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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • jack
    n. 1. [cf. Krio jak familiar address for any male friend KED; also US Black (Claerbaut); W3 pal, buddy ... usually used in address; cf. Brit. ...
  • Jack bird
    [cf. OED jack name for various birds; short for jack daw) n. the pearly-eyed thrasher, Margarops fuscatus: 1960 (Bond 169). = BLACK THRASHER, PAWPAW BIRD; ...
  • Jack Brush
    [cf. JACK (FISH)] n. a variety of squirrel-fish, Holocentrus sp. = POP-EYE JOHN, BIG-EYE JOHN (San Sal.) ...
  • jack bush
    [DJE idem Eupatorium odoratum; cf. OED jack-in-the-bush local name for hedge garlic] n. a plant (sp?) which grows on rocky shores: 1905 (Shattuck 223). = ...
  • jack dawl
    [cf. OED jack daw small crow sp.; perhaps influenced by doll] n. a black bird, probably the smooth-billed ani, Crotophaga ani, cf. CROW (Andros, Exuma) ...
  • jack fish
    [Car.; cf. Sra. djakki idem DJE] n. Usually shortened to jack. a common food fish, Caranx hippos: 1782 grupers, jacks (Bruce 46). 1905 Caranx crysos ...
  • jack-in-the-box
    [from its resemblance to the toy: the larva constructs a casing of twigs about two inches long within which it lives, but it protrudes its ...
  • jacknife fish
    [from appearance] n. a fish, Equetus lanceolatus: 1968 Jacknife fish ... the high dorsal fin and elongated tail resemble an open jackknife (Böhlke 401). (Inagua, ...
  • jackmada
    /jakmadá/ [cf. DJE jack-in-the-bush /jákana bush/ E. odoratum] n. a shrub, Eupatorium viollosum, used medicinally: 1920 (Britton 438). 1978 Jackmada ... considered a sure cure ...
  • Jacko
    [W Car. a credulous person; cf. also JACK 2] n. 1. a somewhat contemptuous term of address: Jacko --da's what you call a guy who ...
  • jack-o'-lantern
    (Black); jack-ma-lantern (Andros) [cf. Montserrat jak lánchan (I. Wells), Trin. jackalantan (Ottley 45), US Black Jack o ma lantern (Smiley 1919: 363), all similar; cf. ...
  • Jack Spaniard
    n. 1. [cf. DJE, type of fowl or chicken with few feathers; those which it has are reddish, whence the name) the Greater Antillean bullfinch, Loxigilla violacea: ...
  • jackstone
    [OED idem, jackstone a small six- pointed usu. metal object used in the game of jacks; cf. W3 jack, a small round stone: pebble; esp: one used ...
  • jack up
    v. phr. 1. [cf. Brit. slang idem DES, Scots jeck to neglect a piece of work CSDI to ruin (a piece of work): [student asking about ...
  • Jacob's ladder
    [in reference to Genesis 28:12] n. a style of plaiting broad strips of light and dark STRAW together, forming a serrated edge (Banister display). (Gen.) ...
  • Jah
    [DJE idem "probably from Jah Jehova (cf. OED). A deity in the cults of 'Maroons' 1953"; evidently taken on by Rastafarians: cf. "Jah-love Protect Us", ...
  • Jah-lion
    See lion. ...
  • jail
    [cf. OED goal gaol (jail) → 18th century] n. the ring into which marbles are thrown. cf. PUTTING IN JAIL (Black) ...
  • jalbry prickle
    /jálbri/ [etym?] n. a plant (sp?) with small leaves and prickles. (Andros) ...
  • jam (1)
    [US Black, to make exciting music, to have a good time socially (Major); OEDS 11, to play in a jam (session), to improvise (a tune); cf. also ...
  • jam (2)
    [cf. Krio dzham to be stalemated, from nauti­cal jam (Hancock 1969:25); cf. OED, to wedge so as to prevent movement; cf. also US slang jam predicament DAS] ...
  • Jamaica apple
    [W3 different sp.] n. a fruit, Annona squamosa: 1976 Jamaica apples, which I believe Jamaicans call "sweet sop" (Eneas 8). = SWEET SOP (Gen.) ...
  • Jamaica cherry
    [DJE, W3 different sp.; from the red, cherry-like fruit] n. a tropical shrub, Mal­pighia sp.: 1788 The Jamaica or "wild" cherries (Malpighia glabra, M. urens) . . ...
  • Jamaica grape
    [DJE idem] n. a plant, Vitis caribaea: 1889 (Gardner 373). (Inagua) ...
  • Jamaica man
    [Car.; cf. MAN] n. a man from Jamaica: 1940 One Jamaica man come t' Nassau (Dupuch 111). (Gen.) ...
