P

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • pa
    /pah/ [OED, childish short form of papa father; US dial. idem ADD; cf. Haitian pè (Gaujean p.c.) and Reunion Cr. Fr. pa (Chaudenson 1974:40) idem] ...
  • pabble-delicious
    [probably from palatable; cf. PALLITARY] adj. delicious. (Eleu.) ...
  • pain-a-belly bush
     [cf. PAIN-A-BELLY n. a plant, Aloe Vera, used to relieve intestinal discomfort. = ALOES, BELLY-ACHE PLANT,HEALING PLANT ...
  • painful
    painful [OED idem, 1612 only] adj. (of persons) suffering pain: 1963 I was very painful for two days (Cottman 123). He was in an accident ...
  • pacific
    pacific [from specific by simplification of initial consonant cluster] adj. specific: They can be placed in a pacific field for [job] training (COB). <Nassau> ...
  • packing house
    packing house [cf. OED packhouse a building for storage; cf. Pap, pacus store (Hoyer 21)] n. a shed for storage. <Black> ...
  • paddle
     v. [OED to row lightly] to row with two oars, as oppsed to sculling with one. (Gen.) —n. [OED, a sort of short oar used ...
  • pain-a-(belly)
     /peyn-/ ; /piyn-/ (Eleu.) [cf. DJE pain-a-ears] n. an ache, especially a stomach ache: He eat one small little bit of that barracuda and he ...
  • pain-in-back
     [from medicinal use] n, a shrub: 1920 Pain-in-back. . .Trema lamarckiana (Britton 104). 1977 Pain-in-back. . .Bunchosa glandulosa (Patterson 79). (Inagua, San Sal.) ...
  • pallitary
     [from palate + -ary forming adj.] adj. delicious. (Acklins, Exuma) ...
  • palming
    palming [OED palm to stroke with the palm of the hand] n. masturbation. cf. MISS PALMER (Gen.) ...
  • pammy gaulinny
     /pámi góhlini/ [cf. pommy sickle and gaulin crab] n. a small crab (sp?). (Andros) ...
  • pammy sickle
     pammy sucker. See DANNY SIN EEL. ...
  • pamolly
    /pamóbli/ (Exuma, San Sal.); pamoley /pamówli/ (Exuma); panelly /panéli/ (Adelaide) [etym?] n. a swelling from a bump on the head; often in the phrase: pamolly ...
  • panama
    [from its resemblance to the hat?] n. a kind of shell (sp?) found on the seashore: 1977 Some shells. . .like the panama and the ...
  • pancake bush
     See POUND-CAKE BUSH ...
  • panelly
    panelly. See PAMOLLY. ...
  • panny-cake
    panny-cake n. 1. [US dial. idem DARE] a pancake: Nancy fry panny-cakes this morning for break-fast (Nassau). cf. GRIDDLE-CAKE (Gen.) 2. [Car.] a thick, deep-fried ...
  • panny sickle, pansicker
     See BANNY SINKEL. ...
  • pantry
     [OED, a room in which provisions are kept n. 1. dining room. (Black) 2. kitchen. (Eleu., Andros) ...
  • panty
    panty [W Car.; back formation from panties] n. women's underpants. (Gen.) ...
  • papa, pappy; poppa, poppy
     [OED papa term of address for father; US dial. idem ADD] n. 1. a term of address to one's grandfather: 1966 (Otterbein 125). We say ...
  • papaw, pawpaw, papau, papue
     /papóh/ [Car.; cf. OED papaw idem from Sp., Port. papaya from Carib; cf. Taino papaya, Arawak papáia (Taylor 1977:21)] n. a tree, Carica papaya, or ...
  • paper
     [cf. Scots paper bank-notes CSD] n. money (street talk): 1974 (King 26). ...
  • papyeh
     /pahpyéy/ [Haitian papye legal document HCEFD; from Fr. papiers papers] n. legal papers, especially a work permit (used with Haitians): You got papyeh? (Exuma). ...
  • parade
    parade [Brit., in names of streets with rows of parch shops] n. a row of shops or small businesses: 1977 St. Anne Society--that's on the ...
  • parch
    parch' /pahch/ [W Car.; from patch] v. to repair; to patch. (Gen.) ...
  • parch (2)
    patch /pa(h)ch/ [Atlantic; cf. OED parch to dry, shrivel; US dial, to roast ADD] v. to toast or roast (especially grains): The peanuts are usually ...
  • parents
    parents [OED a person who exercises the functions of a parent] n, parents or grandparents: We were brought up by my mother, grandmother and grandfather. ...
  • parma city
     [from spermaceti by simplification of initial consonant cluster and influence from city] n. spermaceti, a fatty substance obtained from whales and used to waterproof sails. ...
  • paroquet
    paroquet /páraket/ [OED variant of parakeet, a small member of the parrot order] n. 1. a bird, the black-faced finch (Phonipara bicolor): 1880 (Cory 91). ...
  • parrot wood
     [DJE idem (sp?)] n. a tree, Buxus bahamensis, with mottled bark and yellow fruit: 1977 (Patterson 81). = CRISPY WOOD(Inagua) ...
  • partner
    /páhdna/ [Atlantic; US dial. idem ADD; from partner, possibly influenced by Brit. dial. North paddy bricklayer's labourer EDD] n. close friend, companion (used between men). ...
  • partridge
     [OED, DJE different sp.] n. a bird, the Key West quail dove (Geotrygon chrysia): 1960 (Bond 108). ...
  • pass
    pass n. [W Car.; OED, a ticket authorizing free travel] passage; fare: They pay my pass (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • pass (2)
     n. [cf. pass to evacuate (the bowels) W3] bowel movement: 1980 The baby's constipated —she ain' had a pass for two days (Carey 15). (Eleu.) ...
  • pass (3)
     v. [W Car.; cf. Biblical it came to pass and Sp., Port. pasar idem] to happen. ...
  • passing jack
    [from its seasonal passing through local waters in schools] n. a dark-colored jackfish, Caranx lugubris: 1905 (Shattuck 295). 1928 Fried Gogoleye [and] Passing Jack are ...
  • pass my gold ring
     phr. a game usually played by girls: 1977 (Albury 103).  ...
  • pass over
     v. phr. to rub (an ointment, etc.) over part of the body: She pass the soap over her face (Nassau). ...
  • patty
    patty. See HOTTY PATTY. ...
