K

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • kag
    /kag, kyag/ [cf. OED, 1678 "Kag or keg"; also Scots CSD, US South ADD] n. keg: 1918 Kag of butter (Parsons 1). cf. KEG DRUM ...
  • kaprang
    (Nassau); kaprank (Mayag. Inagua); kapring (Eleu); kaprink (San Sal.; [probably imitative of the rattling or banging noise made by such a vehicle] n. an old, ...
  • katakoo
    See CATACOO. ...
  • Kataya
    /kataya/ [thought to be an African tribal name] n. a group of people (like YORUBAS, CONGOS, etc.). (Nassau) ...
  • kaya
    /káya/ [evidently a Jam, word associated with Rastafarians; cf. Bob Marley album Kaya with cover picturing a marijuana plant; cf. DJE kaya weed with 3-part ...
  • keck
    /kek/ [etym. uncertain, but possibly akin to CAKE vagina: cf.make /mek/, take /tek/; cf. also Yoruba kékèké DYL, Common Bantu *-kééké (Carter p.c.), both 'small'] ...
  • keep
    [Atlantic; "locally current in US" DJE] v. to hold (a ceremony); to carry out (an activity) in the prescribed manner: 1918 They were keeping the ...
  • keep a-(do)
    [cf. A1 marking progressive verb] v. phr. to keept doing (or any present participle): You gatty keep a-knock (Andros). 1. a (1) ...
  • keeper
    [OED, one who has charge or care of anything] n. the fisherman who stays in the boat to tend it while other other dives. = ...
  • keep my (his, our, etc.) company
    [Atlantic; probably from earlier Cr. poss. adj. of same form as object pronouns] v. phr. keep (a person) company: Please keep my company 'cause out ...
  • keep somebody hot
    [from hot pursuit?] v. phr. to be at a person's heels, following him around and getting in the way. (Black) ...
  • keg drum
    /kyag drom/ [cf. KAG; from construction] n. a drum made from a wooden barrel covered with goat-skin: 1978 (Bethel 40). (Nassau, Exuma) ...
  • kerpunkle
    See CAPOONKLE. ...
  • khaki
    [from its color] n. a fish, the seargeant major (Abudefduf marginatus, A. saxatilis). (Eleu.) ...
  • khus-khus
    See CUSH-CUSH ...
  • kick
    [by analogy, from the pain inflicted] v. (of insects) to bite: 1954 Where the hell these sand fly mosquitos come from, kicking [biting] like this? ...
  • kick off
    [cf. OED kick out to die slang] v. phr. to collapse; to faint; She kick off-they haddy call de am'lance  (Rum Cay). ...
  • kill-em-peter
    [cf. PICK-PETER idem] n. the gray king-bird, Tyrannus dominicensis.= CHICKEREELY, FIGHTER, PICKCHEELY (Inagua, San Sal., White). ...
  • kill-em-polly
    [etym. uncertain, but cf. KILLING PETER] n. the least tern, Sterna albifrons, a small white sea bird: ...
  • killer-ka dick, killy-da-dick
    [evidently from its cry; cf. querequeté idem (Bond 1960: 127)] n. the mosquito hawk, Chordeiles minor: 1960 (Bond 127). 1977 The killer-ke-dicks arrive in the ...
  • killing peter
    [cf. Scots killileepie the common sandpiper CSD] n. a small sea bird: (sp?): 1909 A species of small tern or sea-swallow, locally known as the ...
  • kill the sin
    [cf. SIN fault] v. phr. to say that something was no one's fault. (Andros, Eleu.) ...
  • kill out
    [W Car.; US dial. South idem (Green)] v. phr. to kill off: 1917 Kill out de worrum what eats de teet away (Defries 83). 1918 ...
  • killy-hawk, killy-killy
    [cf. Gul. keléle a marsh bird (Turner 1949:196)] n. the sparrow hawk, Falco sparverius: 1972 (Paterson 52). ...
  • kill yourself out
    [Car.; cf. KILL OUT and Scots kill to exhaust CSD] v. phr. to work hard until exhausted: I see poor Miss Jane there killing herself ...
  • kimbo, kimba, kimber
    /kimba/ [cf. Car. kimbo hip "aphetic form of akimbo" DJE, but cf. OED on kenbow akimbo 1600's, and Scots kembo idem CSD] n. hip: 1929 ...
  • kinep
    See GUINEP. ...
  • kindoiah
    [cf. Kongo nkhiindu noise, riot (Carter p.c.)] n., Obs. a word of unknown meaning, chanted at a FIRE DANCE: 1891 The company clap their hands ...
  • king conch
    n. a variety of conch (Strombus sp.): 1885 The queen conch . . . has gone quite out of favour, and the king conch—which, though ...
