D

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • da(1)
    [Car.; from that] demonstrative pron., adj.: Da' boy. (Exuma) ...
  • da(2)
    [Car.] prep. (of location or direction) to, at, in, on. (Nassau) ...
  • da(3)
    [Car.; DJE: "prob. fr. de to be (located) + a introducer, but cf. Twi da lie, be situated...A word introducing statements and giving them emphasis: ...
  • da(4)
    See DE2. ...
  • dada
    /dáda/ [Vir. da idem (Highfield); OED, child's word for father, but cf. also Fon dada grandfather (Turner 1949:70)] n. a term of address more often ...
  • daddy
    [W Car.; Gul. idem (Gonzales 1922:284)] n. a title or term of address for a respected, older man (not related): I seen Daddy Thompson walking ...
  • damson plum
    [Car.; DJE "fr. the resemblance of the fruit to a damson plum" (Prunus insititia)] n. a tree, Chrysophyllum oliviforme, or its fruit: 1889 (Gardner 390). ...
  • dan-dan
    [Car.; DJE "prob. fr. dandy by iteration of first syllable, but cf. Yoruba dãdã good, beautiful"] n. a child's dress. (Abaco) ...
  • dander
    (Eleu., White); danders (Mayag.); dandrus (Black) [cf. Krio danda dandruff (Hancock p.c.); cf. Brit. dial. North, West dander slight scurf on the skin EDD; dandro ...
  • Danish
    (Black); Daney starch (San Sal.) [etym. unknown, but cf. Daney nickname for a Danish-American (James Holm p.c.)] n. a plant, Echites echites, with potato-like roots ...
  • dar
    See DE2 ...
  • dark water
    [cf. Cam, blæk wata deep pool CCD] n. deep water. cf. WHITE WATER (Black) ...
  • darling plum
    /dáhlin plom/ (Gen.); dorlin or dolling plum/dóhlin plum! (Andros) [cf. OED darling apple obs. —>1586] n. a tree, Reynosia septentrionalis, having edible black fruit with ...
  • da's
    See THA'S. ...
  • dash
    [DJE "In common use in Jamaica where throw, fling and other words would be preferred elsewhere] v. 1. to throw: 1895 She dash anudder hegg ...
  • daughter
    [cf. Jam. Rasta "dawta, daughta: girlfriend, girl; woman, female companion; wife; name given to any young woman" (Pollard 1980: 18)] n. a term of address ...
  • day: in the day
    phr. during the day; in the day-time: She does sew straw bags in the day (Nassau). (Gen.) ...
  • day clean, day clear
    [Pan-Creole; "cf. Fr. Cr. ju netyé jour nettoyé (D. Taylor). Daybreak" DJE; a calque on an African idiom, e.g. Wolof ber bu sεt dawn (lit. ...
  • dead
    adv. [Atlantic; Brit. dial. idem EDD] extremely: 1966 I dead hungry (Crowley 110). Dead high.. .dead hungry (Exuma). That old woman skin dead stretchy (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • dead out
    [W Car.] phr. to die (off): I could remember some of um now. . .plenty of de ole one, dey dead out (Long). (Black) ...
  • dead dress
    [cf. dead adv. + dress dressed up; cf. Gul. dress to det (Writers' Program 1940:16)] phr. extravagantly dressed; dressed to kill: 1966 (Crowley 102). (Black) ...
  • dead house
    [Atlantic; Brit. dial. North idem EDD] n. 1. a morgue: After that they take the dead to the dead house (Andros). (Gen.) 2. a house ...
  • dead limb
    [Car.] n. a fruit-tree branch which does not bear although it may be alive. (Mayag., White) ...
  • dead man
    [cf. nautical dead men rope ends hanging over the side of a boat DSS] n. 1. mucus running from the nose. (Adelaide, Rum Cay) 2. ...
  • dead-man-get-up
    [alluding to efficacy] n. a medicinal plant. ...
  • dead-man-strength
    [from supposed power to raise the dead, or from a form like FOUR-MAN-STRENGTH plant sp.; cf. also Brit. dial. North dead man's grief a plant ...
  • dead-people bird
    [said to inhabit cemeteries; it is an omen of a death in the family for one to land in the yard] n. the smooth-billed ani, ...
