.t. to blacken: Colly blacked the smoothing iron (White). Fire could black the pot (Exuma). ...
  • black-bar soldier fish
    n. a fish, Myripristis jacobus, with a black mark behind its head: 1968 (Böhlke 153). (Black) ...
  • black bastard buttonwood
    [cf. BASTARD BUTTON-WOOD] n. a tree, Laguncularia racemosa. (Andros) ...
  • black bee
    (San Sal., Mayag.); black bug (Andros) n. the palm weevil, Rhynchophorus cruentatus, a black stinging insect which bores into the heart of the coconut palm. ...
  • blackbird
    [DIE def. 1; OED different sp.] n. 1. a bird, Crotophaga ani, with a parrot-like beak: 1880 Rain crow or Blackbird (Cory 118). 1880 Birds ...
  • black bush
    [W3 different sp.] n. a medicinal plant, Avicennia nitida: 1978 Black bush . . used for the "building up of a breakdown system" (Higgs 15). ...
  • Black Charles
    n. 1. a bird, the black grosbeak (Loxigilla noctis): 1880 (Cory 87). (Inagua) 2. a bird, the Greater Antillean bullfinch (Loxigilla violacea): 1960 (Bond 231). ...
  • black crab
    [DJE different sp.] n. a land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis, considered a delicacy: 1925 Black crab live in the land (Finlay 297). 1973 A basket of ...
  • black crow
    the smooth-billed ani, Crotophaga ani: 1972 (Paterson 94). = BLACKBIRD 1, RAIN-CROW, BLACK DAW, JACK DAWL, LONG-TAIL CROW, GRAVEYARD BIRD ...
  • black daw, black dawl
    /blak doh(l)/ (San Sal.); black dolly /blak dóhli/ (Andros, Nassau) [cf. jack daw + doll(y)] n. a bird, the smooth-billed ani (Crotophaga ani): 1960 Black ...
  • black ebony
    [US different sp. W3] n. 1. a tree, Albizzia lebbek: 1889 (Gardner 375). = MUSIC TREE, SINGING TREE, WHISTLING BEAN, WOMAN'S TONGUE 2. a tree, ...
  • black-eye bird
    n. 1. the Bahama yellowthroat, Geothlypis rostrata. See quot. for def. 2. 2. the common yellowthroat, G. trichas: 1972 Both species are known as black-eye ...
  • black-eyed Susan tree
    [US black-eyed Susan different sp. W3] n. 1. a plant, Abrus precatorius, which has red beans with a black spot: 1889 (Gardner 377). = BEAD ...
  • black feney
    [etym?] n. a hardwood tree (sp?): 1782 Manchinella, black feney, dog-wood (Bruce 45). 1975 Lesser known hardwoods ... black feney (Albury 79). (Exuma) ...
  • black-fin shark
    [W Car.] n. a large, deep-sea shark (sp?). (Exuma, San Sal., White) ...
  • black-guard
    [OED to abuse or revile in scurrilous terms; US dial. South idem ADD] v.t. to insult a person's family. (Eleu.) ...
  • blackie
    [from color] n. a stinging insect (sp?) resembling an ant. (Abaco) ...
  • black iron
    n. a flat iron for pressing clothes, heated over a fire: 1977  Black irons, heated by an open fire, . . . were used for ...
  • black jack
    [DAE, DJE no sp.] n. a dark-colored jackfish, Caranx lugubris: 1968 (Böhlke 332). = PASSING JACK (Gen.) ...
  • Black Jeff
    n. a wasp, Pepsis sp.: 1978 Sometimes called the black Jeff in the Bahamas, the tarantula hawk as an adult sips nectar from flowers, but ...
  • black land
    [US, land having a black soil DAE] n. rich inland soil containing humus: But now the crab they start a-walking in the black land in ...
  • black mangrove
    [US different sp. W3] n. a tree, Avicennia nitida, with leaves that are dark green or almost black: 1910 (Northrop 180). 1977 Black mangrove . ...
  • Black Maria
    [DAE, DES prison van, DAS a hearse] n. 1. a hand ambulance used on police cases before the day of motor ambulances: 1936 Ma say ...
  • black-nose shark
    n. the hammerhead shark, Carcharhinus acronotus: 1968 (Böhlke 16). (Black) ...
  • black sisal
    /blak sáysal/ n. a dark variety of sisal, Agave sp. (Andros, San Sal.) ...
  • black soap
    n. a plant, Scaevola plumierii, with black berries: 1920 (Britton 429). = INK BERRY, PEN-AND-INK (Exuma) ...
  • black spider
    [Car.] n. a spider, Latrodectus mactans, the poisonous black widow: One a them black spider could be in the grass and you won't know (Nassau). ...
  • black-spotted snake eel
    n., an eel, Quassiremus productus: 1968 (Böhlke 105). (Black) ...
  • black stick
    n. 1. [W Car.] a variety of cassava. (San Sal., Mayag.) 2. [cf. STICK tree] a tree, Erithalis fruticosa. = BLACK TORCH(WOOD) (Exuma) ...
  • black tar-baby
    See TAR-BABY. ...
  • black thrasher
    [cf. THRASHER] n, a bird, the pearly-eyed thrasher (Margarops fuscatus): 1960 (Bond 169). (Exuma, San Sal.) = JACK BIRD, PAWPAW BIRD ...
  • black torch berry
    n. a plant, Tetrazygia cleagnoides: 1889 (Gardner 380). (Exuma, White) ...
  • black torch(wood)
     n. a tree, Erithalis fruticosa: 1905 (Shattuck 237). = BLACK STICK 2 (Gen.) ...
  • black up
    adj. bruised (of an eye): Her eye look all black up (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • black up
    v. phr. [Car.; DJE from "black (or block, which is also /blak/ in the dial.)" of Jam. but in Bah. /blonk/] to lose control of ...
  • Blackus
    /blákas/ [referring to skin color] n. an insulting name (youth slang). (Nassau) ...
  • black wasp
    /blak was/ [W Car.] n. a black stinging insect (sp?): Black wasp, that's a big wasp have black wings—we's call it the poison wasp, too ...
  • blackwood
    [US different sp. W3; from the color of its leaves rather than wood] n. 1. a tree, Avicennia germinans: 1869 (Bacot 89). = BLACK MANGROVE ...
  • bladder
    [Belize idem (Dayley 1979); cf. Haitian blad idem TDKF; OED, anything inflated and hollow] n. a balloon: They were selling bladders for the children (Nassau). ...
  • blading off
    [from the cutting blade] phr. smoothing down limestone to make a road: 1976 Thousands of miles of roads have been made by "blading off" the ...
  • blanket field
    [etym?] n., Obs. a cotton field: 1832 People weeding in the Cotton field, or what the Negroes call the Blanket Field (Farquharson 12). ...
  • blast
    /blas; also blast (White)/ [cf. Jam. black blast DJE; OED a sudden infection destructive to vegetable or animal life (formerly attributed to the blowing or ...
  • blessing
     n. 1. [OED, prospering influence of God] a very brief shower of rain. (Andros, San Sal.) 2. [OED, euphemism for a curse] a scolding (ironic): ...
