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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • oars
    /owz/ [from the plural] n. sing, or pl. an oar at the stern of a small boat for sculling. = SCULLING OARS (Black) ...
  • obeah
    obia /ówbiya/ [Pan-Creole; cf. LA Fr. obiah sortilège (Jourdain 1956:297), Cuban Sp. obi brujo (Ortiz 1924:384); cf. Efik ubio a charm, to cause sickness or ...
  • Obeah
    Obeah in the Bahamas is not a religion like voodoo in Haiti, but the two do have elements in common. Both involve a belief in ...
  • Obeah bush
    [from use as an antidote to obeah; cf. similar use of garlic in Europe] n. a plant, Petereria alliacea: 1920 (Britton 135). 1978 Obeah bush. ...
  • Obeah man
    [Car.; cf. OBEAH ] n. a practitioner of witchcraft: 1888 "Obeah-men". . are a species of African magicians, who, for a trifling consider-ation, will bewitch your ...
  • Obeah People
    [from purportedly widespread practice of OBEAH there] n. nickname for people from Cat Island. (Black) ...
  • Obeah snake
    [cf. OBEAH witchcraft] n. 1. any snake put under a magic spell to guard property against intruders and thieves: 1936 I-Jun peepul is sump'n cud ...
  • Obeah trap
    [cf. OBEAH witchcraft] n. a magic charm said to protect property by causing intruders to come to harm: 1936 I out in d' yard Tursday tyin' ...
  • Obeah woman
    [Car.; cf. OBEAH] n. a witch; a female practitioner of obeah: 1978 Some people said she was an obeah woman (Smith 24), (Black) ...
  • occurrent to
    [OED, liable to, exposed to obs. →1566; perhaps influenced by according to] prep. as a result of: If you can't last, occurrent to ya sickness, ...
  • ocean
    [cf. DJE ocean shark found out in deep water; cf. OED ocean the main or great sea] n. deep sea only, not including WHITE WATER or ...
  • ocean durgon
    See OCEAN TURBOT (Black); ocean tally (Andros, Nassau); ocean durgon (Eleu.) ...
  • ocean hole
    n. 1. a deep hole on land, filled with tidal water: 1888 An extraordinary sheet of water called "the Ocean Hole", which rises and falls ...
  • ocean jack
    [DJE idem "It is caught only in deep water or the ocean."] n. a fish, the amber jack (Seriola dumerili). (Black) ...
  • ocean surgeon
    n. a fish, A canthurus bahianus: 1968 (Böhlke 658). (Inagua) ...
  • ocean turbot (Black); ocean tally (Andros, Nassau); ocean durgon (Eleu.)
    [cf. DJE ocean turbot different sp.] n. a fish, Canthidermis sufflamen: 1980 (Carey 13). ...
  • off
    n. [from off the island] abroad: 1963 This man come from off and go straight to the well (Cottman 66). cf. AWAY —particle. [W Car.] used ...
  • off-black
    [cf. W3 off-white white tinged with another color] adj. of a somewhat lighter complexion than black: 1971 Starting with black at the bottom, through off-black, ...
  • offer
    [OED, indirect and direct obj., or direct obj. and to] v. to offer (with indirect but no direct object): 1966 Every time the woman offer ...
  • off side
    [0ED, adv. phr. away from one's own side] n. a place out of the way or off to one side: 1918 I was standin' on de ...
  • oily (nut), early nut
     óyli [from their high oil content] n. mature, dried coconuts. (Black) ...
  • okay, O.K.
    /owkéy/ [W Car.; W3 all right: cf. sim-ilar use of ALL RIGHT] intj. a greeting said in passing or parting. (Black) ...
  • okra, ochra
    /ówkra/; ochry /ówkri/ [cf. US dial. South okry okra ADD; cf. Igbo okura (Todd 1975:281)] n. a plant, Hibiscus esculentus, or its pods eaten as ...
  • old-day, olden-days, olden-time
    [elliptical: from the old (en) days] adj. old-fashioned: 1966 The gal going and get. . one of the old-day fan, and start fanning (Crowley 103). ...
  • old(er) heads
    [Car.; probably from a phrase such as "Older heads are wiser"] n. the older generation in a community, generally defined as people with gray hair: ...