  • Jamaica vine
    n. a vine (sp?) with heart-shaped leaves and small, white flowers, used for decoration. (Adelaide) ...
  • jamming music
    [cf. JAM 1] n. disco or reggae music. (Andros, Adelaide) ...
  • jam up
    [cf. Cam. jæm-am to collide (of vehicles) CCD; cf. JAM2] v. 1. (of vehicles) to collide. (Eleu.) 2. (of people) to fight. (Eleu.) -- n. [cf. v. ...
  • Janirary, Janiwary, Janivary, Janury
    [cf. Belize Jeniweri, Janiweri (Dayley), Gut. Jinnywerry (Gonzales 1922:306); cf. Brit. dial. Mid. Janniwerry EDD, Scots Janiveer CSD, US dial. Jenawery ADD] n. January: 1936 D' munt o' Janirary ...
  • jar (1)
    [cf. Krio ja-ja to nag (Hancock p.c.); OED jar to be at variance (of persons) obs. → 1764] v. to provoke some one. cf. JAY (Black) ...
  • jar (2)
    [cf. OED ajar half open (of a door)] v.t. to keep (a door) open by placing an object in the doorway: Jar the door with a rock (San ...
  • jaw-bone
    [W Car.; cf. Krio jabon jawbone, Yoruba ijagbon the flesh under one's chin KED; US Black cf. Smiley (1919:359)] n. a musical in­strument, now little used, ...
  • jaw-bone breaker
    [cf. Vir. jaw bone a native candy (Farr 108); cf. W3 jawbreaker a round, hard candy] n. an all-day sucker (a large lollipop): Them big jaw-bone breaker bad for ...
  • jay
    [cf. JAR1 idem] v.t. to deliberately annoy or provoke a person. (Eleu.) ...
  • jazz
    [cf. OEDS II jazz to behave wildly, jazz around fool around; "cf. Mandingo jasi to be­come abnormal or out of character. .. Wolof yees idem, Temne yas to ...
  • JC Mosquito
    [from James Cistern, locally abbreviated to J.C.] n. nickname for a native of James Cistern, Eleuthera. (Eleu.) ...
  • jebim
    [etym. uncertain, but cf. OED jeroboam large bowl or bottle] n. lemonade. (Nassau) ...
  • jelly
    [from appearance] n. the soft, jelly-like flesh of unripe coconuts: 1963 [He] came with some jelly coconuts.... I scooped out the jelly (Cottman 72). = ...
  • jelly okra
    [from the mucilaginous juice] n. 1. roselle, Hibiscus sabdariffa; the calyx of its flower is eaten as a fruit: 1946 (Morton 85). 2. young, juicy okra, ...
  • Jenerat
    [etym?] n. a folk-tale character: 1966 B'Jenerat: a "wicky" (wicked) and "witchy" (magically endowed) little boy who delights in tricking B' Devil, and in rescuing ...
  • jenny
    [OED, prefix to denote a female animal, as jenny ass ... short for same] n. 1. a mare. (Inagua, San Sal.) 2. a female goat. (Long) ...
  • Jerusalem bush
    [cf. W3 Jerusalem oak, C. botrys] n. a plant, Chenopodium ambrosioides: 1978 Jerusalem bush ... an insignificant weed used for worms (Higgs 16). = HEDGE ...
  • Jerusalem catnit
    [cf. CATNIT catnip] n. a plant, Nepeta coerulea, with blue flowers and aromatic leaves used in infusions for coughs. = BLUE CATNIP, BLUE CATNIT, CAT ...
  • jessamin
    [cf. Car. jessamy jasmine DJE; cf. OED jessamy jasmine obs. → 1733] n. a plant: Jesssamin is a tall plant like the pineapple with a ...
  • Jesus, Jesus Christ, or Christ
    [Car. DJE; cf. Gul. every God one (Turner 1949:267)] emphasizer: Every Jesus t'ing root up (Nassau). Not one Christ t'ing (Exuma). (Gen.) ...
  • jewelries
    n. pl. pieces of jewelry: I heard a juggling of jewelries (COB). (Black) ...
  • jezz
    See THROW WORDS. ...
  • jibdog
    [cf. Brit. dial jibby girl dresed in showy finery OED] n. a female dog: 1950 In common parlance a jibdog is the female of the ...
  • jig up
    [OED jig to do a lively, rapid, springy kind of dance] v. phr. to dance: 1978 Dey got what dey call a disco. Dese young peepul ...
  • jimbay
    See JUMBAY . ...
