L

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • lace edge
    [from appearance] n. a style of plaiting narrow strips of STRAW together tightly, forming large double hoops on the edge (Bannister display). (Gen.) ...
  • lady fingers
    [DJE idem; OED different sp.] n. a long, slender variety of chili pepper (Capsicum sp.). (Adelaide) ...
  • lala
    /lála/ [etym. uncertain, but cf. LOLLY idem] n. vagina (child's word). (Black) ...
  • lamb conch
    n. a variety of conch (Strombus sp.): 1928 (Curry 107). (Gen) ...
  • lamp-lighter
    (Gen.); lamp-a-lighter (Black) [cf. DJE lamp-outer idem] n. the firefly. ...
  • lan
    [from lance, construed as plural] n. lance: 1895 De man take 'e lan' [lance] (Edwards 73). ...
  • land
    /lan/ [etym?] n. a large foot: You wearin' lan' [i.e. your feet are big] (Eleu.). Boy, go put shoes on them land you got there ...
  • lander
    [etym?] n. a bump on the head. (Rum Cay, San Sal) ...
  • land guffer
     See GUFFER. ...
  • land-paper
    [cf. DJE birth-paper birth certificate] n. a deed; a title (to land): We don't have to take land papers; Father Allen don't sell fish too ...
  • land somebody off
     [ cf. OED land to set on shore, to set down from a vehicle; cf. Brit. dial. North, Scots land to reach home EDDI v. ...
  • lap
    [US Black idem (Faucet 1927:261); cf. US dial, lap from obs, lop, the loppings of a tree ... a treetop left on the ground after ...
  • lapli
    /laplíy/ [Haitian from Fr. la pluie the rain] n. rain (used with Haitians). (Eleu.) ...
  • lart
    /laht/, lartin, /láhtin/ [cf. OED lath idem] n. stick or sticks used as a foundation for THATCH in making a roof; De house was t'atch. . ...
  • larzhan
    /lahzhán/ [Haitian from Fr. l'argent the money] n. money (used with Haitians). (Exuma) ...
  • last
    /las/ [cf. DJE las' y last or youngest child;Krio las sista youngest sister KED] adj. youngest (in a family): my las' sister (Nassau). (Gen.) ...
  • last: I give you last
    [cf. Car. last lick, DJE Krio gi las KED, both idem; cf. Brit. dial. North last bat poison, West last touch, idem EDD, also cf. ...
  • last-last
    /lás las/ [Atlantic; by reduplication of last; cf. Mandinka lábang-labango the very end (Rowlands 1969b:158)] adj. the very last. (Black) ...
  • last name
     ["A person's surname is referred to as his . . . first name because he was born with it" (Otterbein 1966:117)] n. Christian or given ...
  • last of all
    [OED, (at) the very last] adv. phr. finally: 1925 Each one want the other to begin. Last of all they get to fuss (Finlay 293). ...
  • lated
    [Car.; Gul. idem (Writers' Program 1940:31); OED, belated poetical; Brit. dial. North idem EDD] adj. 1. late; behind time: 1936 Well, dey havin' wun champain ...
  • latrin
    /látrin/ [cf. OED latron obs. Scots variant of latrine] n. a privy, (Exuma) ...
  • latrope
    [from heliotrope?] n. the small-leaf wild fig, Ficus perforata. (Adelaide) ...
  • lau
    /law/ [etym. uncertain, but cf. Sp. bacalao /bakáláw/ codfish, or various locally important food fishes W3] n. a long fish (sp?) resembling the barracuda. (Andros, San Sal.) ...
  • laugh: Oh Lord, I can't laugh
    phr. I could die laughing. (Exuma) ...
  • laughing bird
    (San Sal.); laughing pinder (Andros); laughy (Black)  [cf. Irel. laughing gull the herring gull EDD; cf. OED laughing in the names of animals, so called from their ...
  • law:
    more than the law allow [cf. OED law custom; customary rule or usage obs.-1535] phr. more than proper or customary: 1936 More bell ringin' an' ...