  • blind charm
     [cf. W3 blind subterfuge] n. an intentionally misleading explanation; a cover-up. (Black) ...
  • blind-eye bush
    [cf. DJE blind-eye different sp., "resin is liable to irritate the eyes of axemen"] n. a shrub, Helicteres jamaicensis: 1920 (Britton 276). = COW BUSH ...
  • blind road
    [cf. blind alley an alley closed at one end] n. a small gravel road leading off the main one. (Eleu.) ...
  • blocked out
     phr. (of a passage way) blocked: I can't get past—the door block out (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • blocks
    (Black); block (San Sal., Mayag., Inagua) [cf. US city block; Australian the block a street or quarter of a city; often a section popular as ...
  • blonks
    See BELONG. ...
  • blolly wood
    (White); blorry (Eleu.) [cf. W3, DJE loblolly different sp.] n. a tree, Guapira discolor: 1977 (Patterson 75). 1977 Bloli-wood (Albury 25). ...
  • Bloochel
    /blúwchal/ [from blue shell?] n. the name of a folktale character. (Cat) ...
  • blood
    [OED, a hot spark, a man of fire ... rake, roisterer obs. early 19th century] n. a daredevil: 1936 Dat time we shoot right tru' ...
  • blood berry
    [W3, DJE different sp.] n. a tree, Guapira obtusa, with juicy red berries: 1977 (Patterson 86). = BEEFWOOD (Andros, Exuma) ...
  • bloodsucker
    [OED, animal which sucks blood] n. 1. a variety of mosquito. (Adelaide) 2. the bedbug. (San Sal.) 3. a witch reputed to suck people's blood: ...
  • bloojoom!
    /blujúwm, bluzhúwm/ [also Guy. baajow idem (Yansen 13), Gui. boo-joo (Writers' Program 1940:4); cf. Yoruba bo ... jum! drop ... splash! (Oyedeji p.c.)] intj. imitative ...
  • bloomers
    [W3 "after Mrs. Amelia Bloomer (died 1894) Am. pioneer in social reform who advocated such clothing ... a costume for women introduced about 1850 . ...
  • blossom
    n. a particular plant (sp?) with yellow flowers. (Nassau, Inagua) ...
  • blow
    n. 1. [cf. Brit. dial. North, Scots blow breathe EDD; DHS blow a breathing space, have a blow to rest] a rest, especially in the ...
  • blow-conch
    /blów kohngk/ n. a conch shell with a small hole in the tip, used as a horn for signaling. = CONCH SHELL (Gen.) ...
  • blue
    n. 1. [Car.; Brit. usage] laundry bluing: 1918 He take a white sheet an a tub o' water. . . an' put blue in de ...
  • blue balls
    [US slang idem (A. Abrahamse p.c.); DAS gonorrhea] n. aching of the testicles caused by sexual frustration: 1971 The sexual frustrations . . were often ...
  • bluebirds through my window
    [from first line of a song] n. a children's RING-PLAY with variations: a. played like "London Bridge" but sung to a different tune (San Sal.), ...
  • blue catnip, blue capnit
    n. a fragrant herb, Nepeta coerulea, related to catnip (N. cataria): 1889 (Gardner 398). = CAT MINT, JERUSALEM CATNIT (Mayag., Inagua) ...
  • blue fleabane
    n. a plant, Veronia cinerea, with bright blue flowers. (Exuma) ...
  • blue flowers
    [cf. FLOWERS] n. a plant, Valerianoides or Stachytarpheta jamaicensis, with bright blue flowers on a long, erect spike: 1889 (Gardner 398). Shepherd needle and blue ...
  • blue hole
      n. 1. [Belize idem (Escure 1980:7)] a deep, usually round hole in the ocean floor: 1905 Submarine ocean holes, or "blue holes" shown by an ...
  • Blue Jane
    n. the red-legged thrush, Mimocichla plumbea: 1960 (Bond 174). BLUE THRASHER 1, SPANISH THRASHER ...
  • Blue Mountain cassava
    [cf. DJE blue-bud cassava and the Blue Mountains of Jamaica] n. two varieties of cassava: 1. bitter cassava which is poisonous: Blue Mountain cassava, da's ...
  • blue rainbow
    (San Sal.); blue rimba (Berry); blue rimpa (Andros); blue wimbo (Cat) [cf. GILLEM-BOW] n. a fish, Iridio bivittatus; it is the mature SLIPPERY DICK and ...
  • blue runner
    n. a jackfish, Caranx fusus: 1968 (Böhlke 331). (Gen.) ...
  • blue-stripe lizard fish
    n. a fish, Synodus saurus: 1968 (Böhlke 60). = CANIMO (Bleu., San Sal.) ...
  • blue-tailed lizard
    [DJE different sp.] n. a lizard, Ameiva auberi: 1880 The blue-tailed lizard frequents hot, sandy places ... It is about ten inches long (Ives 133). ...
  • blue tang
    n. an angelfish, Acanthurus coeruleus: 1968 (Böhlke 656). (Black) ...
  • blue t(h)rasher
    (Inagua); blue thrusher (White) [cf. Brit. dial. South thresher, thrusher; US thrasher all thrush OED] n. I. the red-legged thrush, Mimocichla plumbea: 1880 (Cory 45). ...
  • blue wimbo
    See BLUE RAINBOW. ...
  • bluey
    adj. [US dial. idem ADD] bluish: 1978 The thin bluey-white milk under the [coconut] cream is of no use (Higgs 91). (Black) --n. a blue ...
  • blush
    [OED, to glance with the eye obs. → 1450] v. 1.(of girls) to turn the head to one side and smile coyly (no reference to skin ...
  • b'o'
    See B'. ...
  • boa(r), bow
    /bow/ [cf. Gul. boar coon (Rhame 1933:41); cf. OED boar male swine, transferred to obs. boar cat, boar dog, etc. for male of species] n., ...
  • boar black torch
    [cf. BOAR 2, 3] a tree, Philanthus myrtilloides: 1905 (Shattuck 237). (Inagua) ...
  • boar cat
    /bow kat/; bull cat /bu kat/ [Atlantic; cf. OED  boar cat male cat obs.→1797; also Brit., US dial. South EDD, ADD] n. a male cat: ...
  • board
    [Atlantic; cf. DJE, KED; also Gul. piece o' boa'd (Parsons 1923:13)] n. wood, as a material: In a hurricane it is best to put some ...
  • board-handle
    [Jam. idem DJE; cf. BOARD] n. a type of machete with a wooden handle. (Black) ...
  • board shoes
    [Car.; cf. BOARD] n. home-made sandals with wooden soles: I hear about board shoes before-time, but l ain' never see none—only the wampers (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • boar grass
    (Mayag.); bull grass (Eleu., Adelaide) [cf. DAE bull grass a variety of pasture grass, Paspalum undulatum] n. a kind of tall, broad-bladed grass (sp?) used ...
  • boar gum-elemi
    /bow gamélami/ [cf. BOAR 2, 3] n. 1. a tree, Bursera inaguensis: 1977 (Patterson 103). (Gen.) 2. the male gum-elemi tree, Bursera simaruba: Gum elemi-boar ...