  • dead-people flowers
    [cf. FLOWERS flower; from use on graves] n. 1. bougainvillea. 2. oleander. 3. baby's breath. 4. a plant with purple flowers and thick leaves: Dey dead-people ...
  • dead skin
    [from resemblance to dead human skin?] n. the white layer under the peel of citrus fruits. = DEAD MAN ...
  • Death
    "SEND FOR FEALY!" (a Nassau undertaker) is a humorous cry when someone gets sick or faints. If the SICK is actually ON DYING, however, the ...
  • death bird
    [see quot.] n. 1. a bird, Antrostomus carolensis: 1880 Death bird. . .My guide stated that a few months before, the bird had appeared to ...
  • death make no promise
    [i.e. appointment] n. phr.death can strike at any time. <Nassau> ...
  • death messenger
    [from belief that it foretells death] n. a black bird. cf. DEAD-PEOPLE BIRD, DEATH BIRD, GRAVEYARD BIRD, SPIRIT BIRD. ...
  • decide your mind
    v. phr. to make a decision: So I decide my mind to sell them that (Andros). ...
  • deep
    adj. 1. [Pan-Creole; cf. Krio dip "of language: supposedly pure, unadulterated, original" KED; Port. Cr. of Guine-Bissau "un creole dit fundu (profond)" (Kihm 14) cf. ...
  • deep English
    [Car,;cf. DEEP 1] n. standard English: Some talk like deep English and some talks just similar to how I talk (White). ...
  • deep-hole grass
    n. a grass used medicinally: These grass grow in hole and we call it deep-hole grass. Give him two draught of that or three-cough gone! ...
  • deep sounding
    [cf. W3 sounding measurement of depth, as by line and plummet] n. the water beyond the drop-off dividing shallow from deep water. cf. EDGE OF THE ...
  • deer grouper
    n. a fish, a variety of whitish GROUPER found out on banks. ...
  • dem
    See THEM, -THEM. ...
  • devil dance
    [W Car.; cf. US Black devil dancing dancing as an expression of animal spirits vs. holy dancing WSC; probably an old term: cf. Brit. dial. ...
  • devil shoestring
    ; devil('s) vine [cf. US Black devil's shoestring idem (Dillard 1977:116)] n. a plant, Tephrosia virginiana, with a strong, wiry root running like a ...
  • devil(&#39;s) plum
    n. a plant, Solanum havanense, with berries said to be poisonous: (Shattuck 263). = OLD MAN'S PLUM ...
  • devil(&#39;s) potato (root)
    n. a vine, Echites umbellata or E. echites, with spongy tubers used for laundry starch: 1910 (Northrop 175). = DANISH, RUBBER VINE, WILD POTATO ...
  • devil(&#39;s) pumpkin
    n. a kind of passion flower, Passiflora cupraea: 1920 (Britton 289). = WILD WATERMELON ...
  • devil(&#39;s) tail, devil(&#39;s) whip
    [cf. DJE devil('s) horse (or riding) whip, Achryanthes indica or A. aspera] n.a plant with long branches and barbed leaves, used medicinally. ...
  • devil umbrella
    [cf. MCC devil cup idem; cf. LA Fr. paresol djab, Pap. parasol di diabo, CA Sp. paragüitas del diablo, all 'mushroom' (Thompson 1958)] n. mushroom = ...
  • Dickens potato
    [possibly related to digging; cf. WHAT THE DIGGIN'S] n. a reddish-orange variety of sweet potato. ...
  • dicky
    n. 1. [cf. DHS dick membrum virile + -y (diminutive suffix)] penis (word used by older children).   2. [etym] a variety of squirrelfish, Epinephelus punctatus. CONEY ...
  • dicty
    [US dial. South idem "Proud, haughty. Urban Negroes apply this term to bright mulattoes who try to pass for white" WSC; "well dressed, elegant, snobbish, ...
  • did, di
    [Car.; from did as auxiliary verb converging with African anterior marker(s) of similar form, e.g. Yoruba ti (Rowlands 1969a:169) which, like Bah. did and Haitian ...
  • different
    [Prov. idem (Washabaugh 1980:29); from difference, construed as a pl.] n. difference: 1966 The king don't know the different of the gold from ivory (Crowley ...
  • dig
    [OED, to obtain by excavation] v. to dig up: 1918 He will return back to big a bag of money (Parsons 133). <Gen.> ...
  • diggin&#39;s: what the diggins
    [from dickens, influenced by dig] phr. an exclamation of surprise. <Black>   ...