  • lawful
    [cf. Krio loful pikin legitimate child KED; OED, of offspring: born in lawful wedlock, e.g. "lawful issue"] adj. (of children) legitimate: I'm the lawful one! (Eleu.), (Black) ...
  • lawless
    [Car.; OED, unbridled; cf. also OED law correctness of conduct obs.→1440] adj. crude; lacking a sense of decorum: A lawless laugh (San Sal.). (Black) ...
  • lay-back
    [cf. US slang lay to have coitus with someone DAS] adj. pregnant: 1980 (Dorsett 4). Her and Annie, all two of them lay-back the same time (Nassau). ...
  • lay off
    [OED, to take a rest, dial. and US] v.i. 1. to lie back and relax: 1918 He laid off jus' de same as if he was dead (Parsons ...
  • lay on your chest
    or stomach [Trin. idem (Winer p.c.); cf. OED lie on the stomach of food: to be felt as oppressive obs.→1711; cf. Brit., US dial. lay lie] v. phr. ...
  • lazy tree
    [OED lazy applied to things, places, or conditions favourable or appropriate to laziness] n. a large shade tree with a bench for resting and conversing. cf. GABBY-BENCH, ...
  • le
    See LE' GO, LE'S. ...
  • leaf
    [W Car.; cf. Réunion Cr. Fr. fey koko (lit. leaf coconut) idem (Chaudenson 1974:212)] n. palm frond: 1966 Take a couple of coconut leaves (Crowley 109). 1977 ...
  • leaf-of-life
    [Car. idem "any leaf of which, dropped on the ground, sprouts a new plant at each indentation in its edge (this probably explains the origin of the name, ...
  • leakening
     [stem from present participle leakin' + -ing; cf. OED leak v.t. to let (water etc.) in or out through a leak] v. leaking: It leakening water (Exuma). (Black) ...
  • lean up
    [by analogy to lean down] v. phr. to stop leaning; to stand up. (Nassau) ...
  • learn
    /loyn/ [Car.; cf. Brit., US dial, learn to teach "now vulgar" OED; cf. Scots leir (and cognate German lehren) idem CSD) v. to teach: 1880 ...
  • learn to know
    [ probably a blending of learn and get to know, but cf. German kennenlernen (lit. learn to know) idem, possibly with Brit. dial. cognates] v. phr. to ...
  • leather-winged bat
    [cf. Bajan leather bat (Colly­more 16), Jam, leather-wing idem OED, US dial. South leather-winged bat WSC, all Brit. dial. North, West EDD] n. the bat (the ...
  • leave
     [cf. LEFF leave, by hypercorrection] v. left (over): 1966 There's one more hand [of ba­nanas] leave (Crowley 53). Ain't nothing leave (ibid 113). (Black) leave away [from a blending ...
  • leave-over
    [W Car.; by hypercorrection of LEFF leave] n. 1. left-savers, food. (Eleu) 2. an inherited wardrobe: leave-over clothes (Eleu). cf. BANG-BANG ...
  • lee.
    See LEETLE. ...
  • leff, lef, left
    /lef/ [Atlantic; cf. Brit. dial. West lef leave EDD] v, to leave: 1918 Stay here an' bury yourself in de san' an' jus' lef out one ...
  • Leekie
    [etym. uncertain, but cf. DHS Leek Welsh­man, and Scots leeky of the hair: much in need of curling tongs CSD] n. a Chinese person (slang). cf. WONG (Nassau, ...
  • leetle
    /liytal/, lee /liy/ [cf. Belize lii little (Dayley); leetle in Gul. (Gonzales 1922:310), US Black (Parsons 1917b:224); cf. OED leetle a jocular imitation of a hesitating or deliberately ...
  • le' go
    /legow/ [Atlantic; cf. colloq. Brit. leggo idem but also São Tomé Port. Cr. lε 'ga idem (cf. Port. largar (Ivens Ferraz 1979:55), Haitian lage idem HCEFD, and Pap. ...