  • boar-hog bush
    n. a plant, Callicarpa hitchcockii, used medicinally: 1920 (Britton 373). 1978 Bo' Hog Bush is used to stimulate the appetite . . . the brew ...
  • boar mastic
    n. a tree, Linociera bumelioides: 1977 (Patterson 71). (Exuma, Inagua) ...
  • boar pigeon (plum)
    n. a tree, Coccoloba krugii, with small, dark red fruit: 1920 (Britton 118). = CRAB WOOD 3, FAMILY WOOD (Black) ...
  • boar-stag
    /bow stag/ [cf. Brit. dial. Mid., West idem a castrated boar; cf. also BOAR 4] n. a term of derision for either partner in a ...
  • boar thistle
    /bow tísl(i)/ [cf. OED, a corruption of bur thistle, DAE bull thistle, both different sp.] n. a plant, Sonchus oleraceus, with yellow flowers. (Inagua, Nassau) ...
  • boar top, bow top
    [cf. TOP palm] n. a variety of palm tree, Coccothrinax sp.: To make a broom: look for about ten leaves of bow top and tie ...
  • boarwood, boa wood
     n. a tree, Diospyros crassinervis, with round black fruit: 1920 (Britton 326). = FEATHERBED, OLD MAN 2 (San Sal.) ...
  • boassin
    /bówsin/ (Gen.); boastin' /bówstin/ (Berry) [Atlantic; cf. Krio bosin hernia KED; Guy. son swollen testicles (Rickford 1976:8); Jam. buosan "(cf. Twi abosi sp. of yam) ...
  • boassy
    (Black); boasty (White) [Car.; cf. OED boasty boastful obs.] adj. boastful; conceited. ...
  • boat lily
    n. a plant, Rhoeo discolor: 1920 (Britton 68). = PURPLE LILY ...
  • bob
    [cf. OED, a rounded mass at the end of a rod, etc.; a knob obs. → 1659] n. a round lump, such as the large seed ...
  • bobo
    /bówbow/ [cf. Atlantic bumbo idem; "cf. Temne a-bómbo labia, Zulu -búmbu pubic region, Xhosa -bhombo vagina" (Hancock 1969:71), Kongo bumbu fertility (Carter p.c.); cf. 1811 ...
  • bobo: go bobo
    [cf. BOSTON] phr. to get nearly all the tricks in playing whist: We gone bobo on them—they didn't even get one book (Nassau). ...
  • bodooda
    /badúwda/ [etym?] n. a small red and black land crab. = JUNJO, SHAGGO (Mayag.) ...
  • bog, borg
    /bohg/ [Gul. idem (Writers' Program 1940:62); cf. OED bog v.i. to sink and stick in a bog obs.  → 1800] v.i. to sink and stick ...
  • Bogue, Boague
    /bowg/ [ W Car.; cf. Brit: dial. North bog /bowg/ + Sp. boca river mouth DJE, also US dial. South bogue creek ADD] n., Obs. ...
  • bogus
    /bówgas/ adj. [cf. US Black bogart a bully; a physically aggressive person (Claerbaut)] aggressive; outspoken. (Nassau) ...
  • bogus
    n. [cf. colloq. Brit. boagy, , Scots boakie, US booger idem] nasal mucus. = BOO, BOOBOO, BOOBY, BOOGIE (Exuma) ...
  • boil
    /boyl, borl/ n. 1. [W Car.; cf. OED, that which is boiled 1755; Scots, meat for boiling CSD] a stew; anything boiled: 1918 They put ...
  • boil fish
    [boil could derive from boiled (cf. FRY FISH) or be a n. adjunct (cf. BOIL 1)] n. a Bahamian dish, consisting of whitefish steaks boiled ...
  • Boiling hole
    [cf. BOIL 2] n. a deep hole in the sea floor with surging fresh water: 1910 The boiling hole was about a foot under water ...
  • boil your pot
    [cf. US dial. South boil the pot to cook a vegetable dinner WEA] phr. to be financially able to eat: If you can boil your ...
  • bold
    [Car.; OED, audacious] adj. aggressively rude. (Gen.) ...
  • bomb
    /bohm/; boum /bum/ [cf. Haitian bobo from Fr, bonbon confection] n. a kind of coco-nut tart: Coconut bomb: 30 cents [on a menu at a ...
  • bomb-chest
    /bohm ches/; boom-chest /burn ches/ [probably from collision with chest] n. a children's game in which a handful of pebbles or snail shells is tossed ...
  • bonavis beans
    (Black); bonavis peas (White) /bóhnavis/ [DJE idem "from the place of origin, the island of Bona Vista, Cape Verde"] n. an edible bean, Dolichos lablab ...
  • bone
    n. the central spine of a palm frond. (Andros, Exuma) ...
  • bones: I bones
    [etym?] phr. (in playing KNUCKS HOLE with marbles) the announcement made after going from the first to the third hole and back again for the ...
  • boney sicker, boney sticker
    See BANNY-SINKEL. ...
  • bong
    [cf. BANG-BANG, DING-DONG] v. to ring (a bell): They had a bell which they bong when they needed it (Long). (Gen.) ...
  • bonnet
    bonnet-cub (Gen.); bonnet-nose cub (Mayag.); bonnet-mouth (Exuma, Inagua) [from the lobes around the mouth (see quot.); cf. CUB, COR13] n. the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo: ...
  • boo (1)
    [cf. B', B'O' brother] n. my dear (as a term of address). (Black) ...
  • boo (2)
    [Bajan idem (Collymore)] n. nasal mucus. (White) ...
  • booboo (1), booboo-man
    [Pan-Creole; cf. MCC buubuu, Sra. boeboe NEW, Guy, boo-boo man (Yansen 14), Trin. Fr. boubou (Thomas 20) idem; a convergence of Brit. dial. North, Scots ...
  • booboo (2)
    [cf. Gul. bubu any insect (usually one whose sting is poisonous); cf. Fula mbubu a fly, Kongo mbu mosquito, Fon  mbutu insect (Turner 1949:191)] n. ...
  • booboo (3)
    [Car.; cf. BOO2] n. nasal mucus.  (San Sal.) ...
  • booby
    /búwbi/ [cf. B002 , BOOBOO3] n. nasal mucus. (Mayag., Ragged) ...
  • boodow bat
     /búwdow bat/ [etym?; cf. BAT moth] n. a large, dark moth (sp?); its wings leave a smudge if touched. (Andros, San Sal.) ...
  • boof
    See BOUF. ...
  • boogie (1)
    [Probably the convergence of two words of different origin, one meaning 'devil' and the other 'dance'. For the first, cf. OED Bogy the devil (probably ...
  • boogie (2)
    [cf. US booger idem W3; DAS bugger, boogie idem] n. nasal mucus. (Eleu.) ...
  • book
    n. [cf. 1811 DVT books cards to play with; DHS the first six tricks at whist] n. (in card games) a trick: I only need ...
  • book
    v. [cf. BUCK] butt: D' ram-goat book 'im in he belly (Dupuch p.c.). (Nassau) ...