  • paulin
    paulin /póhlin/ [Car.; OED, trade name for water-proofed canvas; nautical tarpaulin covered with tar vs. paulin covered with paint (Smyth)] n. a piece of waterproofed ...
  • pault
    pault. See POLT. ...
  • paw
     /poh/ [US dial. father ADD] n. a term of address to one's grandfather. cf. PA, PAPA (GM.) ...
  • pawg
    pawg. See PORG. ...
  • pawnga
    See PONGA. ...
  • pawpaw
    See PAPAW . ...
  • pawpaw bird
    [cf. PAPAW] n. a bird, Margorops fuscatus: 1880 (Cory 47). = BLACK THRASHER, JACK BIRD(Gen.)  ...
  • payana
    [etym?] n. an edible sea crab, probably Callinectes sp. cf.  JOE SANKY (Adelaide) ...
  • peach
    DAB, a charming girl; from color and tex-ture of skin] n. a beautiful girl of medium-dark complexion. (San Sal.) ...
  • pealt
    [from peeled by devoicing of final conso-nant] v. past participle stripped of outer layer (of sugar cane): 1977 Sugar canes were also pealt, or stripped ...
  • peanut cake
    [Trin.idem (Winer)] n. peanut brittle, a hard candy made of peanuts and melted sugar: She sell benny-cake, peanut cake, round-the-world—plenty things (Nassau). = GRANNY CAKE ...
  • peanut snail
    [from appearance of shell] n. a land snail, Cerion sp.: 1978 (Campbell 91). ...
  • pear, peer
    /pia/ n. [Car.; from similarity of shape to that of the northern pear] the avocado tree, Persea gratissima, or its fruit: 1976 Pear and bread ...
  • pear
    /pia/ v.t. [OHS, to obtain money from both sides...the making of pairs, double-crossing; cf. also OED peer v.t. to equal in rank] to betray (a ...
  • pear-leaf tea
    [cf. PEAR n.] n. a hot drink made from an infusion of the leaves of the avocado tree, drunk at breakfast by older Bahamians: 1976 ...
  • pearl edge
    [W3 pearl Brit. to finish an edge with picot (small ornamental loops)] n. a style of plaiting STRAW', leaving one edge looped (Bannister display). (Andros, ...
  • peas(e)
    n. 1. [Atlantic; OED, singular form was peas(e) until c. 1600, when new sing. pea arose (cf. Fr. pois, pease porridge, etc.); cf. Haitian pwa ...
  • peas(e) and grits
    n. 1. a traditional dish, made of PIGEON PEAS and hominy GRITS cooked together: Most people does like the pease and rice, more'n pease and ...
  • peas(e) and rice
    [W Car, rice and peas idem] n. 1. a traditional dish of PIGEON PEASand rice cooked together with tomato sauce and seasonings: 1918 Heavy pots ...
  • peas tree
    cf. TREE plant] n. a pea or bean plant: My peas tree ain't do good this year (Andros). (Black) ...
  • peasy, peasie
    [Gni. idem (Stewart p.c.); cf. PEAS a tight curl but cf. also Car. Sp. pasa pe/o de negro, de rizo pequeñio y apretado (Alvarez Na-zario ...
  • pee-a-bed
    See PISS-A-BED. ...
  • peel, peeled
    [cf. W Car, peel to shave; see PEEL-HEAD ] adj. bald: 1918 An' he flog B'o' Boukee wi' dat (rod) until he was peeled (Parsons ...
  • peeled string
     [cf. STRING] n. a style of plaiting STRAW ¹ (Wyannie Malone Museum). ...
  • peel-head
    [Car.; cf. Sra, piri-ede (lit, peeled head) bald head (Echteld 163); the considerable seman-tic jump from peel, to strip something of its outer layer, points ...
  • peer
    See PEAR. ...
  • peg
    [W Car.; OED idem, same quot.] n. a prong fastened to a harpoon: 1731 Turtle are most commonly taken at the Bahama Islands. . .by ...
  • peggy
    [etym?] n. a spider (sp?); it is small and grayish and bites. (Andros) ...
  • pen-a-ma-dick
    See PITY-MA-DICK. ...
  • pen-and-ink
    [from the ink-like juice of its black berries.] n. a plant, Scaevola plumieri. = BLACK SOAP, INK BERRY (San Sal.) ...
  • pencil tree
    [from shape of branches; OED differ-ent sp.] n. a tree, Euphorbia tirucalli, with an irritating sap: 1978 Pencil tree. . .cut section and apply milk-like ...
  • people
    [W Car.; US Black idem (Parsons 1917a: 187); OED, human beings] adj. human: 1918 Gaul'in' wife. . .turn people befo' her husban' come (Parsons 39). ...
  • pepper
    n. [cf. US pepper, condiment made from the plant Piper nigrum W3] chili pepper, of the genus Capsicum; US pepper is always referred to as ...
  • pepper berry
    [OED no sp. given] n. a tree, Petitia domingensis, with red berries. = FOWL BERRY, BASTARD STOPPER (Adelaide) ...
  • pepper bush
    [OED, W3 different sp.] n. a shrub, Croton bahamensis: 1920 (Britton 224). (Gen.) ...
  • pepper conch
     n. 1. [from speckles] the pink conch, Strombus gigas. (Andros) 2. [from taste] a variety of conch, Strombus sp., which tastes peppery. (San Sal.) ...
  • pepper wasp
    /pépa wahs/ [cf. paper wasp (Polistes sp.)] n. a small red wasp (sp.?), its sting is not as bad as that of other species. (Andros) ...
  • pepted
    (etym?] adj. in a dilemma: I know you pepted (Nassau). cf. LOCK (Black) ...
  • percenter
    [etym?] n. a former girlfriend. (Inagua) ...
  • perfer
    [by metathesis] v. to prefer: Some students perfer to study in the library (COB). (Nassau) ...
  • peter
    [etym. uncertain, but possibly an avoidance term for cooter turtle; see COOT] n. a fresh-water turtle, Chrysemys felis: 1978 Modern-day Cat Islanders. . are fond ...
  • Peter ain&#39; better than Paul
    [probably a Biblical reference to Christ's disciples] phr. You're no better than I am. (Nassau) ...
  • peter-ma-dick
    See PITY-MA-DICK. ...
  • petty shop
    [OED, only one quot. 1831] n. a very small general store: 1936 petty shop: small store carrying "mix erbs", fried fish, etc. (Dupuch 129). 1976 ...