  • King Curls
     n. a good shooting marble which spins. = STICKY TAW (Black) ...
  • King George
    [probably after various kings of England (1714-1830; 1910-52)] n. the name of a king in Bahamian folktales. (Cat) ...
  • king lizard
    [cf, DJE Kingston lizard (Ameiva dorsalis)] n. a greenish lizard (sp?) often reaching 12 inches in length. cf. GIANT LIZARD (Gen.) ...
  • King Tut
    [from the title of one such book] n. book to translate dreams into winning lottery numbers. = DREAM BOOK (Black) ...
  • king wasp
    /king wahs/ [in reference to its size] n. a two-inch long wasp (sp?) with a bad sting. = GIANT WASP (Nassau) ...
  • kinny-kinny
    [evidently from a now obs, form kin skin (DJE idem)+ —y diminutive or archaic creole suffix (cf. '-EE); cf. current Skinny, skinny, you know me—I ...
  • Kinship
    Traditionally the Bahamian family has tended to be large and close-knit, comprising a complex network of mutual obligations and resources, both social and economic. Relatives ...
  • kissing catchers
    See CATCHERS' KISSES. ...
  • kiss my hip (neck, leg, left leg, etc.)
    (neck, leg, left leg, etc.) [cf. DHS kiss mine arse, kiss my foot rubbish!; cf. also HIP buttocks] intj. an exclamation of surprise. (Gen.) 1160. ...
  • kit
    (Black); kid (Exuma) [OED kit a circular wooden vessel, made of hooped staves, with or without lid and handles ..."haddock, sent away in kits"] n. ...
  • kite
    [cf. Scots kite belly CSD, OED kyte idem, from etymon meaning 'fleshy part of the body, esp. the thigh'] n., Obs? hip (possibly buttocks; cf. ...
  • kittle
    [Atlantic; cf. OED kittle kettle 1700's, also US dial. ADD] n, 1.a kettle: 1918 kittle wi' hot water (Parsons 68). (Gen) 2. a pail or ...
  • kitty-gut(s)
     [cf. CATGUTS idem ] n. a forward somersault: Jump or turn kitty-guts (Eleu.). ...
  • kiver
    /kiva/ [Car.; OED, cover obs. and dial.; also US dial. ADD] n., v. cover: I got him kiver [with a gun) (San Sal.). (San Sal., ...
  • knock
    v. 1. [Atlantic] to strike (a person): 1918 He kill de nex' wife, knock him up (Parsons 52). (Black) 2. [Atlantic] to beat (a drum): ...
  • knock
    See KNUCK ...
  • knocks down
    (Mayag., Inagua); knacks down (Crooked) [cf. OED knock-down irresistible, and Scots knack to knock CSD] adj. dressed up. ...
  • knock-taw-take
    [cf. TAW marble] n. a variation in the game of marbles in which those marbles won are kept. (Black) ...
  • knotty
    [Car., US Black idem ESEA] adj. (of hair) tightly curled. cf. KNOTTY-HEAD (Black) ...
  • knotty dread
    [cf. Jam, natty a Rastafarian; unkempt hair; dreadlocks (Pollard 1980:19); cf. DREAD] n. a young person who favors the Rastafarian life style, fashions, etc. cf. ...
  • knotty-head
    [Car.; cf. KNOTTY] n. a person with short, tightly curled hair that is difficult to comb. (Black) ...
  • know to
    [W Car.; cf. Sp. saber hacer (lit, know to do) know how to do] v. phr. to know how to (do something): That little boy ...
  • knuck, knock
    [cf. US dial. South knucks knuckles WEA; cf. OED knockle knuckle obs.→1800's] n. 1. knuckle: 1918 His two knuck bone (Parsons 104). 1966 Only a ...
  • knucks hole
    (cf. Vir. nogle idem (Emanuel 1972: 84); cf. Brit. dial. North knuckley-hole a game played with marbles ... the loser in the game places a marble between ...
  • koka
    See COCO. ...
  • kokay
    See COKAY. ...
  • kyag
    See KAG. 1389. kag ...
  • kotty
    [cf. GOTTY got to; devoicing of /g/ to /k/ is supposed to be characteristic of speech on Harbour Island, a cay off Eleuthera] auxiliary v. ...
  • kyap
    [from captain] n. term of address for the captain of a boat. (Nassau) ...
  • kyacoon
    /kyakúwn/ [from racoon by folk etym. via rat-coon and cat-coon; cf. Krio muskyat muskrat KED] n. raccoon. (Nassau) kyag. See RAG. ...
  • kunka
    /kúngka/ [cf. koko idem in W Car., Haitian (Taylor 1977:166), kunkú idem in Krio, Trin. (Hancock 1969:71] n. vagina. (Nassau) ...