  • booker man
    [cf. BOUGAMAN 2 and Scots boakie idem CSD] n. nasal mucus. (Long) ...
  • Booky
    /búki/ [Pan-Creole; cf. Prov. Breda Bookie (Washabaugh 1980:8), Louisiana Black Bookee (Fauset 1927:242), Haitian Bouqui (Crowley 1966:29); the origin seems to be European (cf. Fr. ...
  • boomba
    /búwmba/, boomby /búwmbi/ [cf. US dial. South boompie idem DARE, North boomba (C. Pales p.c.); also South Am. Sp. bombó idem (Hancock 1969:71)] n. buttocks. ...
  • boom-ba-den
    See BE BO BEN. ...
  • boomba-fly
    [cf. BOOBOO2 2] n. a gnat. = BUMBLE FLY (Black) ...
  • boom-boom
    /búwmbuwm/ [cf. Guy. bambam idem (Rickford 1976:6), Trin. bombóm idem, Brit. bum (North /bum/) idem (Hancock 1969: 71); cf. also BOOMBA] n. buttocks (child's word). ...
  • booster
    [US promoter W3] n. 1. a powerful person behind a scheme. (Black) 2. a boy who conveys messages between lovers. (Andros, Mayag.) ...
  • boot
    [etym?] n. a variety of avacado. (Exuma) ...
  • bootalize
    /búwtalayz/ [cf. Jam. b'ute brute DJE, OED brutalize to treat as a brute, or brutally] v. to have sexual intercourse (with a girl). (Mayag.) ...
  • boots
    [Belize idem (Dayley 1979); from pl.] n. sing. and pl. boot: I meet one boots lying on the floor. cf. SHOES, SLIPPERS, SOCKS, GLOVES (Abaco, ...
  • bore
    /bow/ [Atlantic; cf. Jam, bore to be penetrated DJE, Krio bo having a hole KED; from passivization or past participle of Eng. bore] adj. pierced; ...
  • borer
    /bówra/ [cf. Vir. boora a disease that attacks sugar cane (Emanuel 1972:84); cf. BORE and Kogno -bola rot (Carter). adj. (of sugar cane) rotten; having ...
  • bosen
    See BOASSIN. ...
  • bosen
    See BOASSIN. ...
  • born
     /bohn/ [Atlantic; from past participle born] v. 1. to be born: Chillun borning (Brown 32). (Black) 2. [US dial. South idem ADD] to give birth ...
  • borry
    [also US dial. Gen., Black ADD] v. to borrow: We couldn't find we scrubber so we borry Con Nelly own (Andros). ...
  • boss
    [Car.; cf. Sra. basi excellent (Dillard 1976:34); from supremacy of the boss?] adj. excellent: 1978 Man, dat was a boss souse! (Dupuch 31). (Gen.) ...
  • boss, bossman
    [Car.; cf. SA baas master, sir "mode of address usu. by non-whites to the master or employer ... from Dutch baas master, captain"; cf. also ...
  • boss lady
    (Gen.); boss missus /bohs mísaz/ (Andros); Miss Boss (Nassau) [cf. BOSSMAN] n. 1. term of address to one's female employer.  2. a female employer: My boss ...
  • Boston
    (Eleu.), go Boston (Gen.) [OED, a game at cards, allied to whist, named after the siege of Boston] v. phr. (in whist) to get nearly ...
  • bother
    [OED, to annoy (a person)] v. to tamper with (a thing): The children used to bother this door so much when they passing and I ...
  • bottle
    [cf. GLASS BOTTLE idem and Haitian bouay (lit. bottle) idem HCEFD] n. broken glass: Bring Julie back before 'e get cut with bottle (Nassau). (Gen.) ...
  • bottle-and-nail
    n. a musical instrument: 1978 A bottle with a corrugated surface scraped by a metal stick. Generally the metal stick was a six-inch nail and ...
  • bottle cover
    n. bottle cap: No use to put the bottle cover back—the coke gon spoil (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • bottle dancing
    [cf. BOTTLE broken glass] n. dancing over broken glass with bare feet (originally associated with obeah, now a nightclub act for tourists): 1978 (Bethel 128). ...
  • bottle-lamp
    (Eleu., Mayag.); bottle-light (Andros) n. a beer or soda bottle filled with kerosene, with a rag forming a wick: They's catch the crab in the ...
  • bottle spider
    [from the shape of the red spot under the abdomen] n. the poisonous black widow spider, Latrodectus mactans: 1978 (Campbell 11). = BLACK SPIDER ...
  • Bottom: the Bottom
    [cf. US dial. South, Mid bottom low-lying, swampy land; a community in such an area, often poor DARE; US Black (Black) Bottom a run-down, disreputable ...
  • bottom-drying
    phr. drying out a boat's hull: 1977 Most of the dinghies were hauled out . . . to get a good bottom-drying (Albury 23). (Gen.) ...
  • bouf, boof
    /buf/ intj. 1. [W Car.; cf. Scots bouff to strike with the hand so as to cause a hollow sound CSD; US dial. biff to ...
  • bouf, boof (2)
    /buf/ n. [cf. BOUF intj.; cf. DAS biff an unsuccessfully played note on a brass instru-ment (Negro); also US dial. South boof a scare, fright ...
  • bouflacker
    /búflaka/ [etym?] n. a fish, Gerres cinereus, a large shad. (Cat) ...
  • boufoo
    /búfuw/ [from browned flour] n. a beverage resembling hot chocolate made from flour browned in a pot mixed with sugar and water. = BROWN FLOUR ...
  • bougainvillea
    /bowga(n)víliya, bowga(n)víli; buwga(n)víliya, buwga(n)víli; bunggavíliya/ [named after a Fr. navigator, Louis Antoine de Bougainville W3] n. bougainvillea, a woody vine with brilliant red or purple ...
  • bougaman (1), buggaman
    /búgamàn/ [cf. OED bogy phantom causing fright; also Brit. dial. boogyman (Orton L64), US dial. boogerman W3] n. a phantom evoked to frighten children: 1977 ...
  • bougaman (2)
    [cf. BOOGIE, BOOKER-MAN, etc.] n. nasal mucus (Eleu., Exuma, White) ...
  • boungy, boongy, bungy
     /búnggi/ [cf. W Car. bunki, bunggi idem (Holm 1978); probably from Brit. slang bung(hole) anus DHS, /bung/ in North, Mid dial.] n. buttocks (often an ...
  • boungy-banging
    [Cf. BOUNGY n.] n. phr. anal sex. (Black) ...
  • bougy-sticker
    See BANNY-SINKEL. ...
  • bow
    See BOAR, BORE. ...
  • bow-foots
    /baw futs/ [cf. nautical bow front (of ship)] n. forelegs, such as of a pig. cf. STAND-FOOTS, STERN-FOOTS Wayag.) ...
  • bow line
    /baw layn/ [cf. OED, rope to steady sails] n. an anchor line; a rope from the bow of a boat to the shore: 1936 Errybuddy ...