  • phthisic
    See TISSICK. ...
  • piano
    /payána/ [US dial. idem arch. ADD] n. piano (old pronunciation). (Inagua>) ...
  • piazza
    /piyáza/ [Atlantic; OED, now rare; US dial. ADD] n. the roofed verandah of the older-style Bahamian house, sometimes enclosed with jalousies (now usually called a ...
  • pick
    n. [US Black pick a comb used by Black people for natural and Afro hair styles (Claerbaut); cf. Brit. dial. pick hay-fork OED] a short ...
  • pick (2)
    v. 1. [cf. OED pick (of a bird) to peck; (of an insect) to puncture obs. →6451 to bite; to peck: 1918 Mr. Fowl, if ...
  • pick (3)
    v. 1. [Car.; Brit. dial. Mid idem EDD; US dial, to gather (eggs) ADD] to gather, collect: pick shells; cf. PICK UP¹); (Mayag., Inagua) 2. ...
  • pick-and-choose
    [Atlantic; OED, v. phr. to select fastidiously)] adj. 1. finnicky; hard to please: When people is pick-and-choose, they a bit funny or choicy (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • pickaninny, pickin, pickny
    [Atlantic; OED, W3 pickaninny Negro child, SA piccanin idem; from Port. pequenino very little (one), from pequeno little + -ino (diminutive suffix)] n. 1. baby ...
  • pick chance
    v. phr. to select an opportune moment: 1950 The captain steadied my wife while she "picked chance" to step down into the dinghy (McCutcheon 320). ...
  • pickcheely
    (Nassau); pickereely (Andros); pickery (San Sal.) [DJE petchary, Haitian pipirit HCEFD and Car. Sp, pitirre idem; from its call "pecheery", perhaps influenced by PICKER 2 ...
  • picker
    n. 1. [cf. OED pick over select the best from a group] a scavenger; a person who rummages through refuse for useful articles. (Nassau) 2. [W ...
  • pick house
    [etym. uncertain, but cf. OED picket post driven into ground and pack house a build-ing for storage] n. a shelter without walls having a roof ...
  • pick in
    See PICK³2. ...
  • pickle
    [cf. OED, brine for culinary purposes] n. brine left after salt crystals have been collected from salt ponds; 1909 In three weeks of dry weather ...
  • pickle
    [from prickle by loss of /r/, perhaps influenced by PICK²] n. thorn. (Mayag.) ...
  • pick out
    See PICK¹ v. ...
  • pick peter
    [see PICKCHEELY] n. the grey kingbird, Tyrannus dominicensis: 1960 (Bond 150). 1977 There are many kinds of birds here. . .tobacco doves, pick-peters, woodpeckers (Albury ...
  • pick somebody&#39;s mouth
    [Atlantic; a calque: cf. Twi tie nano (lit. pick mouth) elicit information (K. Aboagye p.c.)] v. phr. to get information by engaging someone in seemingly ...
  • pick up for somebody
    phr. to take somebody's side in an argument. (Andros, Eleu.) ...
  • pick up (1)
    v. phr. 1. [cf. OED pick idem] to gather (fruit, etc.): 1966 He pick up a few [nuts off a tree] (Crowley 128). cf. Pick3 ...
  • pick up (2)
    [cf. Picx2 3] to remove meat from bones: 1918 He started pickin' dis chicken up (Parsons 149). (Black) ...
  • pick up your foot
    [Car.; Gul. idem (Gonzales 1924: 13); DJE "cf. Twi ma wo náŋ so, lift your feet, i.e. quicken your steps., make haste (Christaller); perh. also ...
  • picky
    [see PICKY-HEAD and PICK' Y.] adj. (of women's hair) short, tightly curled: 1971 "nappy", "pickey", or "peasie" hair (McCartney 68). (Gen.) ...
  • picky-head
    [cf. Car, picky-picky head idem DJE] n. an uncomplimentary term for a woman with hair that is short and tightly curled: 1966 Picki-head: hair of ...
  • piddy
    [cf. OED piddle to urinate; US idem urine] n. urine: I want it [the coffee] strong -- I don't want no cow piddy (Abaco). ...
  • piece (1)
    [W Car.; cf. OED, a limited portion of land, enclosed; cf. US Black "piece of tobacker.. field" (Parsons 19I7a:186)] n. a field with a single ...
  • piece (2)
    n. 1. [Car.; from piece as a quantifier with mass nouns, e.g. a piece of bread (furniture, advice, etc.), possibly converging with uses in other ...
  • piece material
    [OED piece goods idem] n. cloth sold by the piece rather than by the yard. (Long) ...
  • piece of leg
    [cf. DHS piece of tail, US piece of ass idem; cf. leg as euphemism for ass in KISS MY LEG] n. phr. sexual intercourse, especially ...
  • piece-piece
    [cf. OED piece by piece; by reduplication of piece] adv. bit by bit; gradually: I find out about it piece-piece (Nassau). cf. ONE-ONE (Black) ...
  • piflicated
    [cf. OED spiflicate to confound or over-come colloq. or humorous, and US dial. pifflicated drunk DARE] adj. very drunk, (White) ...
  • pig
    [W Car.; OED idem; standard distinction not usually made in US] n. immature pig, as opposed to an adult hog: 1966 They had. . .a ...
  • pigeon berry
    [OED Duranta plumieri in Bermuda; W3 different sp.] n. 1. a tree, Duranta repens, with round orange fruit: 1977 (Patterson 63). = BITTER-SWEET 2. a ...
  • pigeon gun
    [OED, gun for pigeons] n. a rifle: 1936 wun car pass wid a bunch o' fellers. . .holdin' pidgin gun in wun han' an' revolver ...
  • pigeon peas
    [Car.; from use as food for pigeons but cf. also Haitian pais pigeon (Faine 1974: 352)] n. the small, reddish bean (Cajanus cajan) used in ...
  • pigeon plum
    [OED, W3 different sp. of Coccoloba] n. a tree (Coccoloba retusa or C. floridana) with small black fruit: 1731 Pigeon Plum. . .grows on rocks ...
  • pigeon shot
    [for shooting pigeons] n. fine shot for a shot gun. (White) ...
  • pillow
    See RICE BELOW ...