  • old lady
    [US Black one's mistress or wife (Major); DHS one's wife or mother] n. one's girlfriend, wife or mother: Da's my old lady—she good beef (Nassau). ...
  • old lady mangrove
    [etym?] n. a tree, Rhizophora mangle: 1978 (Higgs 16). (Inagua) ...
  • old maid
    [OED, West Indian name of a plant, Vinca rosea] n. a plant: 1920 Catharanthus roseus (Britton 336). 1972 Vinca rosea (Durrell 86). cf. CHURCHYARD ROSE, SAILOR ...
  • old mama
    n. the game of tag;  the child who is "it" and has to tag the others is called the old mama. (Black) ...
  • old man
     [OED, W3 different sp.] n. ] . a tree, Guettarda krugii: 1977 (Patterson 67). = FROGWOOD(Gen.) 2. a tree, Diospyros crassinervis. = FEATHERBED BOARWOOD (Adelaide) ...
  • old man('s) beard
    [Car.; cf. Brit. dial. idem W3 and Scots auld-man's-beard CSD, both different sp.; from the plant's "thin, curly greyish stems... hanging from trees, electric wires, ...
  • old man('s) plum
    [cf. DEVIL('s) PLUM idem and DJE old man the Devil] n. a plant, Solanum havenense; its berry is said to be poisonous: 1905 (Shattuck ...
  • old sour
    [cf. old aged + SOUR lime] n. fermented lime juice, used as a condiment: 1978 Bahamian old sour:  two cups lime juice, one tablespoon salt. . ...
  • old-story
    /ówl stòwri,-stùri/ [cf. US Black ol’-timey story idem (Parsons 1917a:169)] n. a folk tale, often with animal characters referred to as B', brother: 1918 The ...
  • old wife
    [Atlantic; cf. Brit. dial. North ale wife different sp. EDD] n. 1. a fish: 1731 (Catesby 22). 1788 Old wife (Balistes vetula)(Schoepf 277). 2. a ...
  • old woman
    [DJE, EDD different sp.] n. a tree, Tabebuia bahamensis: 1977 Some of the natural trees are. . .old man and old woman (Albury 25). = ...
  • oleander moth
     [from its attraction to the shrub] n. a moth of the family Ctenuchidae resembling a wasp: 1978 (Campbell 14). ...
  • olive bark
    [W Car.; "from olive, probably alluding to the fruit, + bark. . .alluding to the use of the bark in tanning" DJE] n. the black ...
  • olive plum
    [W3 different sp.] n. a tree, the satin-leaf starapple (Chrysophyllurn oliviforme) or its fruit: 1946 (Morton 89). = DAMSON PLUM , WILD STAR-APPLE (Eleu., Mayag.) ...
  • olivewood
    [OED different sp.] n. a tree, Cassine xylocarpa: 1977 (Patterson 27). (Gen.) ...
  • on (1)
    [cf. Scots on in, about, regarding, of, for, to, at CSD; cf. also similar use of earlier general locative prep. DA] prep. 1. at, in: ...
  • on (2)
    prep. in various idioms: on catch [cf. OED catch fire become ignited] phr. on fire: 1918 When de fire was on ketch, put de piece ...
  • on the coast
    [referring to the west coast of Africa] phr., Obs. in the slave trade (euphemism): 1888 He was then for a time "on the coast" as ...
  • on the hill
    [cf. crazy hill, the old Bahamas General Hospital compound for psychiatric patients on a ridge overlooking Nassau, in use until the 1950's] phr. in or ...
  • ona
    /óhna/ [cf. Atlantic unu you pl. (Hancock 1969:62) from lbo unu idem (Turner 1949:203); cf. óna/ idem on Roatán, Bay Islands, Honduras (J. Ryan p.c.)] ...
  • onaself
    [cf. DNA -self] reflex. pron. yourselves: I say, "Ah well, now, don't worry onase'f (San Sal.). cf. YINNASELF, YOIJNAYSELVES ...
  • on-dying
     [cf. OED on formerly frequent in connexions in which a- is now usual.. on loud etc.; cf.a with be: engaged in arch. or dial. ..a-raising] ...