  • bowman
     /báwman/ [OED, oarsman nearest bow] n. harpooner, in bow of dinghy when fishing: The bowman have to get his share too (Andros). (Adelaide, Andros) ...
  • box cart
    [US two-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle DAB] n. a boy's coasting wagon, made of a wooden box mounted on wheels: 1936 He got one jaw buil' like ...
  • box fish
    [DJE idem] n. a fish of the famiy Ostraciontidae with a bony outer shell, varieties include the COW FISH and TRUNK FISH: 1934 The box-fish, a ...
  • boxing Josh
    [cf. DHS box the Jesuit to masturbate] n. masturbation: 1971 (McCartney 113). (Black) ...
  • box-man
    [cf. Scots box-master treasurer of a benefit society CSD] n. (at a church fund-raising CONCERT) the man who sits at the collection box (placed on ...
  • box o' ches'
    [from box + chest] n. a chest or trunk: 1918 Take de bunch o' key, open box o' ches' (PArsons 159), cf. CHISS (Black) ...
  • boy
    /bohy, boy/ [cf. Scots, a male person of any age and condition if unmarried and residing in the parental home; US dial. South a Negro ...
  • Boy Bookie slide
    [cf. B'O', BOOKY] n., Obs. a dance popular in the 1930's: 1976 Sweating dancers doing the "Boy Bookie slide" (Eneas 33) ...
  • boy-child
    [Pan-Creole; cf. Pap. mucha homber (lit. child man) idem (Loftman 1953:29); cf. Port. Cr. fiǰu-máča (lit, child male) idem (Meintel 1975:211); probably a calque on ...
  • boy days
    [cf. Scots laddie-days boyhood CSD] n. childhood; youth: In my boy-days. cf. GIRL DAYS (Black) ...
  • Boy Nasty
    [from B'O' ANANSI] n. a folk-tale hero: 1966 (Crowley 29). (Mayag.) ...
  • bra, bro', brush
    /bro/ [cf. B'] term of address to a male peer: Hey, bra, why you am' hail me yester-day? (Nassau). ...
  • braggadocious
    /brágadówshas/[cf. Guy. bragadosha showoff (Yansen 14); from BRAGGY, influenced by braggadocio + -ious forming adj.] adj. boastful. (Gen.) ...
  • braggard
    [OED, alternate form 1641, 1812; by analogy with -ard nouns (e.g. drunkard) or possibly from braggart by hypercorrection of devoiced final stops] n. braggart. (Eleu.) ...
  • braggy
    [cf. Scots idem CSD] adj. boastful: 1966 (Crowley 102).  I ain' like her—she too braggy (Nassau). (Gen.) ...
  • brainsy
    /bréynzi/ [W Car.; cf. co]loq. Eng. adj. formed from n. pl. + -y (e.g. gutsy, ballsy) and MCC brienz brain (Holm 1978)] adj. clever. (Eleu.) ...
  • bram
    [ Atlantic; imitative] intj. bang: 1936 Dey. . . . cut off d' engines an stop full, bram! (Dupuch 14). cf. BRIGGADUM-BRAM (Gen) ...
  • bramble
     [W Car.; N. Irel. dial. idem EDD] n. 1. dry twigs: They part the field off with bramble—this part will be mines and the next ...
  • branched calalu
    [DJE idem 1] n. 1. Obs? a plant, Solanum nodiflorum, night shade: 1889 Branched calalu . . . used by Obia men as a narcotic ...
  • brass: I brass
    [etym?] phr. (in playing KNUCKS HOLE with marbles) the announcement made after going from the first to the third hole and back again for the ...
  • brassliter
    /braslíyta/ [cf. Jam. /brazilíta/ D.TE; cf. OED braziletto and 17th century brasiletta from Sp., Port. brasilete Jamaica wood, diminutive of brasil Brazilwood DJE] n. braziletto, ...
  • brassly
    See BASSLY. ...
  • brass-wood
    [DAE idem, no sp.] n. a shrub, Anastraphia northropiana: 1905 (Shattuck 266). (White) ...
  • brawn
    /brohn/ n. 1. [W3 calloused skin obs.; OED idem not obs.] calloused skin on the foot. (Mayag.) 2. [OED flesh of the boar] the skin ...
  • brazen
    [Krio idem (Hancock p.c.); OED, shame-less] adj. (of girls) sexually precocious; promiscuous: These little girls too brazen—stead of doing the housework, they in the road ...
  • brazen girl (potato)
    /breyzan gyal/ [etym?] n. a variety of sweet potato. (Andros, Nassau) ...
  • braziletto
    See BRASSLITER. ...
  • bread
    [Car.; OED, a /oaf; a roll obs. → 1643] n. I. a loaf of bread; 1918 De nex' boy asked his mother to bake him ...
  • bread biscuit
    [cf. Sra. bredeboeskoetoe biscuit from bread WST; US dial. South bread biscuit ADD, Black biscuit bread (Dillard 1977:103); perhaps to distinguish US biscuit (Brit. scone) ...
  • breads
    [cf. US Black bread money (Major); cf. BDNE I bread idem] n. money (street talk): 1974 (King 26). (Black) ...
  • break (1), bruck
    v.t. [cf. BROKE] to cook (dried peas or beans) until soft or split. (Black) —v.i. (of dried peas or beans) to become soft or split: ...
  • break (2)
    adj. [cf. Gul. brek idem (Parsons 1923: 176); OED to become bankrupt ... now less usual; cf. also BROKE break—and a possible hypercorrection of the ...
  • breaker
    [OED nautical idem] n. a barrel or cask: We had to go to Raccoon Cay. . . supply water in our breaker carry down there ...
  • break night rest
    [W Car.] v. phr. to get up in the middle of the night. (Nassau) ...
  • break out
    v.t. to break open (a shell to remove the shellfish): 1978 Break out and clean whelks (Higgs 31). (Gen.) ...
  • break the reef
    v. phr. to develop breasts. (Andros, Mayag.) ...
  • break the seal
    [by analogy with packaging] v. phr. to have sexual intercourse with a virgin. (Black) ...
  • break-up
    [from broke break + hypercorrection of Eng. past participle] adj. broken-down: Down so by that old break-up house (Long). (Gen.) ...
  • breast
    n. /bres/ [Car.; OED properly said of women, but sometimes of the lower animals] (of animals) udder. (Black) ...
  • breast
    prep. /bres/ [from abreast of] next to; by: 1936 I wait till he get down brest o' Missa Franklin house (Dupuch 45). You gatty walk ...
  • breath
    /bret/ [cf. Gul. crack 'e bre't' open his mouth (to speak) (Gonzales 1924:22); cf. also Scots breath opinion; sentiments CSD] v. 1. to breathe: 1966 ...
  • bredda
    /bréda/ [Car.; Gul. idem (Gonzales 1922: 290)] n. brother (term of address to a male peer): [get two bredda what living (Andros). (Black) ...
  • breddedness
    [cf. Trin. broughtupsy idem (Winer p.c.); from well bred] n., Obs? good upbringing: 1929 She discovered in me signs of "breadedness" (Defries 116). ...