  • pilcher
    (Eleu., Mayag.); pincher (Black) [cf. DJE pincher idem; OED pilcher pilchard obs. → 1796] n. a small fish, Harengula sp., used for bait: Pincher is ...
  • pills
    [from the pl.] n. a pill: 1966 He took a Doan 's Kidney Pills (Crowley 106). (Black) ...
  • pilly-ma-dick
    PITY-MA-DICK. ...
  • pimp
    v. [cf. Guy. pimpish observing slyly (Rickfor 1976: 12), Vir. pimpin' spying (Roy); Australian pimp n. sneak, informer W3; DAE pimp v. do mean action ...
  • pimp, pimper
    n. [cf. PIMP v. 1] a person who passes on incriminating information; a police informer: 1981 A key spokesman for the FNDM in Grand Bahama ...
  • pincher
    See PILCHER. ...
  • pine
    [Car.; from Am. Sp. pina, anglicized in 1600's DJE] n. the pineapple plant, Ananas comosus, or its fruit: 1880 The pines ceased bearing (Ives 104). ...
  • pineapple
    [from its resemblance to the skin of the fruit] n. a style of plaiting STRAW1. (Gen.) ...
  • pineapple land
    [from its suitability for growing pineapples] n. See the quot.: 1905 Red land or "pine-apple land" consists of a red clay loam (Shattuck 163).= RED ...
  • pine-slip
    [cf. PINE] n. the leafy crown of the pineapple, used for planting: 1895 B'Goat was eatin' the pine-slips (Edwards 81). (Gen.) ...
  • pine-yard
    [from OED pine coniferous tree + yard enclosed land planted with trees] n. pine forest: 1910 Pine-yard, as the pine woods are locally called (Northrop ...
  • pink
     [DJE, the butter bird or roseate stilt; OED, the chaffinch; from its cry] n. a bird (sp?): 1977 red-winged blackbirds, pinks, and a host of ...
  • pink conch
    [from the bright pink lip of its shell] n. a variety of conch, Strombus sp.: 1977 Some shells, such as.. .pink conchs (Albury 26). (Black) ...
  • pinky
    [cf. US Black Pinkie a very attractive light-skinned colored girl (Sebastian 1934:288) and pink boy white male (Folb); OED pinky tinged with pink] adj. (of ...
  • pin-mouth
    [from the shape of its mouth] n. a fish (sp?) resembling the needlefish. (Mayag.) ...
  • pious
    [OED, characterized by loyal affection; now rare or arch.] adj. (of animals) gentle: 1963 These cows wouldn't hurt nobody. They is very pious creatures (Coffman ...
  • pipe-horse
    [cf. DAE pipe-fish a sea horse] n. a sea horse, Amphelikturus dendriticus: 1968 (Böhlke 181). (Exuma) ...
  • pipe-shank
    [from use of its hollow stem to make pipes] n. a plant, Leonurus sibiricus: 1920 (Britton 377). (Black) ...
  • pippie
    [cf. DHS pee-pee urine] n. penis (child's word). (Gen.) ...
  • pissimire
    [Brit. dial. East (Orton L30); US dial. North ADD; from smell when crushed] n. a biting ant (sp?). (Gen.) ...
  • piss-a-bed
    (White); pissy bush (Cat); pissy-bed, pee-a-bed (Andros) [W Car. piss-a-bed (Cassia sp.) "from its diuretic properties" DJE; OED idem dandelion obs, except dial.] n. a ...
  • piss-cutter
    [etym?] n. a person who speaks ill of a friend. (San Sal., Rum Cay) ...
  • pissing cloud
    [cf. SHITTING CLOUD; by euphemism] n. whitish spots on the skin. (Mayag) ...
  • piss-off
    [DHS, to depart] n. an insult: He's a piss-off (Eleu.). (Black) ...
  • piss-tail
    adj. impudent: That piss-tail thing think he is man (Eleu.). (Black) ...
  • pissy
    [cf. Brit, slang pissed drunk, US slang pissed (off) angry] adv. very (drunk or angry only?): 1971 I got pissy drunk (McCartney 44). De boy ...
  • Pistable
     adj. Episcopal: We did blonks to de Pistable Church (Cat). ...
  • pitch
    v. 1. [OED, to lurch (as of a ship)] (of peo-ple) to sway: 1966 Booky pitching and dancing (Crowley 88). (Black) 2. [Gul. idem (Parsons ...
  • pitch a stink
    [cf. US Black pitch a fit or raise is stink idem (Walker 1956:254); also pitch a bitch idem (Gold)] v. phr. to object vehemently; to ...
  • pity: your ma mussy pity dog
    pity: your ma mussy pity dog [from belief that a child will resemble what its mother pitied when pregnant] phr. an insult. cf. MARK (Black) ...
  • pity-ma-dick
    (Black); piramidig [cf. DM pirarnadig idem "echoic for the bird's cry"] n. a bird, the nighthawk (Chordeiles minor): 1880 Little night-hawk„ .Pira-mi-dink (Cory 107). 1910 ...
  • place
    [cf. racing place third] v. to occupy a particular position in a sequence: I am from a family of seven children, placing the fifth child ...
  • plague
    v. 1. [Brit. colloq, OED; US dial. DARE) to annoy constantly: 1895 Dis snake use' to plague de tree (Edwards 70). 1936 Ma wuz plague ...
  • plait
    See PLAT. ...
  • plait pole
    /plat powl/ [W Car.; from plaiting or intertwining of ribbons) n. Maypole: 1976 In the centre of the parade ground, there was the pole to ...
  • plane boat
    n. one of the ferry boats going from the cays to the airport on the main island, Abaco: 1977 plane boat: a ferry (Albury 157). ...
  • plant
    [Trin. idem (Broadbridge 1980:11); by passivization] v. to be planted: Peas and beans does plant together (Cat). ...
  • plantation
    [W Car.; OED, an assemblage of growing plants of any kind which have been planted] n, a small field for crops cleared in the scrubland: ...
  • planting stick
    n. a long pointed stick used to make holes to plant seeds, etc.: 1966 (Otterbein 25). You take you little planting stick and you juck ...
  • plat, plait
    /plat/ [Car.; Gul. idem (Davis 1914:245); from Brit, plait braid OED; US dial. South ADD) v. to braid, especially to braid or weave dried strips ...
  • plate fish
    [from its shape] n. a flat fish (sp?) resembling the flounder. (Gen.) ...