  • le's
    [W Car.; US Black idem ESEA; Labov (1972: 114 ff.) notes a similar assimilation of /t/ in US Black i's it's, da's that's, wha's what's (all ...
  • less'n, lessen
    conj. 1. [cf. OED less than unless obs. →1772; US dial. idem ADD] unless: 1969 It ain't gon grow lessen he bud it wid a good healty ...
  • let
    [probably a hypercorrection of make let; cf. SA let to cause to do, to make: translation of Afrikaans laat idem (but cf. Dutch laten let [only])] ...
  • letter-opener
    [from shape] n. an eel-like fish, Ophidion nocornis: 1968 (Böhlke 168). (San Sal) ...
  • libary
    [also US dial. ADD, US Black ESEA] n. library: [sign in Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera] LIBARY. (Black) ...
  • lice plant
    [cf. OED lice-bane, obs. →1755] n. a vine (sp?) with a purplish flower. cf. LICE ROOT (Eleu.) ...
  • lice root
      [cf. LICE PLANT] n. a woody vine, Rhabdadenia sagraei: 1920 (Britton 337).     ...
  • lick
    [Car.; also But, dial. EDD] n. a blow. (Gen.) —v. 1. to strike: 1966 He grab one piece of crab sticks. . . All about he ...
  • lickerish
    [Car. ´greedy'; OED, fond of delicious fare] adj. (of infants) inclined to taste every­thing. (Nassau) ...
  • lickin'
      [US dial. idem 'exceedingly (tasty)' ADD] adj. excellent; first-rate. (Nassau)     ...
  • lick spittle
    [ cf. 1811 DVT idem 'talebearer'] v. phr. to gossip: She always lickin' spittle (Inagua). (Black) ...
  • lick-um-down
    [cf. LICK v. 1, UM] n. (in wrestling) throwing one's opponent or knocking him down by any means available: 1940 [to wrestlers] No prapra, no ...
  • licorice vine, liquorice vine
    /likrish, likwish, likrid/ n. 1. [Car. idem DJE] a vine, Abrus precatorius, having red seeds with black spots. = BEAD VINE, BLACK-EYED SUSAN, MACKABEE, RED-EYE SUZY, ...
  • licorice weed, liquorice weed
     [DIE idem] n. a plant, Scoparia dulcis: 1889 (Gardner 396). (San Sal.) ...
  • lie
    [ cf. Gul. lie, Sra. lay tori tale, riddle (Dillard 1977:141; cf. also DJE nine-night lie idem and Réunion Cr. Fr. zistwa:r mãte:r idem (Chauden­son ...
  • life-leaf
    [cf. LEAF-OF-LIFE ideM] n. a plant, Bryophyllum pinnatum: 1956 (Higgs 10). I boil the life-leaf. . . give him two draught of that or three, cough ...
  • lift, lift up
      /lif op/ v.i. 1. [Car.] to get up and leave; to move on. (Black)   2. (of airplanes) to lake off: The plane lif' yet? ...
  • lift wing
    /lif wing/ v. phr. (of birds) to flap the wings to take off or, while flying, to raise the wings to brake and land. (Andros, ...
  • ligdum vitae, ligdel vitae
    (Mayag.); liglum vitae (Inagua) n. the lignum vitae tree, Guiacurn officinale. = BUCKLY WHITEY, NIGLUM VITAE ...
  • light
    1. v. [DJE idem; OED idem obs. →1596] (of day) to become light: 1918 Jus' as day light in de morning, dey went (Parsons 137). (Gen.) ...
  • light bread
    [US dial. South idem, common wheat or loaf bread as opposed to bread cornbread WEA; cf. LIGHT 2] n. bread leavened with yeast as opposed ...
  • light bulf
    [W Car. idem, where Miskito /f, p/ alternation may have influenced light bulb after devoicing of final consonant to bulp (cf. M. selp, self, both ...
  • lighter
    n. 1. [cf. OED, a flat-bottomed boat or barge for (un)loading ships that cannot dock; see quot.]  a teenage boy who is shy of girls: ...