  • jinjy
    /jinji/ [cf. CHIN-CHIN idem] n. a bird, the banana quit (Coereba flaveola). = BAHAMA SPARROW, BANANA BIRD 1, CHEE CHEE, etc., YELLOW BREAST (San Sal.) ...
  • jinny
    [cf. Krio jinay genie, from Arabic via Mende (Hancock p.c.); cf. also OED jinnee genie, spirit] n. a ghost. (Black) ...
  • jitney
    [cf. US Black jitney taxi (Walker 1956: 200); cf. OEDS I "the Jewish slang term for a nickel [5 cents].... jitney bus derives its name from jitney ...
  • jittimy
    See JITNEY 3. ...
  • jive
    n. [cf. US Black "jive misleading talk; cf. Wolof jev, jew to talk about somebody in his absence, esp. in a disparaging way; cf. also English jibe" (Dalby 1972:182)] ...
  • job depression
    n. an economic depression; wide­spread unemployment. (Nassau, San Sal.) ...
  • jock
    See CHOCK. ...
  • Joe Bucks
    [cf. US Black Joe Sad anyone unpop­ular or undesirable (Sebastian 1934:288); cf. W3 Joe fellow + buck dollar (slang)] n. a rich man. (Inagua) ...
  • Joe Frigby
    [etym?] n. a plant (sp?) which is tall, has pale green leaves and is used as a laxative. (Andros, Adelaide) ...
  • Joe Sanky crab, Joe crab
    [cf. Krio jokenge a crab, from Mende jokenge idem KED] n. a small crab (Callinectes sp?). cf. BANNY-SINKLE, SANKY, SHAGGO (Black) ...
  • Joe Seegry
    /jow síygri/ [etym?] n. a plant (sp?) made into a medicinal infusion. (Andros) ...
  • Joe tree, Joe wood, Joe bush
    [cf. W3 joebush, joewood (Jacquinia keyensis) no date; not in DAE] n. a tree used in making soap: 1835 The soap tree, or what is generally known ...
  • John
    [cf. US Black "an average man, esp. one who can be easily exploited, or easily taken in; a male lover, a prostitute's client" (Dalby 1972: ...
  • John Brown
    [MCC idem; cf. DJE Old John the Devil; evidently from the US South, where the name of John Brown (abolitionist, 1800-59) was equated with that ...
  • John Canoe
    See JUNKANOO. ...
  • John Crow
    [Atlantic; cf. Sar. djankoó idem (Alleyne 57); "from carrion crow. . . /kyangkrog/ whence by affrication of /ky-/to/ty-/ and voicing to ... /jangkro/ DJE] n. ...
  • John DeMott
    See JOHNNY MOTT. ...
  • John Doctor
    [from medicinal use] n. a plant, Periscaria portoricensis: 1978 (Higgs 10). 1979 The John Doctor root is crushed and inhaled for relief in headaches and ...
  • John Fighting
     /john fáytin/ [etym?] n. a variety of poisonous cassava: The poison cassava like this, we call it John Fighting (Andros). ...
  • Johnny cake
    [W Car. idem; Vir, fried bread (Roy); "of uncertain origin, but probably Indian; earliest record of Johnny cake is 1739, of Journey-cake 1754 [DAE, both ...
  • Johnny Cutlass
    [perhaps from the shape of the poinciana pod] n. a musical rattle consisting of a dried poinciana pod or a section of a hollow bamboo ...
  • Johnny Hill cassava
    [cf. Johnny Mott cassava, possibly understood as Johnny Mountain, whence Johnny Hill; cf. also Blue Mountain cassava] n. a variety of cassava: Johnny Hill cassava ...
  • John Mott, John DeMott
    [cf. Scots Johnny Maut malt liquor CSD, and liquor made from cassava, e.g. MCC mishla] n. 1. a variety of black sweet cassava: That's what ...
  • Johnny walkers
    [ US dial. South idem ADD; cf. MCC John Canoe stilts, and the association of stilt-dancers with JUNKANOO (see 1849 quot.); walkers may come from ...
  • joke
    [cf. OED, a witticism] n. a tale; a folk-tale: This joke what I gon tell you, me neither you bin dis side [i.e. it happened ...
  • joke-box
    [from JOKE, perhaps influenced by juke-box] n. a raconteur; an entertaining person: 1966 A man who talk old-story called by some people a joke-box (Crowley ...
  • jokey, jokitty, jokitive
    [cf. Belize jóoki idem (Dayley); cf. Scots jokie CSD, US dial. jokey ADD] adj. fond of a joke: 1940 He's a jokitty feller (Dupuch 12). ...
  • jook, juck, juke
    /juk/ [Atlantic (cf. Krio, Cam. chuk idem); "cf. Fulani jukka pokè ... perhaps reinforced by Port. chocar push, thrust" DJE II; cf. also SA druk ...