  • dig your mouth
    [cf. PICK YOUR MOUTH idem] phr.  to extract information by engaging a person in conversation. ...
  • dilders
    [etym; perhaps related to dildo cactus by similarity of pinch to thorn prick] n. a small black crab. =GAULIN CRAB, JUMBY CRAB, PAMMY GAULINY ...
  • Dinah
    [from the name] n. a stupid, promiscuous girl. ...
  • dill-seed
    [OED dill...cultivated for its carminative fruits or "seeds"] n. dill, an herb (Anethum graveolens): 1910 (Northrop 173). ...
  • dinny
    [cf. Kongo nzini vagina (Carter)] n. female genitals (child's word). = DUNNY ...
  • dip
    [Car.] v. to meddle: 1963 I don' want non o' yinna dippin' in muh private affairs (Dupuch 53). <Gen.> ...
  • dilly
    [from SAPODILLA, from Sp. zapotillo, diminutive of zapote, from Nahuagl tzapotl W3] n. the sapodilla tree, Achras zapota, and its fruit: 1966 When he get ...
  • dildo, doldo
    [cf. DJE dildo "two sp. of cactus so named for their phallic shape (Cereus peruvianus and C. gracilis)"] n. a cactus: 1889 Dildo...Cereus swartzii (Gardner 384). 1905 ...
  • dingy
    /dìnji/ [cf. US dial. dingy a negro ADD; US Black dinge idem (Eliason 1938:152); DHS dingy Christian a mulatto; anyone with some Negro blood vs. ...
  • dipner
    /dípna/ [cf. Brit. dial, North, Mid dip a sweet sauce, usually eaten with ouddings EDD; US dial. South idem ADD] n. a kind of gruel. ...
  • dirt
    [Car.; DJE "corrected" from dutty (soil, earth) n. soil; earth but no implication of filth: You need good black dirt for tomatoes (Nassau). <Gen.>     ...
  • dirt-eating
    [W Car,;US dial. South idem WEA] n. geophagy, or the habitual eating of clay from melancholia or malnutrition. <Eleu.,Mayag.> ...
  • dirt-house
      [W Car.; cf. Haitian kay te idem (Gaujean p.c.)] n. a house with an earthen floor. (Black)     ...
  • dirty
    /dóti, dóyti/ [Atlantic; DJE "dutty...fr. Twi dçtè soil, earth, clay mud; infl. by Engl. dirt, dirty"; it is unclear if last refers also to the ...
  • disagreeable
    [OED, not in agreement obs.→1766] adj. in disagreement: 1966 The four sons was disagreeable. None wasn't agree with how their daddy share their land (Crowley 120). ...
  • discouraging
    [W Car] adj. discouraged. I was very discouraging when I did not pass the BJC [Bah. Junior Certificate exam] (COB). <San Sal., Mayag.> ...
  • diskiver
    [cf. kiver cover] v. to discover: 1966 They diskiver (discover) the butter they left (Crowley 83). ...
  • dismiss
    [by passivization] v. (of schools) to be dismissed. School dismiss at three o' clock (Nassau). <Black> ...
  • ditty
    [OED, any composition in verse, obs.→1614; cf, also Scots ditty a story CSD] n. a story: 1895 So dat's de end o' dat ditty [referring ...
  • dive, dive up
    [Car.] v. 1. to dive into the water and bring something up: 1895 T'row de bunch o' bananas overboar' an den who could dive de ...
  • dive conch
    [cf. DIVE (UP), from the downward nodding of the head; cf. LA Fr. plongè Iambi (lit. dive conch) somnoler en oscillant de la ttte (Germain ...
  • dividement
    [divide + -ment] n. 1. a division (into portions): 1966 make dividement of each of the food (Crowley 121). 2. something serving to divide: A ...
  • do
    v. 1. [Atlantic, DAS idem] to harm: That bug won't do you nothing (Nassau). (Black) 2. [Car.] to harm by witchcraft: Somebody do me so ...
  • doadus
    /dówdas/ ; doady /dówdi/ [etym. uncertain but cf. 1811 DVT diddleys a woman's breasts] n. sing. breast (a family word): My right doadus (Exuma). cf. ...
  • doctor
    [W CAR.] n. an OBEAH man: The doctor live next to City Market...put bottles in his tree [as a guard] (Nassau). cf. BUSH DOCTOR ...