  • plate rock
    [OED, slate] n. flat rock with a thin soil covering: 1905 This soil occurs where the rock has weathered, leaving the surface in the condition ...
  • play
    in the idioms: play 'bout (Andros); play 'round (Eleu.) [OED play to divert oneself] phr. to stand about conversing on a street corner (usually of young ...
  • play-play
    [Car.; cf. Sra, pré-pré in fun WST; SA play-play make-believe] adj. imaginary, pretend: I making doll-baby dress. This a play-play sewing machine (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • play the blocks
    [cf. BLOCKS; Australian do the block to lounge on the promenade OEDS I) v. phr. to stand about conversing on a street corner (usually of ...
  • plenty
    [Car.; OED colloq. intensifier: plenty large] adv. a great deal: 1936 I like it plenty (Dupuch 62). (Black) ...
  • plenty-plenty
    [DJE idem; by reduplication of PLENTY] adv. a great deal (emphatic). (Black) ...
  • plop
    [cf. Cayman plop-corn pop-corn (Fuller 68); OED plop sound of falling into water) v. to pop; to burst, making a noise. (Black) ...
  • plop-eye
    adj. 1. [cf. OED pop-eye bulging or prominent eye + PLOP pop) having large eyes. (Black) 2. [cf. BIG-EYE] greedy. (Eleu.) ...
  • ploppers
    [cf. PLOP, from sound of bursting buds or flotation chambers] n. 1. a plant, Bryophyllum pinnatum. = LIFE LEAF, LEAF-OF-LIFE, LIVE- FOREVER, PORPUS (Black) 2. a seaweed, Sargassum sp. (White) ...
  • pluck
    [cf. Haitian plimen to pluck, have inter­course HCEFD; cf. DAS pluck to have sexual intercourse with; a thinly veiled rhyming euphe­mism for the taboo fuck] v. ...
  • plum berry
    n. a tree, Byrsonima lucida, with small reddish, sour fruit : 1977 (Patterson 71). = GUANA PLUM, SWEET MARGARET (Black) ...
  • plump
    [from plum by hypercorrection) n. plum: We have... hog plumps growing in the yard (COB) (Black)  ...
  • plum rose
    [from plum-like fruit, which taste of rosewater (Cassidy p.c.)] n. a shrub, Eugenia jambos: 1972 (Durrell 86). ROSE APPLE (Nassau) ...
  • pocaution
    [from precaution, by loss of /r/] n. contraceptive: Let your daughter know that there are pocotion in any pharmacy or hospital (COB). (Gen.) ...
  • pock, pork
    /pohk/ [cf. OED puck to hit or strike obs. except dial.] v. 1. to hit with around object such as a ball or a stone. (Black) 2. ...
  • poco-poco
    [Car.; cf. Am. Sp." Cómo te va?" "Pa­co a poco": "How's it going?" (i.e. "How arcyou?") "Little by little" (i.e. "I'm making it—one day at a time"); cf. ...
  • poinciana
     [from De Poinci, 17th century governor of part of the Fr. West Indies W3] n. a large tree, Poinciana regia, with brilliant reddish orange flowers. ...
  • poison bush
    [OED different sp.] n. a shrub, Grim­meodendron eglandulosum: 1920 (Britton 232).= YOUNG MANCHIONEEL (Black) ...
  • poison cherry
    [DJE idem; from its small red fruit] n. a shrub, Rhacoma crossopetalum: 1920 (Brit­ton 248). (Inagua) ...
  • poison ivory
    [cf. OED poison ivy] n. a trailing plant (sp?) with an irritating sap. (Black) ...
  • poison toad
    [see quot.] n. a fish: 1905 Scorpaena plumieri, S. grandicornis (called poison toad) be­cause of the painful wounds they inflict with their spines (Shattuck 317). cf. ...
  • poisonwood
    [from its poisonous sap and fruit] n. a tree, Metopium toxiferum: 1731 (Catesby 40). 1895 pison-wood tree (Edwards 64). = GALL WOOD (Gen.) ...
  • poke
    [OED, to thrust intrusively] n. a lower-class person who tries to ingratiate himself with people of higher social standing (derogatory). (Gen.) ...
  • poke Death with a stick
    v. phr. to court danger; tempt fate. (Black) ...
  • poker
    [OED poke to jab] n. a kind of large mos­quito (sp?): Down along that track road them poker does bug me every time (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • pokish
    [cf. "to poke one's nose in other people's business") adj. inquisitive. (Black) ...
  • pole
    n. a pool stick. (Black) ...
  • police
    [Car.; cf. Sp. policia idern ; dial. in Brit. CSD, and US DAE] n. a policeman: 1966 He was a police (Crowley 97). (Gen.) ...
  • policeman
    (San Sal., White); police bird (Eleu.) [from its plumage, suggesting a policeman's uniform (Cassidy p.c.)] n. the male red-winged blackbird, Agelaius phoeniceus: 1972 (Paterson 163). = BLACK BIRD ...
  • polt, pault
    /pohlt/ [cf. Brit. dial. East polt pelt DSS] v. to pelt with stones: 1971 Young boys would throw rocks or "pault" them (McCartney 1). (Gen.) ...
  • pommy-sicker
    See BANNYSINKEL ...
  • pond
    n. a salt pan, a pond into which sea water is run and left to evaporate to form salt: Old woman like dat go in ...
  • pond apple
    [OED Anona laurifolia 1890→; from its marshy habitat and apple-like fruit] n. a tree, Annona aquatica: 1835 (Journal 47). = CORK WOOD, WILD CUSTARD APPLE (GM) ...
  • pond bush
    [DAE different sp.] n. a shrub, Peteveria alliacea. = GARLIC WEED, OBEAH BUSH, POOR-MAN STRENGTH, FOUR MAN STRENGTH, GUINEA-HEN WEED, STRONG-MAN'S WEED (Black) ...
  • pond crab
    n. a crab, Cardisoma guanhumi =WHITE CRAB, WHITEY 2 (Black) ...
  • pond grass
    n. a rush-like plant (sp?): (Fernander 1980). (Long) ...
  • pond top
    from its marshy habitat + TOP] n. a palm, Sabal palmetto, whose leaves are used for thatch and STRAW WORK: 1920 (Britton 60). 1936 Pon' top: straw of ...
  • pond top hat
    /póhn tohp hat/ [POND TOP + hat] n. a hat made of STRAW1: 1936 (I) fan muh troubled brow wid pon' top hat (Dupuch 58). ...
