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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • ear-ache
    [from use in folk medicine] n. a small white crab (sp?): You catch it, broke the fins, and drip the water in your ears to ...
  • early nut
    See OILY NUT. ...
  • ears, hears, years
    [Atlantic; these forms have different sources: year ear was used in standard English until the 16th century (OED) and is still current in US dial. ...
  • earth
    /oyt/ [etym?] n. a marijuana cigarette. (Nassau) ...
  • eas'
    /iys/ [cf. Brit. dial. North, Mid east yeast EDD, US dial. idem ADD] n. yeast: Johnny cake don't make with the eas' (Ragged). (Black) ...
  • eas' cake
    [ US Black idem (Walker 1956:128); cf. LAS'] n. a small piece of unbaked dough left from one baking to provide a starter of yeast ...
  • ease up
    [cf. OED ease to move gently] v. phr. to sneak up (on a person): 1966 And he walk, walk, and he ease up on Zachias ...
  • east'ard
    /i'ystad/ [nautical; cf. Brit. dial, North, West easter eastern EDD, US dial. North east'ard ADD] n., adj., adv, eastern; eastward: 1918 See him to the ...
  • easy-to-get-ven
    (Gen.); easy-to-get-mad (Inagua) [cf. W Car, easy-vex idem] adj. irascible: When mama come from work she's be too easy-to-get-vex (Nassau). ...
  • eat
    [Car.; OED, "intr. with pass. force (chiefly with adj. or adv.): to have a certain consistency or flavour when eaten" → 1766 (obs?); US dial. ...
  • eating sore
    [cf. OED eat of slow and gradual ac-tion, as of cancerous or similar disease; 1702 "That eating canker, Grief"] n. 1. an ulcer. (Gen). 2. cance. ...
  • eat off someone
     [from eat + live off] v. phr. to eat at someone else's expense: She never have lunch no more—she just eat off people (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • eat someone out
    [cf. Trin. eat out a plate of food (Winer p.c.) and US Black "Beer Rabbit.. .et out the cheese" (Fauset 1927:237); cf. OED eat out ...
  • Ebenezer jack
    [etym?] n. a black variety of jack-fish, Caranx sp., which lives in the deep ocean. (Andros, Mayag) ...
  • Ebo
    /íybow/ [OED Eboe a name applied in the West Indies to the negroes from Benin; cf. the lbo or Igbo people of southern Nigeria; the ...
  • Eboe light-wood
    [DJE idem "at one time used for torches"; cf. US dial. South lightwood very resinous pine or other wood ADD] n. a tree, Erythroxylon brevipes: ...
  • ebony
     [OED, DJE different sp.] n. a small tree, Hypelate trifoliata: 1905 (Shattuck 208). = RED WOOD (Black) ...
  • eddy
    /édi/ [Car. édo; OED eddoes. . .eddy-root; DJE "cf. Fante edwó(w) yam, ndwo(w) root" also Nupe èdu wild yam sp. DNL, Igbo ede (Xanthosoma sagittifolium)1ED; ...
  • edge-hog
    /ej hohg/ (Gen.); H-hog /eych hohg/ (San Sal.) [cf. DJE hedgehog fish /eyjag, eychag/] n. the porcupine fish, Diodon hystrix: 1731 Fish frequenting the Bahama ...
  • edge of the ocean
    [cf. OCEAN deep sea] n. the drop-off dividing shallow water from the deep ocean. cf. SOUNDING (Andros, White) ...
  • edging
    n. a style of plaiting STRAW1 (Wyannie Malone Museum display). (Black) ...
  • ee bee en
    See BE BOW BEN. ...
  • Egba
    [W3 a Yoruba-speaking people of south-western Nigeria] n. Obs. an African ethnic group: 1891 [Bahamians] still retain their African tribal distinctions; they are divided into ...