  • breed
    v. 1. [Car.; OED idem "now chiefly dial."] to be pregnant: 1918 She was breeding. . . and when she had baby, it was a ...
  • breeder
    [etym?] n. a boil on the skin. (White) ...
  • breeze
    Atlantic; from nautical usage; cf. also Reunion Cr. Fr. briz idem, also arch., nautical Fr. (Chaudenson 1974:711)] n. a wind, of any strength: [used in ...
  • bren
    (Black); bren-law (Eleu) [cf. Krio bran-lɔ idem KED; from brother-in-(law), but connotation that of Sp, cuñado or MCC waika] term of address or reference 1. ...
  • bret
    See BREATH. ...
  • briar root
    [W3 "The root of various plants (as. Rhododendron and Smilax app.) used in the manufacture of tobacco pipes"] n. a plant (sp?) used medicinally: Bush ...
  • briar tree
    n. shrub(s), variously identified: 1905 Calliandra haematoma (Shattuck 254). 1910 Terminalia spinosa (Northrop 171). 1977 Bucida spinosa (Patterson 19). cf. PRICKLY TREE (Gen.) ...
  • brickly top
    [cf. DAE brickley thatch brittle thatch or silver-top palmetto, Thrinax argentea; cf. US dial. South brickly brittle ADD] n. a variety of palm used in ...
  • bridal bush
    (Inagua); bride bush (Andros) [OED bride bush bush hung out at the village alehouse in honour of a wedding] n. a shrub (sp?) used medicinally. ...
  • briggadum-bram
    bruggadum-bram or -brum or -bam [Atlantic; cf. bragada(p), brigidi(m)-b(r)am(s) idem in WE, KED; "cf. Twi bìrim-(-birim) suddenly; ...
  • bright
    adj. 1. also bright-skin [US Black idem (Major); cf. OED "Sally she a ´Badian bright mulatto" 1910 sea shanty; cf. Ibo cháchá bright (of sun, ...
  • bright-bright
    [cf. BRIGHT] adj. (of persons) having a very light brown complexion: Now my sister, she bright-bright (Nassau). ...
  • Brilan
    /bráylan/ [by aphaeresis] n. Harbour Island, a cay off Eleuthera: 1936 'Brilan wuz all heat up 'bout dese 'lections (Dupuch 95). ...
  • brim (1)
    [cf. US Black brim a hat (Claerbaut)] n. a straw hat. (Black) ...
  • brim (2)
    [US Black idem (Walker 1956:135); as variant form also in OED, DAE, DJE] n. a fish, the bream. (Eleu) ...
  • bring down
    (US Black idem; help to sober a person (Major); DAS a critica or cutting remark; to depress, sadden; OED to lower, humble (no examples with ...
  • bring forth
    [cf. Car, bring out idem; OED, give birth to, last quot. 1668 but also Biblical (cf. Matthew 1:23)] v. to bear (offspring). (Black) ...
  • britches
    [cf. US dial. idem breeches, short trousers n.pl. W3] n. sing., pl. trousers: 1966 This britches (Crowley 99). (Eleu, White). ...
  • brittle thatch
    [DAE idem 1884 →] n. the silver-top palmetto, Thrinax argentea: 1788 Among the indigenous palms [are] Great Thatch and Brittle Thatch Palmetto, the leaves of ...
  • bro
    See B'. ...
  • broad (1)
    adj. (of feet) wide. (Exuma) ...
  • broad (2): talk broad
    [cf. OED broad used of a strongly marked dialectal or vulgar pronunciation ... Broad Cockney] phr. to speak a basilectal variety of Bahamian dialect. (Exuma) ...
  • broad-leaved wild pineapple
    [from the resemblance of the leaves to those of the pineapple] n., Obs. the cactuslike pinguin, Bromelia pinguin, related to the pineapple: 1835 (Journal 88). ...
  • broad-lip conch
    [cf. DJE broadleaf conch a variety of large conch whose shell opens out with a broad, leaflike appendage; cf. also Scots broad-lipped of a hat: ...
  • broad out
    (Black); broaden out (Nassau, Eleu.) [Car.; cf. Sra. bradi to spread WST; cf. OED broad v. obs. → 1399 and the more general tendency of ...
  • broil
    [OED, to cook (meat) by placing it on the fire, or on a gridiron over it; W3 to cook by direct exposure to radiant heat] ...
  • broke, bruck
    /brok/ [Atlantic; cf. Scots, Irel. dial. bruck break (Hancock 1971:155), also US dial. ADD] v. to break: 1918 My leg so small he may broke ...
  • broke corn
    [cf. Cam. brok-kɔ:n to harvest (corn) CCD; US dial. South breaking corn taking the ear of corn from the stalk (Ayers 1950:74)] v.phr. to pick ...
  • broke down
    [OED break down v.t. to crush or prostrate in strength, health] adj. phr. exhausted: I come home all broke down and tied (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • broken English
    [OED broken of language: imperfectly spoken, with the syntax incomplete] n. local creolized English, called Bahamian dialect: We Bahamians does speak broken English (Nassau). (Gen.) ...
  • broke off
    [cf. BROKE break; OED break off to start obs. 1591 only] v.phr. to begin suddenly: 1966 He broke off running [i.e. began to run] (Crowley ...
  • bro-man
    [cf. BRO brother + MAN, both terms of address] term of address for a male peer: 1966 (Crowley 49). (Black) ...
  • broom bush
    n. 1. [OED different sp.] a plant: 1920 Gundlachia corymbosa (Britton 442). 1977 Baccharis dioica (Patterson 120). = HORSE BUSH 3, SOLDIER'S BUSH (Gen.) 2. ...
  • brown ebony
    [W3 different sp.] n. a tree, Pera humeliaefolia: 1905 (Shattuck 257). (Mayag.) ...
  • brown-eyes
    [cf. EYES eye] n. a bruised eye: A brown-eyes. = BUST EYE (Mayag.) ...
  • brown (flour) tea
    (Black); brown flour soup (Nassau, Mayag.) n. a hot drink made by brown-ing flour in a pot, then mixing in sugar and water: You brown ...
  • brown-paper roll
    [from preparation] n. a cigarette hand-rolled in brown wrapping paper. (Gen.) ...
  • brown racer
    [W3 racer any of various snakes ... as black racer, blue racer] n. a snake, Alsophis vudii, harmless to humans: 1978 (Campbell 9). = GRASS ...
  • brown sage
    [cf. W3 red sage, DJE purple sage, both Lantana sp.] n. a shrub (sp?) with grayish leaves and fragrant lavender flowers. (Gen.) ...
  • brown-skin
    [Atlantic] adj. mulatto; having a light-brown complexion: 1936 I see won 'Merican woman wid her hair all curl up. Right nex' t' her I see ...
  • brown (somebody) up
    [cf. W3 brownnose (from the implication that servility is tantamount to having one's nose in the anus of the person from whom advancement is sought) ...
  • brown thrasher
    /brawn trasha/ (Black); brown thrusher (White) [cf. BLUE THRASHER] n. the mockingbird, Mimus polyglottos: 1910 (Northrop 52). = ENGLISH THRASHER (Gen.) ...