  • pone
    [Car.; US dial. South pone corn-bread ADD; from Algonquian (Amerindian) apan baked W3; cf. also Car. Sp. pon id em (Alvarez Nazario 1974: 278)] n. a baked pudding: 1978 ...
  • ponga, pawnga
    [etym?] n. the female genitals: 1966 (Crowley 24). ...
  • pony
    adj. [cf. POOR perhaps influenced by puny] (of people) thin. (Andros) ...
  • pony (2)
    n. [etym?] dried nasal mucus. -= TONY (White) ...
  • poo
    [euphemism for poop] n. 1. buttocks. (Eleu.) 2.   the rump, as of a fowl. (Long) 3.   anus. (Nassau, San Sal.) 4.   [cf. Atlantic pupú idem (Hancock 1969:60) and Haitian poupou idem HCEFD] faeces. ...
  • poomp
    [cf. Belize pum idem (Dayley); cf. OED poop idem, dial. & vulgar] v. to break wind; to emit intestinal gas. (Gen.) ...
  • poop
    [OED the aftermost part of a ship; the hinder part of a man or animal obs.→1706] n. the buttocks. (Inagua) ...
  • poop-poop
    (Nassau, White); pop-pop (Eleu.) [cf. W Car. pok-pok idem; W3 put-put idem; from the sound of the engine] n. a slow passenger boat. ...
  • poor
    /poh/ [OED, lean and feeble from ill feeding] adj. (of people) thin: He liking that poor girl live over by Rodney-dem (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • Poor Joe, Po&#39; Joe, pojo
    /pów jow/ [W Car.; Gul. idem from Vai po dzo heron (Turner 199) + folk etym?] n. the green heron, Butorides virescens: 1910 Ardea bahamensis. ...
  • poor-man blanket
     [because it keeps him warm without cost] n. the sun (term used by sailors). (Inagua) ...
  • poor-man strength
    [from its use as a tonic] n. a trailing plant, Peteveria alliacea. = POND BUSH, FOUR MAN STRENGTH, GARLIC WEED, GUINEA-HEN WEED, OBEAH BUSH, STRONG-MAN'S ...
  • poor mouth: cry (or talk) poor mouth
    [cf. Krio kray adop (cry hard-up) idem KED, US dial. South talk poor mouth idem ADD; cf. colloq. Canadian cry poverty (Winer p.c.); cf. Gaelic ...
  • pop
    v. [Car.; also US dial. South WEA, Black (Smiley 1919:371); OED, to burst with a pop] 1. ...
  • pop-eye John
    [from its prominent eyes] n. a variety of squirrelfish, Holocentrus sp.= BIG-EYE JOHN, JACK BRUSH (Andros, Exuma) ...
  • poppa
    See PAPA ...
  • poppers (1)
    [from sound of berries bursting] n. a shrub, Physalis angulata, with yellow berries: 1920 (Britton 381). cf. PLOPPERS (Black) ...
  • poppers (1)
    [from sound of berries bursting] n. a shrub, Physalis angulata, with yellow berries: 1920 (Britton 381). cf. PLOPPERS (Black) ...
  • poppers (2)
    [cf. W3 pop-up a fly ball hit without much force and usually caught easily by an infielder (baseball)] n. a game which consists of tossing ...
  • poppy-show
    [Car.; Brit. dial. 'puppet show' EDD] n. 1.a ridiculous exhibition: Beauty contests are only a poppy-show (COB). (Nassau) 2. a person who shows off, making ...
  • popular
    [US well known and liked] adj. notorious: Taxis are popular for speeding (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • porgy, porgie
    /póhgi/ [Car.; from Sp., Port. pargo sea bream DJE] n. a fish, Calamus sp.: 1731 porgy (Catesby 16). 1782 trumpet fish, porjes (Bruce 46). 1909 ...
  • porgie conch
    [etym?] n. a variety of conch (Strombus sp.): 1928 The Screw conch. . also the King, Queen, Twist, Porgie, and Lamb (Curry 107). (Gen.) ...
  • pork
    n. [cf. Belize pook pork, vagina (Dayley); DHS pork women as food for men's lust; US Black pig meat whore (Major)] 1. a young, sexually ...
  • pork
    See POCK ...
  • pork-and-doughboy
    [W Car, different sp. with edible fruit; cf. DOUGHBOY] n. 1 a tree, Acacia acuifera: 1920 (Britton 160). (Black) 2.a tall, round cactus (sp?). (White) ...
  • pork bush, poke bush
    n. pokeweed, Phytolacca icosandra: 1920 (Britton 135). = DULFER'S HAM (Black) ...
  • pork loaf
    [see quot.] n. cassava bread baked with strips of pork: 1934 Eleuthera boasts of a special Sunday morning breakfast...It is baked in the outside ovens ...
  • porky
    [cf. pokey vagina in Guy. (Rickford 1971:8), Vir. (Seaman); from PORK + -y (diminutive)] n. the female genitals (child's word). (Exuma, Nassau) ...
  • porpus leaf
    [from PLOPPERS by /l, r/ alternation, metathesis, and devoicing of final -s; possibly in­fluenced by porpoise] n. a plant, Bryophyllum pinnaturn.= LIFE LEAF (Andros) ...
  • porpy, porper
    (Eleu.); puppus (San Sal.) [from Old Fr. porpois lit, hog-fish; cf. Scots porpy idem CSD] n. the porpoise, a marine mammal: 1895 De firs' fish ...
  • portest
    [cf. OED protest proclaim obs. →1644] v. to proclaim: 1966 They portest (proclaim) Jack horn to be the Marbel golden teeth (Crowley 116). (Eleu., San Sal.) ...
  • possum
    [cf. pus-gut idem] n. a small variety of swell-fish, Canthigaster rostrata? (Adelaide) ...
  • posteriors
    [OED, the hinder parts of the body; euphemism] n. the male genitals. (Eleu.) ...
  • pot: sit on the pot
    v. phr. to wait until a visitor has left before serving food. (Eleu.) ...
  • pot-a-full
    n. potful: 1966 She dress a pot-a-full of fish (Crowley 106). (San Sal.) ...
  • potato
    n. 1. [Car.] the sweet potato, as opposed to the IRISH POTATO. (Gen.)= BATATA 2. [from shape] the developing breasts of a pubescent girl: She cuttin' potato (Inagua). She ...