  • lightning strikes
    [US dial. South idem; from strike v.] n. pl. bolts of lightning. (Black) ...
  • light-skin
    [Car.] adj. having a light-brown complexion. (Gen.) ...
  • light up
    [cf. W3 lit up drunk slang] adj. intoxicated: He light right up (Exuma). ...
  • lightwood
    [US dial. idem, very resinous pine or other wood used for kindling ADD, from its use in lighting fires] n. 1. a tree, Lasciocroton macrophyllus: 1910 ...
  • lignum aloes
    [OED idem, aloes (wood)] n. a shrub (sp?): 1731 The wood is of a very dark brown color . . in smell and appearance re­sembling ...
  • like
    conj. [cf. Car. same like same as DJE] as (with comparisons): 1936 Now dey don' have t' sen' no monument big like dat t' de ...
  • like
    v. [also US colloq. (used by adolescents)] to be sexually attracted to (someone): All the boys was my cousin-dem and you couldn't like your own ...
  • liken, liking
    [cf, LIKE V. and OED liken to be assigned by repute as a lover obs, ±1575] v. to court: When we was young, anybody who ...
  • like peas
    [Trim idem (Winer)] phr. in abundance: He get licks like peas (Nassau). ...
  • lily
    [Atlantic; "iteration of Ii, a reduced form of little" DJE; cf. LEE] adj. little: 1925 Look how dar lily boy do yer (Finlay 293). (Black) ...
  • lily tree
    [from the appearance of its flowers] n, the maguey plant, Agave americana. = FLOWERING ALOE, SPIKED ALOE (Black) ...
  • limber
    /limba/ v. I. [Car. idem; OED, supple, lithe] to bend over. (Black) 2. [W3 idem "usually with up"] to relax one's muscles. (Mem) —n. [cf. LIMBER Y. ...
  • limberting
    [probably from limber adj. + thing] n. a shrub (sp?) used medicinally. = GLOVE BUSH (Andros) ...
  • limber up
    [cf. Brit. dial. North, Mid lamper to walk heavily EDD] v. phr. to walk with a limp. (Andros, ...
  • Limburger vine
    [cf. OEDS II Limburger a strong- smelling cheese; from its odor? ] n. a plant, Morinda roic: 1977 (Patterson 121). cf. WILD MULBERRY (Inagua) ...
  • lime conch
     [etym?] n. a variety of conch (Strombus sp.). (Black) ...
  • limit: make the limit
    [cf. speed limit] v. phr. to drive a vehicle at the maximum legal speed. (Exuma) ...
  • limpy up
    [cf. LIMBER UP, limp] adj. crippled: 1966 He start to go home now. All limpy up and bleeding (Crowley 55). (Black) ...
  • line
    [Gul. idem (Turner 1949:267); OED, a circle of the terrestrial sphere; probably from nautical usage] n. the island or place in question, as in UP ...
  • line: when the sun cross the line
    [cf. OED line a circle of the terrestrial sphere . .. the equi­noctial line, the equator; probably from nautical usage; cf. US dial, line storm ...
  • lined seahorse
     [from its markings?] n. a variety of seahorse, Hippocampus erectus: 1968 (Böhlke 183). cf. LION SEA-HORSE (San ...
  • line edge
    n. a style of plaiting STRAW1 together, leavings flattened edge of folds (Bannister display). (Inagua) ...
  • line off
    v. phr. I. [cf. US dial. South line out idem WES; cf. also Scots liner-out one who prefers the reading of a psalm line by ...
  • ling
     [from RING idem by /l, r/ alternation: cf. DJE lxi and US Black brack black (Bullock 1898: ...
  • lingy
    /linggi/ [cf. Sanskrit linga(m) idem, conceiv­ably brought from India by the British army like CHATTY] n. penis ...
  • link vine,
    link weed n. a climbing plant, Vanilla articulate: 1910 (Northrop 148). = WORMWOOD (San Sal.) ...
  • lion
    cf. DJE lion a "blood" about town, a "hot boy"; beyond its association with virility and strength, ...