  • doctor bird
    [Car.; DJE "from the bird's dark plumage and from its habit of 'lancing' flowers with its long beak] n. the humming bird: 1960 (Bond 133). ...
  • doctor bush
    [in reference to its medicinal use] n. a plant, Plumbago scandens: 1920 (Britton 319). ...
  • doctor fish
    [Car.; cf. Sra. datra idem WST, LA Fr. chirurgien idem (Jourdain 33); DJE "from the pair of sharp spines (likened to the doctor's lance) at ...
  • doctor fly
    [W Car.; cf. Brit. dial. North doctor horse-fly "Children used to catch a cleg and hold it on the back of the hand until it ...
  • doctor medicine
    [Krio idem KED] n. remedies prescribed by a licensed physician, as opposed to BUSH MEDICINE: 1978 It is an old Bahamian belief that there is ...
  • doctor&#39;s gum
    [DJE idem; from medicinal use] n. a tree, Rhus metopium, with acrid sap: 1889 (Gardner 374). = FALSE HOG GUM ...
  • doctor shark
    [perhaps by association with nurse] n. a variety of NUSS. ...
  • doctor shop
    [Car,;cf. Brit. dial. North doctor shop a surgery EDD] n. a pharmacy: 1978 Missa George Cole doctor shop (Dupuch 31). <Mayag.> ...
  • doctor snake
    [etym?] n. a snake: Doctor snake will pitch on you.  (Andros, Crooked) ...
  • docy
    /dówsi/ [etym] n. a woman's breast. = DOADUS, DOODER ...
  • dodge
    [W Car., OED, to follow stealthily, and with shifts to avoid discovery] v. to duck out of sight: 1918  When dey see de boy, de ...
  • does
    /doz, az, z/ [Car.; this form probably derives from an African habitual marker such as Ewe a WES or Yoruba maa (Rowlands 1969a:61), becoming a ...
  • dog
    See DUG. ...
  • dog-bed
    n. a child's security blanket, especially one that has become soiled or smells of urine. <Exuma> ...
  • dog-bush
    n.  a plant, Baccharis angustifolia: 1889 (Gardner 387). <San Sal> ...
  • dog-drink-water
    [etym] n.  a plant, Tillandsia fasciculata: 1910 (Northrop 144). <Inagua, Mayag.> ...
  • doggy
    [cf. US Black puppy small penis (Folb)] n. penis (child's word; considered naughty): All them girls get crabby but they does ack like they get ...
  • doggy after someone
    [cf. W3 dog v. follow indefatigably] v. phr. to follow someone about constantly: That child always doggyin' after his daddy (Nassau). <Black> ...
  • dog-teeth snapper
    [cf. DJE idem "from its having teeth like those of dogs (Messoprion cynodon, Lutjanus jocu)"; US dog-snapper same sp. (Allyn 1967:66)] n. a fish. <Black> ...
  • dog up under someone
    [cf. doggy after, and the ingratiating tactics of a dog; also US dog up to roll a marble to a more advantageous position (Harder 1955:16) ...
  • dogwood
    [W Car,; OED, W3 different sp.] n. a tree, Piscidia piscipula, with pinkish-white flowers and brown pods: 1977 (Patterson 105). <Gen.> ...
  • dollar
    [cf. Brit. dial. North, Mid dollar a five-shilling piece EDD] n. a four-shilling banknote: 1788 A Spanish dollar is worth. . .4 sh. 8 d. ...
  • doll-baby
    [Atlantic; US dial. South idem ADD; n. a doll: I still keep an old doll-baby on my bed (COB). <Gen.> ...
  • doll bush
    n. a shrub, Fagara flava: 1905 (Shattuck 256). cf. SATINWOOD ...
  • done
    /don/ preverbal marker. [Atlantic; this form probably derives from an African completive marker such as Mandingo tun (Dalby 1972:180) converging with English done; cf. OED ...
  • done-done
    [completive DONE + DONE v. 3] adj. overcooked: This fish taste stink. It mussy done-done (Nassau). ...
  • done-grow
    [completive DONE + grow] adj.  short of stature; runty: He twenty-nine an' four foot nine, so errybody say he done-grow (Nassau). You done-grown bitch! (Nassau). ...