  • bruck
    See BROKE. ...
  • bruggudum
    See BRIGGADUM. ...
  • bruh
    See BRA ...
  • bruise
    [OED, to pound, crush; to beat small, grind down] v. 1. to mash corn in a mortar for grits. (Mayag.) 2. to make (meat, conch, ...
  • bruiser
    [cf. BRUISE 2] n. 1. an instrument for making conch tender, usually a foot-long wooden club or a soft-drink bottle. (White) 2. a club for ...
  • brush
    See TAR BRUSH. ...
  • bubba
    /bóba/ [Gul. idem (Gonzales 1922:291) or younger brother; cf. Krio bobo little boy (Hancock p.c.); cf. US dial. bub, bubby, bubber brother, used especially in ...
  • bubu
    See BOOBOO. ...
  • bubby
    /bóbi/ [Atlantic; OED obs. or dial. 1725; cf. also Scots bubbies CSD, W3 bobby, booby idem] n. 1. a woman's breasts (considered vulgar). (Gen.) 2. ...
  • buck
    [OED, a gay dashing fellow ... used also as a form of familiar address ... vulgarly applied to a nego man; cf. SA bok lover, ...
  • buckly whitey
    [from lignum vitae] n. 1. the lignum vitae tree, Guiacum officinale. = LIGDUM VITAE, NIGLUM VITAE (Andros) 2. a tree (sp?) resembling the lignum vitae, ...
  • bucko
    n. important man: He was one of the buckos in there next to the manager (White) ...
  • buckra
    /bókra/ [Atlantic; US dial. South idem ADD; cf. lbo, Efik mbakára white man; he who surrounds or governs (Turner 1949:191)] n. 1. Obs, a white ...
  • buckra sweet potato
    [cf. BUCKRA and DJE backra yam a fine or delicate variety of yam] n. a variety of sweet potato with white skin. (Andros, San Sal., ...
  • buck (up)
    [Atlantic; OED dial. & US (?corruption of butt); possible convergence with Wolof baŋ ke to collide with (Turner 1949:60)] v. 1. to collide with: 1966 ...
  • buck-up
    [cf. BUCK (UP)] n. (of cars, etc.). a collision (Gen.) all buck-up go: anything goes: 1936 (Dupuch 121). All that buck-up go in this rush ...
  • bud (1)
    /bod/ [cf. Guy. bud-bud, birdie penis of a small boy (Rickford 1976:8); cf. Common Bantu *-bódò penis (Carter); note also possible calque on bird parallel ...
  • bud (2)
     [W3, something likened to a bud, esp. in shape] n. an individual clump of hair forming a braid (usually in reference to men's dread locks), ...
  • bud
    v. [OED, to begin to grow] to begin to develop breasts: She buddin'. cf. SPUDDIN' (POTATOES) (Exuma) ...
  • bud grass
    [from BIRD GRASS, BUR GRASS] n. 1. bird grass, Cenchrus echinatus, a grass with burs (older pronunciation). = BIRD GRASS, BUR GRASS (Mayag.) 2. a ...
  • bud pepper
    See BIRD PEPPER ...
  • buffalo
    /bófala/ [convergence with the seman-tically unrelated Eng. word seems coincidental; the phonological shape probably derives from an African form such as Yoruba bu moldy DYL ...
  • buffy
    [etym?; cf. TOFFY idem] n. dried coconut. (Andros) ...
  • bugaman, buggaman
    See BOUGAMAN ...
  • buggy
    (Crooked); wheel buggy (Cat) [OED buggy a light one-horse vehicle but cf. DAS Irish (baby) buggy a wheelbarrow] n. a wheelbarrow: 1963 I had also ...
  • build
    /bil/ v. 1. [W Car.; by passivization] to be built: Dat church buil' in 1936 (Nassau). (Black) 2. [Jam. idem (Cassidy p.c.)] to make (clothes): ...
  • Buildings
    Traditionally most DWELVING HOUSES in the Bahamas have been modest. Only wealthy people can afford an UPSTAIRS HOUSE with GABLE-ENDS high enough for a CEILING ...
  • build up
     /bil op/ [W Car.] v.phr. (of weather) to prepare to storm: 1969 One squall buillin' up (Dupuch 11). (Gen.) ...
  • build up for broke down
    phr. to expect too much, thus ensuring disappointment: When you 'spect too much from you chirren, all you doing is building up yourself for broke ...
  • bul, bulla, buller
    /ból(a)/ [OED bully dial. brother, companion] n. term of address to an older brother or a respected male peer: 1918 Bul Rabbit . . . ...
  • bull cat
    See BOAR CAT. ...
  • bull dog
    [cf. BOAR , by hypercorrection] n. a male dog: 1950 In common parlance a jibdog is the female of the species in contrast to the ...
  • bull shark
    n. a shark, Carcharhinus leucas: 1968 (Böke 18). (Gen.) ...
  • bull-skate
    [cf. US Black bullskating to brag (Major); cf. OEDS II bullshit to bluff, and skite North. dial. cognate of shit (Cassidy p.c.)] v. 1. to ...
  • bull vine
    n. a plant, Cissus microcarpa or C. intermedia: 1905 (Shattuck 259). cf. BILL VINE (Black)  ...
  • bully
    [DJE idem squirrelfish; OED dial, name for some kind of fish] n. live TURBOT used as bait in deep-sea fishing. (Andros, Exuma) ...
  • bully (net)
    [cf. Gul. "net (bullet all aroun')" (Parsons 1923:167) from use of lead shot to weight net?; cf. also OED bully to overweigh (of ships)] n. ...
  • bully rim
    n. the circular wire frame which supports the BULLY NET: You hang the bully-rim on the staff (Andros).  ...
  • bumble-fly
    [cf. BOOMBA FLY, influence by bumble, to buzz, as a fly OED] n. an insect (sp?) resembling a gnat which is attracted to sores: 1966 ...
  • bump
    n. [W3, a swelling of tissue usually resulting from a bump; cf. Brit. colloq. bumps acne] a swelling caused by acne: The girl get plenty ...
  • bump
    v. [W3 bump breast] to begin to develop breasts: She bumpin'. (Black) bump up phr. I. (of peanuts and potatoes) to develop tubers. (Andros) 2. ...
  • bun
    /bon/ [cf. Cam. bɔ:n-am to roast CCD, US Black burn to cook food (Major)] v. to fry (not necessarily to excess): When the peas done ...
  • bun-bun
    [Atlantic; BUN + reduplication] n. burnt food on the bottom of the pot (considered a delicacy). = POTCAKE I, SWINGE n. (Mayag.) ...
  • bunch
    [W Car.] n. a banana stem with nine or more HANDS or clusters. (Gen.) ...
  • bunday
    /bondéy/ [etym. uncertain; Crowley (1966:20) suggests Port. bom dia good day, or Fr. bon Dieu the good Lord; S. Norton (p.c.) derives it from one ...
  • bungy
    See BOUNGY ...
  • bunny-sickle
    See BANNY-SINKLE. ...
  • bunwood
    [cf. BUN + wood] n. charcoal. (Black) ...