  • lion lizard
    [OED idem, the basilisk (different sp.), from the comparison of its crest to a lion's mane] n. a lizard, Ameiva auberi. = BLUE TAILED LIZARD, ...
  • lion seahorse
    [from the mane-like growths around its head] n. a variety of seahorse (sp?). cf.  LINED SEAHORSE (Nassau, Mayag.) ...
  • lion tongue
    [cf. DJE idem "the Sansevieria, from the shape of the leaf" ] n. a plant (sp?). cf. WILD EDDY, SILK MANELLA (Andros, Adelaide) ...
  • lipton tea
    [from the brand name] n. commercially sold black tea, especially in bags, as opposed to BUSH TEA: She say she go draw some lipton tea ...
  • liquorice
     See LICORICE. ...
  • little
    [cf. OED little few, with plurals and col­lective singulars obs. →1660] adj. few (with plurals): Very little gardens are being kept (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • Little Red Men
    [cf. RED of European com­plexion] n. mythical creatures said to inhabit the island of Andros: 1966 The ...
  • little small
    [also US Black (Keiser 1969:56), Brit. colloq.; cf. US great big ADD] adj. very small: They don't want no little small banana to eat (Nassau). ...
  • little sour
    [cf. SOUR; by opposition to BIG SOUR bitter-sweet orange] n. the lime. (San Sal.) ...
  • live by olden-days time
    phr. to follow old customs: She still does live by olden-days time—she's cook the peas and rice right in the yard (Long). (Black) ...
  • live (doing)
    [cf. Sp, vivo cantando (lit. I-live singing) I'm always singing] v. phr. to do con­tinuously or habitually; always do: We live hearing this saying (COB). ...
  • live-forever
     (cf. LEAF-OF-LIFE, LIFE-LEAF n. a medicinal plant, Bryophyllum pinnatum: 1905 (Shattuck 207). 1978 (Higgs 7.). = PLOPPERS, PORPUS ...
  • live good
    [Car.] v. phr. to get along well: Dey living good, like breda (Nassau). (Gen.) ...
  • live story
    /layv stowri/ [W Car.] n. an eyewitness account. (Black) ...
  • lizard
     [from shape] n. penis (youth slang). cf. SLING YOUR LIZARD (Exuma, Eleu)     ...
  • Lizzie potato
    n. a variety of sweet potato: 1977 I helped to plant sweet potatoes. The "Lizzie" potato was known to grow quickly (Albury 27). ...
  • loaded down
    adj. pregnant. cf. HEAVY DOWN (Black) ...
  • loaden
    [OED idem, obs. except dial.; US dial. idem ADD] v. to load: They loaden the boat now (Eleu.). ...
  • loaf off
    [from loaf n.] v. phr. to separate (bread dough) into loaves: You knead you bread, let it rise a little bit, then loaf it off ...
  • lobo
    /lówbow/ [cf. Sp. lobo del mar or lobo marino (lit. sea wolf) seal] n. the West Indian monk seal, Monachus tropicalis, now extinct: 1978 He ...
  • lobster
    [cf. OED lob something pendulous, a lump dial.] n. dried nasal mucus. (White) ...
  • local
    [probably from expatriate use of local, perhaps influenced by low] adj. 1. humble, lowly : My supervisor never thought that a job was too local ...
  • lock
    [cf. Krio lok baffled, unable to reply (Hancock p.c.); from locked (in); cf. Haitian pran nan lak trapped HCEFD] adj. in a predicament: The woman ...
  • lodging
    [cf. OED lodge a shed or out-house dial.] n. a shed where crops are stored. (Exuma, Mayag.) ...
  • loggerhead
    [OED 1772 → but DJE 1707 →] n. a large, inedible sea turtle, Thalassochelys caretta: 1731 (Catesby II 38). (Gen.) ...
  • lolly
    [cf. Trin. lolo penis (Winer); etym. uncertain, but cf. Krio tololi male genitals, from Limba (Hancock p.c.)] n. the female genitals (child's word). cf. LALA ...