  • one
    [Atlantic] indefinite article a, an (unemphatic): 1918 B'o' Boukee run t'rough de bush, gone, hidin' one hole (Parsons 84). 1936 He hop in one dinghy ...
  • one day more 'an all
    [Gul. idem (Work 1919:441); cf. also Krio wan de ya idem KED, Cam. some day been de idem (Todd 1979), Haitian you jou idem (Gaujean ...
  • one-minded
    adj. 1.[W Car.; by contrast to a phrase such as of two minds] decisive; clear-headed. (Black) 2. unanimous. (Eleu., Nassau) ...
  • one mind tell me
     [Gul. idem (Writers' Program 1940:62); cf. MY MIND TELL ME and US colloq. "I had a mind to, . ."] n. phr. I had a vague, ...
  • one-one
    [Pan-Creole; cf. Haitian yun-yun (Sylvain 1936:73); cf. Port. Cr.  (Ivens Ferraz 1979: 59), Yoruba ok'pkan DYL, Bemba u-mo u-mo (Mann p.c.), Twi baako-baako (Aboagye p.c.), ...
  • one time
    [Pan-Creole; "abbreviation of at one time" DJE, cf. also Pap. un bez (Hoyer 98) and Fr. Cr. yon fwe both (lit. one time) immediately (Loftman ...
  • one time ago
     adv. phr. 1. a while ago: One time ago she didn't used to speak to people (Nassau). (Black) 2. a long time ago; back in ...
  • orchid tree
    [from its large, lavender flowers resembling orchids] n. a tree, Bauhinia sp.: 1971 (Rabley 51). = BUTTERFLY FLOWER (Gen.) ...
  • one two-three
    [cf. Sra. wan toe WST, Krio tu-tri KED, Trin. two tree (Winer), Gul. two-t'ree (Gon-zales 1922:336), all ´several'; cf. also ONE a, and Scots twa-three two ...
  • onions
    [cf. hernia /(h) óynya/] n. hernia. (Abaco, Inagua) ...
  • onliest
    /ównlis/ [Car., US Black; also dial. in Brit. North, West EDD and US South ADD] adj. only: 1940 Dat's de onliest thing we can do ...
  • ooman
    úmam/ [Atlantic; "a preservation of a former pronunciation which was good upper-class usage from the 17th into the 19th century in England" DJE; also dial. ...
  • oon.
    See OWN ...
  • open teeth
    n, teeth with gaps. (Black) ...
  • operate
    [Atlantic; OED, of drugs and medicines, as cathartics etc.: to act] v. to loosen the bowels as a cure for constipation or a cause of ...
  • orange apple
    [OED idem obs. 1561 only] n. the common or sweet orange, Citrus aurantium: 1889 (Gardner 370). = GOLDEN APPLE, FORBIDDEN FRUIT, OREENGE  (Inagua) ...
  • orchard
    [OED, a garden for herbs and fruit trees obs. →1388] n. 1. a pineapple field: 1880 In the "orchard" we crossed, the coconut had been ...
  • oreenge
    /aríynj/ [W Car.; cf. OED orenge to 1700's, Scots oreynzel n. the orange_ = FORBIDDEN FRUIT, GOLDEN APPLE, ORANGE APPLE  (Black) ...
  • other
    /óda/ [cf. NEXTother, plus hypercorrection; cf. Haitian lót idem HCEFD] adj. (in a series) next: One is gumelemi bark, the other one is five-finger, the ...
  • otherwise
     [cf. OED no other wise 1597 (standard US usage does not permit no, any, etc. before otherwise); cf. also "Otherwise than that, as the Bermudians ...
  • oughta coulda
     [from ought to + could have) v, phr. ought to have been able (permitted sequence). (Eleu.) ...
  • Our Father Prays (Praise, Prayer)
    [from the first line of the prayer, "Our Father, who art in heaven"; cf.PRAYS,PRAISE prayer, and note that dialect speakers can interpret Our Father as possessive ...
  • out
    v 1. [Car.; OED idem obs. →1621; aiso dial. in Brit. EDD, US South ADD] to put out (a light, etc.), to extinguish: 1918 My ...