  • donkey thistle
    n. a plant, Argemone mexicana, with oragne or yellow flowers: 1920 (Britton 145). =THISTLE ...
  • donkey weed
    [DJE idem "like thyme, good for tea"] n. a plant used as a medicine for foot sores by drinking or direct application. ...
  • donkey years
    ; donkey days [cf. YEARS ear; a pun on the long ears of donkeys and the idiom LONG YEARS; the link is no longer apparent ...
  • don&#39;t
    [Car.; cf. US Black don't supposed to, don't got, etc.; also "We don' on nat chapter" (Loman 1967:94); an invariant negator masking NA, No] negator, ...
  • don&#39;t-care, don&#39;t-care-&#39;f-I, donkeyfy
    dóhngki(fay)/ [cf. Atlantic don't-care casual (Hancock 1969: 44); cf. Sra. donkedonke unconcerned WST, Bajan dontcarish (Collymore 40), Guy. doan-kay-damn (Rickford 1976:12); also US dial. South ...
  • dooder
    /dúwda/ [pl. dooders; cf. DOADUS] n. a woman's breast. (Andros, Long, White) ...
  • doody
    /dúwdi/ [cf. Car. duudu idem, also Brit. DJE; cf. US Black do-do (Walker 1956: 117); NYC doody idem (from Do your duty?) in doody-head etc. (M. Klein p.c.)] ...
  • doof
    /duwf/ [from dwarf] n. a short person: A person who short we could call a little short doof (Nassau). ...
  • de (2)
    /de/; dere, da, dare preverbal progressive marker [Atlantic; cf. DE1and African aspect markers such as Twi progressive "formed with the prefix re (originally de, to be)" (Christaller ...
  • de (1)
    /de/; dere, there copula [Atlantic; DJE "from there, DE, which takes the place of the omitted verb to be—poss. also with coincidental influ­ence from some African word ...
  • dinghy
    /dinggi/ (San Sal.); ding-a-ling (Black) [cf. TING-A-LING; cf. US dial. South ding-a-ling  idem (. Northam p.c.); DHS dingle-dangle idem] n. penis (child's word). ...
  • doorkeeper
    [cf. doorman, gatekeeper] n. door-man; attendant at doors, as at a supermarket: That door-keeper like look at people hard (Nassau). ...
  • door-mouth
    [Atlantic; an African calque: cf, Yoruba enu ìloro (lit, mouth porch) threshold (Oyedeji p.c.), Hausa baki mouth, entrance DIE; cf. also Mandinka bonda, Bambara da, ...
  • die
    [by hypercorrection of DEAD to die] adj. dead: 1918 If you ever eat one of dem fruit, you be die (Parsons 1480. (Black) ...
  • dose
    [i.e. of BUSH MEDICINE; cf. also Haitian this Potion TDKF] n. an evil spell: Put a dose on him (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • dot
    [probably from dirt] n. excrement. (Andros, San Sal.) —v. to defecate. (Andros, San Sal.) ...
  • double bank
    [Car.; cf. nautical double bank to row two men on a thwart of a boat; to double-bank a watch is to put two men on it ...
  • double clutch
    v. phr. 1. [cf. clutch mechanism for shifting gears in driving a car; DAS "double­clutcher a (truck) driver skilled enough to shift gears by double-clutching: = MOTHER ...
  • double family
    [cf. FAMILY relative and Scots double-sib related both by father and mother CSD] n. kinsmen tracing their genealogical con­nection through two routes: 1966 (Otterbem 127). (Black) ...
  • double luck
    n. term of praise for a man who fathers a child every year: 1966 (Otterbein 57). (Eleu., Mayag.) ...
  • double tap, double wracking
    [cf. OEDS II double time double the time specified or previously used (jazz)] n. a (drum) rhythm with two beats in the time of one; a ...
  • dough-boys
    /dówbohyz/, dobies /dówbiz/, doughs /dowz/ [cf. Krio dombay (Mende domba,dombei ditto, Vai dumbai cassava balls), ...a dish of boiled mashed cassava or coco-yam KED all prob­ably ...
  • douse
    [Brit, slang idem (Hancock p.c.); W3, to extinguish (a candle)] v. to put out (an electric light). (Andros, White) ...
  • down
    [E Car., Gul. down away from the source point of the prevailing wind (Roy 1977:69); US to the south, but US dial. North down "in a northerly ...