  • lone
    [OED, only obs. → 1602; alone obs. → 1817] adj. only; nothing but; many: 1979 Lone eyes start turnin' an cameras start flashin' (Smith 2). ...
  • long
    adj. 1. [Atlantic; OED idem → 1609 "now rare except in jocular use" but cf. also São Tomé Port Cr. lóngó and Kishinkongo -alambuka both ...
  • long-belly
    [Car.] adj. gluttonous. (Exuma) ...
  • long cord
    n. the foot-long seed pods of certain native trees. (White) ...
  • long dollars
    [cf. US Black money ain't long enough money isn't sufficient (Folb); cf. LONG 2] n. a great deal of money: You got to have long ...
  • long gaulin
    [also Vir. (Highfield), DJE, "evid. transf. from the name of the bird gaulin (heron)"] n. a tall, thin person: You nothin' but a long gaulin ...
  • long-leg
    [OED different sp.] n. type of large mosquito, especially the male: 1817 Long legs, moquitoes, and sand flies (Dowson 99). (Exuma, Eleu.) ...
  • long out
    [W Car.; cf. loll idem (Parsons 1918: 94)] v. phr. to extend (the tongue): 1966 B' Snake started longing out he tongue at B'Rabby (Crowley ...
  • long-tail crow
    [DJE idem] n. the smooth-billed ani, Crotophaga ani, a black bird related to the cuckoo: 1972 (Paterson 94). = (BLACK) CROW, BLACK BIRD, BLACK DAW, ...
  • long-tail dove
    [cf. DJE long-tailed pea-dove idem] n. the mourning dove, Zenaida macroura: 1972 (Paterson 85). (Inagua, White) ...
  • long time
    [Car.] adv. phr. a long time ago; for a long time: 1966 I been want somebody eat B' Booky long time (Crowley 56). 1977 I ...
  • long-time friends
    [cf. Cam. long-taym ancient CCD] n. friends of long standing; old friends: She tell me everything -- me and her is long-time friends (Nassau). (Gen.) ...
  • Long Tom
    [cf. LONG 1 tall] n. a tree, Citharexylum fruticosm: 1920 (Britton 371). ...
  • long years ago
    [cf. LONG 2; OED long years many years (rhetorical)] adv. phr. many years ago: Long Cay used to name Fortune Island long years ago (Crooked). ...
  • look
    [Atlantic; OED idem obs. → 1560; Brit. dial. Mid. idem EDD] v.t. to look at; examine: 1918 She look the old woman head and caught ...
  • looka
    [cf. OED look used to bespeak attention ... in modern colloq. use often look you (in representations of vulgar speech written look'ee); cf. US dial. ...
  • loose
    v. 1. [Atlantic; OED idem cast loose nautical, unfasten dial.; also Scots EDD] to let loose: 1918 B'o' Boukee loosed him (Parsons 16). (Black) 2. [by ...
  • loose stomach
    [cf. Sra. loesbere diarrhoea WST; cf. OED loose of the bowels: relaxed] n. diarrhea. cf. TIGHT BOWELS (Exuma, Eleu.) ...
  • Lordy!
    [also US Black ESEA; OED, US ... also Lordy massy (i.e., Lord have mercy)] intj. an exclamation of pain (used especially by children). (Black) ...
  • loss
    [Atlantic; cf. dial. loss lose in Brit. EDD, US South ADD] v. to lose: Not lossing the child's confidence (COB). (Black) ...
  • loss his nature
    [Trin. idem (Winer p.c.); cf. NATURE sexual drive; cf. US dial. South take his nature to unsex an animal DARE] v. phr. to become impotent: ...
  • lot
    [cf. OED lot upon to count on reckon upon obs. → 1662; now US dial. North ADD] v. to plan or expect: 1977  I lotted ...
  • loud-mouth
    /lawd mawt/ [OED, adj. noisy obs. → 1668] adv. loudly: 1936 I run over t' de telefome box an' start ... tawkin loud mout  (Dupuch ...