  • potato bread
    [from POTATO sweet potato + bread] n. a baked pudding made of grated sweet potato, spices, etc.: We had that to eat with the potato ...
  • potato wood
    [ etym?] n. a tree, Ateramnus lucidus: 1977 (Patterson 27). Walking stick carved from potato-wood root (sign in Wyannie Malone Museum). = CRABWOOD 4 (Inagua, ...
  • potcake (1)
    [from its caking on the pot] n. burnt or very crisp food adhering to the cooking vessel, considered a delicacy: 1973 Scrape out the potcake (Missick 16). cf. ...
  • potcake (2)
    [connection to POTCAKEI unclear] n. 1. any mongrel dog of no definable breed. (Gen.) 2. a short-haired, light-brown dog of mixed breed which is very common ...
  • pot gravy
     [cf. US pan gravy thickened sauce] n. the liquid left after meat has been cooked. (Black) ...
  • pot-hole
    [cf. Brit, dial. idem, a pit in the ground OED; see quot. for folk etym.] n. a deep, cylin­drical hole in rock, about a foot ...
  • pound-cake bush, pancake bush
    [ etyrn?] n. a plant, Parthenium hysterophorus: 1971 (Rabley 31). 1979 Pound-cake bush is used as a wash for sores (Levanity 2). =WHITE HEAD 2, WILD WORMWOOD (Black) ...
  • prance
    [cf. Gut. idem, to rear up (Parsons 1923: 35); cf. OED, of a horse: to spring and bound in high mettle; to rise by springing from ...
  • pra-pra
    [Car.; from Twi práp'ra gather, sweep DJE] v. to throw (one's opponent) by cross-step in wrestling: 1936 He grab dis feller by he foot an' pra-pra ...
  • pray for (a baby)
    v. phr to christen (a baby): The baby die before it even pray for (Acklins). (Black) ...
  • prays, praise
     [W Car.; cf. Gul, praise-meeting prayer meeting (Gonzales 1922:319); cf. OED pray prayer obs. → 1654] n. prayer(s): 1817 I do earnestly offer Up my ...
  • Pregnancy and Birth
    Bahamians love children; it is considered a great misfortune to be BARRENT or a BOAR STAG. A man who fathers a child every year is ...
  • present
    /prézant/ [W Car.; cf. Brit. dial. North idem, 'to make presents' obs.→1617 EDD ] v. to give (a gift): He present her a gift (Nassau). He ...
  • president
    [also Nigerian English: "Esusu. ..under a president" (Johnson 1921:119)] n. the person holding the ASUE: 1978 (Bethel 4). (Mayag., San Sal.) ...
  • press (1)
    adj. [cf. OED, to cause a feeling of pressure, distress obs. →1738] bloated from overeating: He press (Eleu.). --n. [cf. PRESS1  adj. and Scots press pressure CSD] intestinal ...
  • press (2)
    [cf. Vir. press hair hair that has been straight­ened with a hot comb (Roy); US Black idem (Folb); cf. Haitian pare repasser, defriser (che­veux) HCEFD] v. ...
  • press the block
    [cf. PLAY THE BLOCKS idem) v. phr. to stand about on a street corner conversing (especially of young males in groups). (Nassau, Eleu.) ...
  • pretty
    [W Car.; OED, handsome arch., Brit. dial. North, Scots idem EDD) adj. handsome (no con­notation of being delicate): She said: "I got me one pretty boy [of ...
  • pretty-ma-dick
    See PITY-MA-DICK. ...
  • prickle
    [W3, a small spine or thorn] n. 1. a patch of thorny plants: 1918 Don't put me in the prickle, else I will die (Parsons 15). (Gen.) ...
  • prickle grass
    [W Car.] n. a coarse grass with burs: 1920 Prickle grass. . .Nazia alienna (Britton 14). You should wear tennis; got plenty prickle grass on ...
  • prickle pear
    [Gul. idem (Writers' Program 1940: 100); OED idem→1836] n. the prickly pear cac­tus, Opuntia sp., with a flat, jointed stem and pear-shaped fruit, often used for food. ...
  • prickle pine
    [MCC idemj n. the bastard cedar tree, Guazuma ulmifolia. (Eleu.) ...
  • prickly bush
    n. a shrub, Anthacanthus spinosus: 1920 (Britton 403). (White) ...
  • prickly tree
    n. a tree, Terminalia spinosa: 1910 (Northrop 171). = BRIAR TREE (Inagua, White) ...
  • prim
    [cf. DJE prims idem; OED prim to show self affectedly demure obs.→I706] v. 1. (usually of girls) to show off; to walk with a sexually provoc­ative gait: ...
  • primit
     /prímit/ (Nassau); plymouth /plímit/ (An­dros) [from permit by metathesis and Il, r/ alter­nation] n. a fish, the permit (Trachinotus pom­pano). ...
  • princess
    n. prince: 1918 She marry to de princess (Parsons 36). (Mayag.) ...
  • prise
    [from praise, perhaps influenced by prize] v. to admire, praise: 1918 Everybody come up an' prised de baby (Parsons 140). (Black) ...
  • produce
    /pradyúws/ [OED formerly stressed prodúce, like the verb] n. produce; vegetables: 1982 The wholesale produce market has enough to­matoes (ZNS-TV). (Nassau, Crooked) ...
  • professor of plants
    [W Car, professor idem; OED professor one who makes a profession of any art or science] n. a person skilled in BUSH MEDICINE. (Black) ...
  • prog, progue (1)
    /prohe [Car.; cf. OED, v.t. to beg obs. → 1656; v.i. to search about, esp. for food; Brit. dial. North, Mid idem EDD] v.t. to beg (for something): Where ...
  • prog, progue (2)
    v.t. [DJE idem; OED, to prod, probe; Scots idem CSD] 1. to prod; to poke something out of a place: He prog de fish out de ...
  • program
    n. a CONCERT of hymns in a church to raise funds: He had a program. . .down to Gospel Hall (Cat). (Black) ...
  • proper: the proper
    [OED, excellent arch, or vulgar] n. the right way of doing something; the real thing; the best (youth slang): Ruthnell hair does look the proper, na! ...
  • prop-pry
    See PRA-PRA. ...
  • prosperous
    [OED, thriving (financially only after 1638)1 adj. 1. thriving (not restricted to finance). (Black) 2. (of people) fertile; having many children. (Black) ...