  • downfall
    [OED, ruin] n. an unmarried girl's first pregnancy: 1929 My mudder. .got her downfall in her mudder's house. She had two chillen. . die cause my ...
  • down so
    [cf. Sra. djaso here on the spot WST] adv. phr. there (with a gesture): That man down so, he real mean and hoggish when we go past ...
  • draffy
    [cf. Gul draffy drafty (Writers' Program 1940:57); cf. draft and OED draughty abounding in currents of air] adj. 1. (of nights) humid, with dew: Last ...
  • draft
    /draf/ [Vir. idem (Seaman); OED draught current of air, esp, in a confined place; def. 1 seems to derive from sitting in a draft, but ...
  • drags
    [cf. DREG to drag; probably by hypercorrection (Hancock p.c.); cf. Bermuda draggy full of dregs ADD] n. dregs. = DRAINS, DRAMS, DRUGS (Eleu., Andros) ...
  • drain
    /dreyn/; drean, dreen /driyn/ [W Car., Gul. idem ADD; cf. Brit. dial. dreen to drip EDD; OED drain let fall in drops strained out obs. ...
  • drains
    (Eleu., San Sal.); drams (Inagua, Mayag.) n. dregs. = DRAGS, DRUGS ...
  • draw (1)
    [Atlantic; Brit. dial. South draw brew (tea) (Orton L42); GED, to extract by infusion] v. to make (tea, coffee, chocolate): She say she goin' draw ...
  • draw (2)
    [cf. v.t. to draw (lots) + passivization] v.i. (of ASUE) to become due; to be a participant's turn: My asue draw this week (Nassau). ...
  • draw down
    [cf. OED draw to withdraw to one side] v. phr. to move over on a bench to make room for someone else to sit down. ...
  • drawers
    /drohz/ [OED, a term of low origin, which has risen into general use; in US usually considered merely archaic or rustic] n. underpants (current term). ...
  • draw hand
    [W Car.] v. phr. to make a leading or beckoning gesture: He draw his hand to the bush. (Nassau, Mayag.) ...
  • Drawing Spirit
    [said to draw one closer to God] n. the Holy Ghost: When you see the Drawing Spirit on you; he put on—you can't get away ...
  • draws
    /drohz/ [cf. Brit. dial. North draw curling term: to make a careful throw or shot EDD; probably based on third person sing. form] v. to ...
  • drawy
    [from draw pull + -y forming adj.] adj. (of the sea) having an undercurrent. = SUCKY (Andros) ...
  • dread
    /dred/ adj. [cf. Jam. Rastafarian talk "dread: true Rasta man; one who believes in Rasta religion; bad" (Pollard 1980:18); the term also refers to the ...
  • dread locks
    [Car.; cf. Jam. Rastafarian talk "dread locks. . the strands of a Rasta's hair" (Pollard 1980:19); cf. BDNE II dreadlocks idem] n. a man's Rastafarian-style ...
  • dream book
    [Cam. idem CCD; US Black idem (Dillard 1977:93)] n. a book translating dreamt images into lucky lottery numbers. cf. RING TUT (Black) ...
  • dream off
    v. phr, to doze off; to be almost asleep. (Black> ...
  • drean, dreen
    See DRAIN. ...
  • dreg
    [Krio idem (Hancock p.c.); cf. DRAGS dregs] v. to drag: 1895 The spirits would dreg him away (Edwards 87). (San Sal., Mayag.) ...
  • dress (1)
    [OED, to prepare for use as food] v. to prepare (food): 1966 She dress a pot-a-full of fish (Crowley 106). (Inagua, San Sal., White) ...
  • dress (2)
    [OED, to cultivate (a field)] v. to protect (crops) with a magic charm: 1918 Fixin' or dressin' fields against thieves (Parsons 13). = FIX (Black) ...
  • dress down
    [Gul. idem (Writers' Program 1940:16); cf. interchangeability of particles in other Eng. v. phr., e.g. slow up/down, burn up/down] v. phr. to put on one's ...
  • dress down/up
    [Car.; DJE "transf. from military use (an order to a line of drilling men to move sidewise until each has space enough)"] v. phr. to ...
  • dressing
    [Krio idem KED] n. attire: Hitian dressing. (Nassau) ...
  • driffs
    [from drift] n. flotsam; useful articles washed up on the beach (Fernander 1980). (San Sal.) ...