  • lousy
    [OED, mean, vile; Scots shabby CSD] adj. (of laughter) crude, malicious: a lousy laugh  (San. Sal.). (Black) ...
  • love vine, love wine
    [Trin. idem (Winder p.c.); probably from its use in an infusion "against sex weakness" (Higgs 1978: 14), but cf. US dial. South "love-wine: a yellowish, ...
  • loving bird
    n. the humming bird: 1918 Come a lovin' bird now, which you call hummin' bird (Parsons 112). = DOCTOR BIRD, GOD BIRD, HUMMER (San Sal.) ...
  • low
    adj. 1. [cf. OED, abject, base] in the phrase you (stoopin') low to make known the good deeds done for another in order to humiliate him. cf. THROW LOWNESS ...
  • lowance
    /láwans/ [OED idem, now dial.; the aphetic form of allowance] n. giving one's opponent another chance in playing marbles, ROUNDANCE, etc. (Gen.) ...
  • low blood
    [by shortening] n. low blood pressure: Doctor say I have low blood (Nassau). cf. HIGH BLOOD (Gen.) ...
  • low bush land
    [cf. BUSH] n. scrubland. cf. HIGH BUSH (Gen.) ...
  • low 'fro
    [cf. LOW adj. 2; cf. US Black (A)fro a natural hair style ... long, wolly (Major)] n. a short Afro hairdo. (Black) ...
  • lowness
    See THROW LOWNESS ...
  • Lucaik Islands
    [probably from LUCAYA + -ic (cf. Icelandic) but cf. LUCAYONEQUE ] n., Obs. former name for the Bahamas: 1644 Lucaik Islands, so near one another, as ...
  • Lucayan, Lucayon
    /luwkáyan/ [from Lucayan lukku-cairi island people (Craton 1962:18); cf. Arawakan lóko person, acáera island, cay (Taylor 1977:20 and p.c.)] n. the Lucayan Indians, an Arawakan-speaking people who inhabited ...
  • Lucaya(s), Lucayo(es)
    [cf. LUCAYAN and current Sp. Islas Lucayas and Fr. Lucayes the Bahamas] n. Obs. 1. former name of the Bahamas: 1601 They dressed a ship to cross ...
  • Lucayoneque, Lucaioneque
    [probably a blend of Lucayon and Sp. yucayeque (Indian) village by a 16th century Antillean Sp. shift from /l/ to /y/ (Álvarez Nazario 1977: 46, ...
  • luck seed, lucky nut
    [cf. Trin. lucky nut (Winer p.c.), US Black lucky bean (Dillard 1977:126)] n. the seeds of a shrub, picked and kept for luck: 1920 luck ...
  • luggages
    n. pl. pieces of luggage. cf. BAGGAGES (Exuma) ...
  • luggy
    [ cf. Belize lógi sluggish (Dayley); cf. OED lugging idem, Scots luggie idem EDD] adj. gorged; lazy: I shouldn't have eaten that pie; now I feel luggy ...
  • lulling time
    [cf. OED lull a brief period of intermission or quiescence in a storm; also fig.] n. a time without activity. (Nassau) ...
  • lunch bus
    n. a van selling cakes, drinks, chicken, fish, etc. = FOOD WAGON (Nassau) ...
  • Lutra
    (from Eleuthera by aphesis] n. or adj. (pertaining to) Eleuthera: Lútra style fish. (Black) ◊ The pronunciation /lúwtra/ is thought of as typical of other islanders by Eleutherans, who ...
  • lye barrel
    [cf. LYE WATER] n. a barrel for ashes: 1976 A "lye barrel" was. . . water tight, half-filled with water. Into this barrel was thrown the ...
  • lye water
    [cf. OED lye alkalized water, primarily that made by the lixiviation of vegeable ashes ... also water of lye (obs.)] n. 1. water from a LYE BARREL: 1977 ...
  • Language
    Bahamian terms referring to language suggest that Bahamians had a very accurate perception of the linguistic realities of their country long before linguists started trying ...