  • outdoors
     [OED in the open air] adv, outside the home, as in an office: If a woman thinks she is capable of going outdoors and being ...
  • outen
    prep. [also Scots CSD, US dial. South WSCII out of: 1895 'E taken out 'is han'ke'chief outen 'is pocket (Edwards 91). (Black) —v. 1. [also ...
  • out island
    [OED, applied esp. to the Shetlands, Orkneys, Hebrides, and other smaller islands at a distance from the mainland of Britain; W3 an island other than ...
  • out-islander
     [cf. OUT ISLAND ] n. a native of any island of the Bahamas except New Providence: 1888 She lives in great comfort for an out-islander ...
  • out out
    v. 1. [E Car. (CoLlymore 83, Yansen 40); cf. OUT v. 1. + out particle] to extinguish: Out out the light (Exuma). He outing it out ...
  • out rider
    [Brit. motorcycle escort for dignitaries (Pye p.c.)] n. motorcycle policeman: In the Bahamas Police Force there are now women outriders. I remember when only men ...
  • outside
    [cf. OUTSIDE CHILD] adj. illegitimate: outside brother (Nassau). —adv. out of wedlock: I got two brother inside but I got—let me see—how much outside? (Andros). ...
  • outside child
     [Pan-Creole; cf. Haitian āfā-dɚhç (en-fant dehors) idem (HanCock:1969:56, 70); cf. lbo onye warnunilo (lit, person outside) idem (Okolo p.c.)] n. a child born out of ...
  • outside closet
     [cf. OED closet short for water closet] n. privy; outside toilet: 1978 D' only paper we had was d' Tribune an' Montgomery Ward catalog all ...
  • outside relative
    [i.e. outside the immediate family] n. a remotely related member of the family, such as a second or third cousin. (Nassau) ...
  • out somebody's light
    [DAE, DHS cf. OUT v. 1. extinguish, and DHE out to kill] phr. to kill someone (underworld term?). (Black) ...
  • out something off
    [cf. OED out to blot out obs. →1653] v. to erase something (from a blackboard): He outin' it off (San Sal.). cf. OUTEN V. 2, ...
  • out the way
    [cf. OED out of the way seldom met with, peculiar, devious; cf. OUT out of] adj, t. unusual: 19361 didn' tink it wuz out o' ...
  • out toilet
    [cf. US outhouse idem + toilet] n. a privy or outside toilet. (Inagua, Mayag.) ...
  • out town
    [cf. go out; also downtown, uptown] phr. into town: I goin' out town (Nassau). out-town people n. people who live just outside of town. (Black) ...
  • oven
    /ówvin/ [Atlantic pronunciation (Hancock 1969:54); cf, similar vowel correspondence in HONGRY, OGLY; cf. Scots oven a shallow pan or metal pot with lid, in which ...
  • over
     [OED, at an end] v. to be finished: 1940 D' fire done over (Dupuch 59). The fair starts at 12 a.m. and overs at 12 ...
  • over back
     n. 1. area from the harbour toward the ocean: 1977 (Albury 157). (White) 2. a plot of land used for farming. (Abaco) 3. an area ...
  • overcast
    /ówvalcyas/ [OED, overspread with clouds] n. an all-day drizzle. (Gen.) ...
  • overnight food
    [ from leaving over night] n. leftover food. Her husband say he won't eat no overnight food (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • oversleep yourself
    [also US dial. South DARE] v. to oversleep: 1966 He oversleep himself(Crowley 54). (Gen) ...
  • over the hill
    [the US, Brit. slang meaning 'past one's prime' seems unfamiliar to Bah.; the term appears to be purely topographical, referring to the ridge separating the ...
  • own
    /own/, oon /uwn, un /on/ [Atlantic; cf. OED, 1743 "Two swords of the Captain's own"; also US dial. South ADD] particle forming poss. pron. (after ...
  • own personal self
     [W Car.; also US dial. South (Green)] n. phr. (for) one's own benefit: He buy that piece of land for his own personal self (Rag-ged). ...
  • own something to somebody
    [cf. OED own to acknowledge something in its relation to oneself ...to confess to be valid (with simple obj. or reflexive obj. and complement)] v. ...