  • egg apple
    [OED, the fruit of the egg-plant, Solanum melongena] n. an unidentified fruit: 1827 The egg apple. . .highly esteemed by the islanders (Culmer 32). cf. ...
  • egg bird
    [OED, a tern, Hydrochelidon fuliginosum] n. 1. the tropic bird: 1880 Phaethon flavirostris . . .local name: Egg Bird (Cory 204). 2. a tern: 1910 ...
  • egg fruit
    n. 1. [DJE idem] the purple eggplant or aubergine, Solanum melongena.= GARDEN EGG 1 (Exuma) 2. [MCC idem] a small, yellow egg-shaped fruit (Lucuma sp.): ...
  • eggs
    n. 1. [cf. Sra. eksi, Jam. hegz, both 'egg' (Hancock 1969:50)] sing. or pl. egg or eggs: I give the eggs—fowl eggs. And you lick ...
  • egg-trash
    [W Car.; cf. TRASH] n. egg shells. (Black) ...
  • eh
    See HEY ...
  • either
    [ OED, in negative or interrogative sentences: any more than the other] conj. nor: He was not used to leaving his family, either the city ...
  • Eleuthera
    Eleuthera, a major island of the Bahamas. See ELEUTHERIA ...
  • Eleuthera bark
     [W3 idem; not in DAE, OED; from the name of the island] n. cascarilla, the aromatic bark of a shrub, Croton eluteria or C. cascarilla, ...
  • Eleutheria
      [cf. OED Eleutherian from Greek ελεύθερι-ος free + -an, the title of Zeus as protector of political freedom...1623] n. Obs. 1. a former name for ...
  • eleven o'clock
    [cf. OED eleven o'clock lady different sp.] n. a shrub, Strobilanthes sp., with purple-blue flowers: 1956 (Higgs 3). The flowers close in the midday sun, ...
  • eleven-string
    n. a width of STRAW1 plait woven with eleven strips: This one call eleven string cause that's how we make it (Andros). ...
  • else
    [W Car.; cf. OED else besides, now only poet. or arch.] adv. besides (after nouns as well as indefinite pronouns): Any other thing else? (Nassau). ...
  • else-way
    [cf. MCC assways backwards; OED else-wise in some other manner] adv. backwards. (San Sal., Mayag.) ...
  • Empire flowers
    [from their blooming around Empire Day, May 23rd] n. the blossoms of the poinciana tree, Poinciana regia. = MAY-FLOWER TREE, SHAKER TREE, TOURIST TREE (Eleu.) ...
  • en
    See AIN'T (2). ...
  • endeavor; endeavor best
    [Trin. idem (Winer); cf. US dial, do one's endeavor best to exert oneself to the utmost (old-fash.) DARE; from the phr. I'll endeavor to do ...
  • ending-night
    [MCC idem] n. the predawn hours, three to five a.m. (San Sal., Mayag.) ...
  • English thrasher
    n. the northern mocking bird, Mimus polyglottos: 1960 (Bond 166). = BROWN THRASHER (San Sal.) ...
  • enjoy
    [cf. OED, to give pleasure to obs. → 1610; US dial., to entertain; make happy ADD] v.t. to give pleasure (to someone): 1966 [A song] ...
  • enough
    See NUFF ...
  • envelop
    /envelap/ n. envelope. (Exuma, San Sal.) ...
  • Errol Fitzgerald
    [cf. Fitzgerald, an extended family living in The Ferry, Little Exuma; cf. also US Black unnamed ghost "with a long chain, spittin' fire" (Smiley 1919:368)] ...
  • erry
    [also US Black (Hancock p.c.); cf. OED every 1440 "eryday"] adj. every (also in compounds): 1971 Err'y night he just wan' touch me up (McCartney ...
  • Essequibo lily
    [after the Essequibo River, Guyana] n. a plant, Crinum sp.: 1889 (Gardner 356). cf. SPIDER LILY (Inagua) ...
  • etch!