  • drift lumber
    n. drift wood used for construction: 1977 (Albury 17). (Gen.) ...
  • drink
    v. 1. [MCC, SA idem; cf. Bemba ukunwa umuti to take (lit, drink) medicine (M. Mann p.c.)] to take (medicine, pills, etc.). (Exuma, Mayag.) 2. ...
  • drissle
    [cf. Krio drisul drizzle, light rain KED] v. to drizzle (rain): It wanna rain—it fair drisslin' (Eleu.) ...
  • drive
    [Car.; cf. Krio drab idem (Hancock p.c.)] v.t. to drive away: 1918 You gwine see one or cat. Don't drive um (Parsons 19). (Black) ...
  • driver
    [from slave driver] n. 1. Obs. [Car.] a slave driver: 1800. A Negro man who has for many years been a driver on a Cotton ...
  • drogue
    /drowg/ [cf. OED, (related to drag?) "a hooped canvas bag towed at the stern of a boat to prevent it from broaching to"] v. to ...
  • drop
    n. [from v. drop (a line, net)] an area good for fishing: 1918 He went from drop to drop, and he could not catch any ...
  • drop-cord
    [W3, an electric-light cord used to suspend a lamp, usu. from an overhead outlet] n. any extension cord: Mind you don't trip over that drop-cord ...
  • droplet
    [cf, dropper dumpling + droplet small drop] n. small dumpling. (San Sal.) ...
  • droppers
    [from dropping dough into broth] n. small, unleavened dumplings in a stew. = SLIDERS (Black) ...
  • drossel
    [cf. W3 throstle song thrush, German Drossel thrush] n. Obs. a bird (sp?): 1782 Their wild fowl and birds are. . .galdings, drossels, mocking-birds (Bruce ...
  • drownded
    [W Car.; cf. Brit. dial. North, Mid drownd EDD, US dial. idem ADD, + -ed past participle] v. to drown: 1929 Does be plenty gets ...
  • drudge
    [W Car.; cf. Brit. dial. West, Irel. idem EDD, also US dial. ADD] n. a dredge. (Gen.) —v. to dredge. (Gen.)   ...
  • drug man
    n. a man, especially a young man, taking drugs or selling them on the street. (Black) ...
  • drugs
    [W Car.; Brit. dial. West EDD, US ADD] n. dregs. = DRAGS, DRAINS, DRAMS (Gen) ...
  • drummer
    [derivation from drum unclear, but cf. Krio droma (archaic) a drum, as a musical instrument KED] n. a storage drum, such as for corn, etc.: ...
  • drummer roach
    [cf. DJE drummer idem; OED drummer the large West Indian cockroach (Blat-ta gigantea) which makes a noise at night by knocking its head against the ...
  • drunk, drunken
    [cf. DJE drunk v. idem; OED drunken v.i., to drink to excess obs.→ 1697] v.t. (of intoxicants) to make drunk: The seven-year-apple, eat too much ...
  • drunker
    [cf. Krio dronko-man, Sra. drongo-man idem (Hancock p.c.); OED idem obs.→1608] n. drunkard. (San Sal., Mayag.) ...
  • drunky
    [Belize idem (Dayley)] adj. like a drunk. (Nassau, Abaco) ...
  • dry; dry up
    [cf. OED dry barren, sterile, unfruitful obs. → 1680, probably influenced semantically by an African partial equivalent, e,g. Lamso yumeer dry, thin (Todd 1969:186)] v. ...
  • dry balls
    [cf. OEDS II balls the testicles vulg.] n. 1. an aching of the testicles caused by sexual frustration. (Eleu.) 2. an itching or chafing of the scrotum, ...
  • dry down
    [cf. cook down] phr. [of liquid in cook­ing] to evaporate; to become dry: 1980 The fire is turned low after the water dries down (Watson ...
  • dry-eye
    [Atlantic; cf. OED dry-eyed tearless; cf. Haitian je chèch brazen (e.g. a liar) (Gaujean p.c.)] phr. withholding any emotional response; brazen or shameless: 1966 If ...
  • dry gas
      [cf. OED gas vapour generated in the stomach or intestines] n. flatulence. (Eleu., Mayag.)     ...
  • dry row
    [cf. dry-eye] n. an argument in which there is no display of emotion: 19401 witness d' dryest row in history (Dupuch 5). (San Sal.) ...