  • buoy
    /bwohy/ [Car.; cf. Jam. bwai DJE] n. boy, man: Dats da two buoy (Brown 33). cf. BOY (San Sal., Mayag.) ...
  • bur
    See B'. ...
  • bur grass
    [W Car.] n. a plant, Cenchrus echinatus, the sand bur: 1889 (Gardner 361). = BIRD GRASS, BUD GRASS, PRICKLE GRASS (Gen.) ...
  • burn (1)
    n. [cf. OED, burden, obs. exc. dial → ,1614; Brit. Dial. North, West burn a burden, load, bundle, esp. a load of sticks, straw, etc. EDD; ...
  • burn (2)
     n. [by hypercorrection; cf. BUN burn] bun: 1895 Twelve burns (sweet cakes) vw'at vwas in de hoven (Edwards 96). (Mayag.) ...
  • burn, bun
     /bo(r)n/ v. [Car.; cf. DJE burn to rub off the skin] 1. to rub off the skin: 1940 De feller who get he skin all ...
  • burn bad-lamp
    (Mayag.); burn candle (Black) [cf. DJE bad candle idem; cf. Reunion Cr. Fr. "Le sorcier 'fait brûller des bougies' bril buzi] " (Chaudenson 1974:146); a ...
  • burning out
    v. phr. burning off a field to clear it: After burning out the field, you should plant with the next rain (COB). ...
  • burning stick
    [W Car.] n. a torch. (Black) ...
  • burn up: get burn up
    [from one's consumption of energy] v.phr. 1. to become exhausted through physical exertion. (Black) 2. to drop out of a race due to exhaustion. (San ...
  • burst
    /boys/ [ in reference to ejaculation; cf. Krio wata bos 'water bursts': water comes out in a spate, suddenly and unexpectedly KED] v. (of men) ...
  • bus'
    See BUS(T). ...
  • bush
    n. 1. [Atlantic; OED "(Recent, and probably a direct adoptation of the Dutch bosch in colonies originally Dutch) applied to the uncleared or untilled districts in the ...
  • bush: go in the bush
    (Gen.); go to bush (Andros) [cf. Cam. go bush idem CCD] v.phr. to defecate. (Gen.) ...
  • bush: go wild in the bush
    v.phr. (of whites) to have sexual relations with blacks. (Nassau, San Sal.) ...
  • bush bath
    /bush baht/ [Car.; cf. BUSH 4] n. a hot bath in infusions made from medicinal herbs. (Gen.) ...
  • bush broom
    [cf. Cam. bush-brum raffia broom CCD; US dial. South brush broom a broom made by binding small branches together for sweeping the yard WSC] n. ...
  • bush doctor
    [Car.; cf. BUSH 4 ; cf. also Haitian dòtkè fey idem HCEFD ] n. 1. a practitioner of herbal remedies. = BUSH MAN (Gen.) 2. ...
  • bushel off
    [from measurement] v.phr. to put (crops) into bushel baskets. (Mayag.) ...
  • bushels
    n. sing. or pl. bushel: 1918 One bushels of corn (Parsons 49). ...
  • bush fence
    [W Car.] n. a row of prickly plants to separate fields. (Gen.) ...
  • bush man
    [W Car.; cf. BUSH 4] n. 1. an herbalist. 2. an OBEAH MAN. = BUSH DOCTOR (Gen.) ...
  • bush mechanic
    [cf. SA idem, a very rough and ready workman] n. an inexpert tinkerer; an automobile repairman with no mechanical training or talent. (Black). ...
  • bush medicine
    [Car. cf. BUSH 4] n. herbal remedies; obeah charms: 1966 (Otterbeim 60). (Gen.) ...
  • bush-runner
    [cf. BUSH 1 and DAE bushwhacker take to the bush] n. a person living in an otherwise uninhabited area. (San Sal.) ...
  • bush snail
    n. a land snail, Hemitrochus varians: 1978 (Campbell 90). ...
  • Bush Medicine
    Modern DOCTOR MEDICINE was traditionally often difficult to obtain on the more remote Bahamian islands, and it was often prohibitively costly even for those living ...
  • bush tea
     [Car.; SA idem; cf. BUSH 4] n. an infusion made from wild herbs, usually medicinal: 1888 What they call bush tea is their sovereign remedy ...
  • bushy beard grass
    [from appearance] n. a coarse grass, Andropogon glomeratus: 1920 (Britton 14). = BED GRASS (Nassau) ...
  • business
    [Atlantic; DJE "evid. by abbr. of have business"] v. to be usual or appropriate: 1978 Y'ain 't bizness t' bite d' man on he knee-cap. ...
  • bussard
    /bósad/ [cf. OED idem obs.→ 1700's] n. the buzzard or turkey vulture. (Eleu.) ...
  • bus(t)-eye
    /bos ay/ [cf. Krio bos yay idem KED] n. a bruised or black eye. = BROWN EYE (Black) ...
  • bus(t)-open
    /bos ówpn/ adj. wide open (also metaphorical): 1936 a bus' open race (Dupuch 74). (Gen.) —v. to assault: 1940 He gone so far as to ...
  • bus(t) out
    /bos awt/ [Gul. idem (Gonzales 1924: 192)] v.phr. to leave suddenly; run off: Them guys when you see them all you do is bus' out ...
  • bus(t) up
    /bos op/ [cf. Vir. idem (Roy 1974); Krio boses idem KED; also Scots bust to beat CSD, US bust to punch W3] v.phr. to give ...
  • buttercup
    [OED, W3 different sp.] n. a medicinal plant with yellow flowers: 1905 Turnera ulmifolia (Shattuck 207). 1920 Tribulus cistoides (Britton 202). (Gen.) ...
  • butterfly flower
    [cf. DJE butterfly tree (Bauhina sp.) "from the resemblance of their bi-lobed leaves to the half-spread wings of a butterfly"] n. a tree, Bauhinia sp., ...
  • butter for fat
    [cf. Krio bota-fo-lad tit for tat KED] phr. like for like: 1925 Tick for tack, butter for fat; You kill my dog, I'll kill your ...
  • butter hamlet
    n. a fish, Hypoplectrus puella: 1968 (Böhlke 274). (Black) ...
  • butt up
    [hypercorrection of BUCK UP] v.phr. to encounter: 1918 You goin' to butt up again' a lot o' trouble (Parsons 34). ...
  • by (1)
    [also Bajan (Collymore 25), Gul. ADD] conj. since: 1966 By you's the man, I'll let you go (Crowley 113). (Black) -prep. [Car,; OED, at the ...
  • by (2)
    [from use as prep, introducing non-embedded participial phrases; NYC idem (Hunter student essays)] participial phrase marker: By him allowing her to come into his life ...
  • by-(and)-by
    /bay(m)bay/ [Atlantic; cf. DJE bambai, Brit. dial. West bamby EDD, US dial. South bimeby WEA] adv. later; in a little while: 1917 By-by the string ...
  • by-talk
    [cf. OED by-talk 1. small talk; 2. obs. → 1579 by-word, pet phrase] n. 1. a piece of information by hearsay: I didn't see it ...