    [probably from ITCH! from BITCH!] intj. an exclamation of surprise, pain, or strong emotion; also an incitement to fight: Etch, I get ya! (Nas-sau, San ...
  • eucharist lily
    [cf. OED eucharis (Greek 'pleasing') ... a South American bulbous plant bearing white bell-shaped flowers. . ."eucharis lilies"] n. a plant, Eucharis amazonica: 1889 (Gardner ...
  • even
    adv. (not) even (regularly occurring before negator or helping verb): 1974 She even een seventeen yet! (King 8). (Black) ...
  • evening
    [Car.; also dial. in Brit. Mid, East EDD, US ADD; cf. also Port. tarde idem] n. the period from noon until dark: 1966 Well one ...
  • evaporated cream
    /(iy)vápareytad/ [from evaporated milk + CREAM condensed milk] n. unsweetened, condensed milk: 1978 (Higgs 35). You want I should give that vaporated cream to the ...
  • even
    [OED, obs. exc. poet, and dial, → 1843; US dial. idern ADD] n. evening: 1918 Dat even' when (dey). .come (Parsons 142). (Black) ...
  • eventime
    [cf. even; OED idem but archaic in US] n. evening: 1918 Here came a gentleman at even'- time. . ."Good evenin', Deah!" (Parsons 45). (Black) ...
  • ever
    adv. 1. [Gul., US dial. South idem ADD; OED ever always: now arch. or merely literary ] always: He was ever in charge of a ...
  • exactly
    (MCC idem; cf. OED, completely obs. → 1726] adv. much (too + adj.): It is exactly too high. (Gen.) ...
  • except
    [Gul. idem (Gonzales 1922:292); US dial. "archaic" ADD] conj. unless: It's difficult to get there except he has transportation (Nassau). You can't go 'shore except ...
  • expecially
    [cf. US dial. ex cape escape] adv. especially: He expecially. . .was real bad (Andros). (Black) ...
  • expensive
    [cf. US colloq. $64 word idem] adj. (of words) rare, erudite. (Black) ...
  • extray
    [W Car.; from x-ray, influenced by extra; cf. also US dial. extry extra ADD] n. x-ray. (Black) ...
  • Exuma
      [from Lucayan; see quot.] n. a major Bahamian island group: 1500 Yumey (Juan de la Cosa map, quoted by Ilunte 1975:127). 1523 Suma (Turin map, ...
  • eye catch fire for something
    [Car.; cf. it caught my eye and CATCH 10 to set on fire] phr. to get a sudden craving for something seen for the first ...
  • eye-docity
    /aydóhsiti/ (cf. Belize aidasiti audacity (Dayley)] n. audacity. (Exuma) ...
  • eye-man
    [cf. OED eye-doctor idem] n. optometrist: 1977 Plenty of them who the eye-man test they eye he ain't do much good for them (Shilling 163). ...
  • eye-opener
    [OED, US: a draught of strong liquor, esp. one taken in the morning] n. a stimulant drug; speed: 1971 (McCartney 27). ...
  • eyes
    [Car.; cf. DJE yai, yaiz eye, eyes (in the folk speech inflectional distinction between sg. and plur. is lost: each form is used in either ...
  • eye-skin
    [Pan-Creole; cf. Haitian po je (lit, skin eye) idem FICEED; cf. Krio yay-skin idem (Hancock p.c.); cf. lbo anya ahu (lit, eye-skin) idem (Okolo p.c.); ...
  • eye-water
    [Pan-Creole; OED idem →1845, but this may be a loan translation: cf. Igbo ana-mmiri, Mandinka ngaya (Turner 90, 234), Malinke nye-yi (Echteld 187), Twi ani-suo ...
  • eye-winker
    [Scots idem CSD; US dial. North, Mid DARE] n. eyelash: 1919 Eye-vinker never fall in your eye (Parsons 440). 1925 Eye-winkers older than beard (Finlay ...