  • duck
    v. 1. [DAE, to get out of sight; to get away from; DAUL duck to dodge or to avoid] to avoid (a person or thing): ...
  • duck crab
      [etym?] n. a small beach crab (sp?). (Long)     ...
  • duck-dodger
      n, a small yellow and gray bird (sp?). (Andros)     ...
  • dude
      [DJE, very smart clothes; US duded up fop­pishly dressed ADD; OED dude a man affecting an exaggerated fastidiousness in dress, speech and deportment] adj. ...
  • dud; dude blood
    [US Black dude a regular man or boy (Claerbaut); US slang "any male...extended from the original sense of a city slicker" BDNE III n. a ...
  • duff
    [W Car.; DJE, one of the nautical words that came ashore in Jamaica; OED, a flour pudding boiled in a bag (originally a northern pronunciation ...
  • dug, dog
      /do(h)g/ [DHS dugs a woman's breasts or nipples.. .vulg.; from appearance: cf. CONCH BURRY idem] n. the small black protrusions on the soft body ...
  • dulfer&#39;s ham
      [ etym. uncertain, but cf. DHS duffer a person of no ability, a poor man having to savor his food with herbs instead of ...
  • dumb
      [OED, lacking some property.. normally belonging to things of the name; cf. DUMB BREAD] adj. (of baked goods): unrisen: 1940 Shud I trow one ...
  • dumb-batty
    [cf. W3 dumb betty a primitive mechanical household contrivance (as a washing machine), influenced by bat] n. a heavy weighted pole used to tamp down ...
  • dumb bread
    [Car.; Vir., a heavy Johnny cake (Seaman), Prov. an unsweetened comcake (Washa-baugh 1974:160); cf. DUMB] n. 1. a heavy, sweet unleavened cake with raisins. (Gen.) ...
  • dump
    [DAE, to throw or let (a person) fall unceremoniously; colloq.] v. to trip a person in wrestling so that he falls down. (Black) ...
  • duncy
    (Black); dunce (Inagua, Mayag.) [Car.; cf. US dial. duncy stupid ADD] adj. stupid: He very dunce (Mayag.). a duncy boy (Exuma). ...
  • dunny
    [cf. dinny idem] n. female genitals. (Mayag.) ...
  • dup, duppy
    n. [Car.; cf. Bube dupe ghost DJE] a ghost: 1918 B'o' Devil come dere dat day, call(ed) one-foot dup (Parsons 142). When we pass the ...
  • duppy needle
    [DJE ideal] n. a plant, Bidens pilosa, used medicinally. = SEARCHING NEEDLE, SHEPHERD NEEDLE (Andros, Exuma) ...
  • durgon
    [cf. Brit. dial. North, West durgin a stupid fellow EDD; US dial. durgen a rustic ADD] n. 1. a person from a particular area: a ...
  • during the while
    [W Car.] conj. while. (Mayag., White) ...
  • dust
    [cf. US dial. South dust-dark idem ADD; from dusk, with simplification of final consonant cluster to dus', "corrected" to dust] n. dusk: at dust (White). ...
  • dusty, dustee
    [probably from dusky, influenced by mustee] n., Obs a person of mixed white and black ancestry: 1801 Mr. Rose baptized 14 Whites and 24 "Blacks, ...
  • dut
    [cf. Scots dirt term of contempt for useless persons and things; dut a stupid fellow CSD] n. a term of contempt for persons. (Exuma, Mayag) ...
  • dutty
    [cf. Brit. dial. North dirty contemptible, mean EDD; cf. DUT] adj. base, immoral: Dem sex film ZNS shown' dutty (Nassau). ...
  • dutty dog, dutty pup
    [cf. DJE dog muma, dutty mama children's games] n. a game played by children in which they mix mud in a bowl and pretend to ...
  • dwelving house
    (White); dwelving home (Eleu.) [cf. OED dwelling-house dwelling + hypercorrection by analogy with TWELL twelve] n. 1. a dwelling; a house. (White) 2. [cf. "Let ...
  • dye straw
    [cf dry straw idem (Eleu.)] n. dyed or undyed strips of dried coconut frond for plaiting. (Black) ...
  • dying for hungry
    [cf. Cam, day hungri to starve CCD and colloq. Eng. dying of hunger; cf. HUNGRY hunger] v. phr. very hungry: I ain' eat nuttin' fa ...