  • Joseph's coat
    n. 1. [DJE idem; from its many colors] a plant, Euphorbia heterophylla: 1889 (Gardner 406). (Gen.) 2. the banana tree leaf when it becomes tattered. (San ...
  • joy
    [OED, exultation of spirit] n. spirit, enthusiasm: 1936 Canada ain got no Empire joy (Dupuch 88). 'Lection come t' eart' agen an' 'Brilan' gone wild ...
  • juck
    See JOOK. ...
  • jucking off
     [cf. Gul ju'k jerk (Gonzales 1922:308) and jerk off to masturbate DHS] n. masturba­tion: 1971 Masturbation . . ."jucking off" (McCartney 113). (Gen.)   ...
  • juggle
    v. 1. [cf. Scots juggle to shake, jiggle to make jingling noise CSD] to jingle: I heard a juggling of jewelries (COB). (Nassau) 2. [ OED, ...
  • juice
    [US slang idem DAS; the allusion is probably to semen: cf. DHS jerk one's juice to mastur­bate] n. sexual intercourse (youth slang): I had a ...
  • juju (1)
    /juwjuw/ [from jujube, probably influenced by JUJU2] n. the jujube tree, Zizyphus jujuba, and its sweet yellow fruit: 1976 Guavas, jujus, star apples (Eneas 8). 1978 ...
  • juju (2)
    [also Krio KED, Gul, (Turner 1949:195); the word, found throughout West Africa meaning 'charm, fetish, taboo', has been derived from Hausa dzhu:dzhu. (ibid, W3), but ...
  • jumbay, jumbie
    See JUMBY 2 ...
  • jumby
    /jombi/ n. 1. [Pan-Creole; cf. Haitian zõbi (whence zombie), Dutch zumbi; from kiKongo nzumbi Mbundu nzumbe, Vai nzúma, all ´ghost' (Hancock 1971: 429); cf. also ...
  • jumper
    [OED, an animal, esp. an insect ... char­acterized by jumping] n. a very small insect (sp?) which feeds on seaweed washed onto the shore. (Andros, ...
  • jumper church
    [cf. US Black, "shouting and jumping in church" (Brown 1972:135); cf. OED jumper a name applied to members of a body of Methodists which arose ...
  • jumper service
    n. a church service at which lively hymns are sung. (Cat) ...
  • jump-in dance, jumpin' dance
    [cf. W Car. jumpin a dance; US Black jump idem (Claerbaut)) n. a RING DANCE performed by adults around participants in the center of a ...
  • jumping jack
    [OED, a child's toy, blending with JACK-FISH] n. a flying fish; a variety of jack (Caranx sp.) which jumps out of the water. = BEATING ...
  • jump up
     [Car.; cf. JUMP-IN DANCE] n. a party with dancing. (Black) —v. to dance. (Black) ...
  • jumpy
      [cf. JUMP-UP] adj. in a mood to dance: Jumpy night [an old term for Saturday night] (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • June fish
    [Car.; cf. OED Jew fish "It hath scales and Fins, therefore a clean fish according to the Levitical Law"; by nasalization and folk etym.] n. ...
  • junjo
    /júnjow/ [cf. Pan-Creole djõdjõ mushroom, mold in Krio (KED), Jam., Haitian, LA Fr. Cr. (Thompson 1958); cf. also Car. Sp. yonyón (Alvarez Nazario 1974:250); cf. Igbo ...
  • junk
     [Atlantic; OED idem "originally nautical"; also Brit. dial. North, West EDD] n. a chunk, especially of meat: 1928 A junk of meat (Parsons 472). It ...
  • Junkanoo, John Canoe
    /jóngkanu/ [W Car.; cf. Krio Jokunu a fool KED (= DJE John Canoe 4.); "by folk-etym. from some such form as Ewe dzono sorcerer + ...
  • Junkanoo face
    [DJE jangko fies id em; cf. JUNKANOO + FACE mask] n. a mask worn at the Junkanoo celebration. cf. SIFTER FACE (Black) ...
  • junks
    n. 1. [Krio idem (Hancock p.c.); cf. W3 junk trash] pieces of trash: A junks place (San Sal.). (Black) 2. [cf. JUNK] kindling wood. (Black) ...
  • just
    [cf. just as] conj. as soon as: Just they walk in the door, they start a-trying to rap with the girls (Nassau). ...
  • just like how.
    See LIKE HOW. ...
  • just now
    [Atlantic, SA idem; Brit. dial. idem EDT)] adv. soon; right away: You could fix that just now for me, please? (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • jute-box
    [US dial. South idem W3] n. jukebox. (Black) ...