  • prostitute
    [OED idem obs. →1747] vi. to become or be a prostitute (non-reflexive, absolute): The lack of employment causes mothers to prostitute in order to make a ...
  • proud flesh
    [OED overgrown flesh around a wound; US dial. idem DARE] n. a painful grow­ing of the gums over the teeth. (Inagua, San Sal.)  ...
  • prove
    [Gul. idem (Parsons 1923:9); OED, arch. except in technical uses] v. to test' 1966 "For we to prove how if this fish poison," he say, "let's cut this ...
  • Providence
    [see quot] n. early name of the island of New Providence (Oldmixon 1741). 1880 Cap­tain William Sayle... was driven into the harbour of Nassau by stress of ...
  • provision ground
    [W Car.; OED idem "in the West Indies"; cf. GROUND field] n. a field for crops: 1966 They brought him some okra puddings, sapodilly out the ...
  • provision land
    [DAE idem, good land for crops 18251 n. rich, black loam used for raising crops: 1905 The Bahama Black Loam, or "provision" land, as it ...
  • prune legs
    [cf. RAISIN-LEG idem; from appearance of dark sores] n. a person with many sores on his legs. (Andros) ...
  • pry (stick), prize-stick
    [cf. OED pry dial. and US (shortened from prize, prise. . .through confusing the final consonant with the -s of the third pers. sing. pres....to raise or ...
  • publish: the publish
    [cf. DAE publish to publish the banns of marriage] n. the public notification of marriage posted on a church door: 1966 (Ot­terbein 46). (Gen) ...
  • pudding fish
    [cf. PUDDING-WIFE] n. a fish, Sparus radiatus: 1788 (Schoepf 277). (San Sal) ...
  • pudding-wife
    [cf. OED idem Platyglossus radiatus "also called pudding-fish" 1734→; cf. also Gul. pudi a wide, flat, scaleless saltwater fish having a spotted tail and resembling the ...
  • puddle of children
    [cf. OED puddle confused heap dial.] n. many children in one family. (Andros, Elm) ...
  • pug-gut
    [cf. OED pot-gutted, possibly converging with pug short, squat and Kongo mpongo fatness (Turner 149)] n. a protruding belly: With his pug-gut look like he ...
  • pulka mazulka
    [from polka + mazurka, two lively Polish dances] n. a fast dance no longer per­formed: 1978 (Bethel 173). (Nassau, San Sal.) ...
  • pull
    [OED, to lower or depress in health] v. (of illnesses) to cause to lose weight: Sickness is pulling her down (White). (Gen.) —adj. drawn, weak, gaunt (used in predicate posi­tion): ...
  • pull-and-haul-back
    [from its prickles, which catch the passerby] n. a spiny tree (sp?). cf. PULL-BACK (White) ...
  • pull-back
    [cf. PULL-AND-HAUL-BACK) n. a climb­ing woody vine, Pisonia aculeata: 1920 (Britton 132). = HAUL BACK (Inagua, White) ...
  • pullet
    [OED, a young hen] n. (of birds) the female: 1895 de pullet dove (Edwards 100). (San Sal.) ...
  • pull it
    [cf. colloq. pull it off carry out success­fully] v. phr. to cope (with a situation): I don't like the hospital. And I pull it that week. ...
  • pull to you
    [cf. pull row in Vir. (Roy), Cayman (Kohlman 1969:26)] v. phr. turn to port (instruc­tion to man rowing boat): 1977 (Albury 66). cf. SHOW FROM YOU ...
  • pull train
    [cf. US Black pull a train (on a woman) idem (Kochman 1972:163); DAS pull a train (of a girl) to have sexual intercourse with several ...
  • pump
     [from earlier public water pumps on streets) n. a water faucet; a tap: The pump [in the kitchen] leakening down to the bottom part (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • pumpkin
    /póngkin/ [Car.] n. a squash (Cucurbita sp.) With green rind and orange flesh. (Gen.) ...
  • pump-up boat
    n. an inflatable rubber dinghy. (Inagua, Mayag) ...
  • punch
    [W Car.; cf. Sp. ponche idem] n. a beverage made from rum mixed with a raw egg: 1976 Punches required the use of eggs (Eneas 41). ...
  • punish
    [Atlantic; probably by passivization, but cf. Twi bere punish, suffer (Aboagye p.c.)) v. to suffer: He punish to do that [i.e. it caused him pain] (Nassau). (Black) ...
  • punk
    [Gut. idem (Stewart 1974:41); cf. OED, prostitute obs. →1785: US young gangster, hood­lum; a youth used as a homosexual partner... prison parlance W3] n. 1. a ...
  • punu-kunuku
    /pùnu-kunúwku/ [cf. DJE bunu­nunus, putu, tutu terms of endearment] n. mean­ing uncertain, probably a term of endearment: Go, my punu-kunuku (song from a folk tale). ...
  • pupfish
    [cf. DJE puppy-fish] n. a fish, Cyprinodon laciniatus: 1968 (Böhlke 133). (Andros, Adelaide) ...
  • puppus
    See PORPY ...
  • puppy-foot
    [DAS puppy-dog feet idem; from simi­larity to foot-prints of a dog] n. (playing cards) the suit of clubs. (Nassau, Eleu) ...
  • puppy shark
    n. 1. [W Car. idem] a shark, Carchar­ius limbatus. (Gen.) 2. [cf. puppus porpose] the porpoise. (San Sal.) ...
  • puppy show
    See POPPY-SHOW ...
  • purchase
    [OED, leverage] n. sense of balance: The baby will get her purchase (Nassau). ...
  • pure
    [Car.; OED, nothing but] adj. nothing else but: They eat pure bread [i.e. with no other food] (San Sal.) cf. LONE (Black) ...
  • purge
    [OED, of a medicine: to empty (the stom­ach, bowels)] v. (of a corpse) to discharge from the mouth, nose, etc.: 1966 The marbel [dead one day] was ...
  • purgenut
    [from laxative effect of fruit] n. a tree (sp?) with nuts resembling peanuts. (Andros) ...
  • purple
     [OED, mixtures of red and blue] adj. (of skin color) very dark (not derogatory). cf. NAVY-BLUE BLACK (Black) ...
  • purple lily
    [OED different sp.] n. the oyster plant, Rhoeo discolor. = BOAT LILY (Andros, Adelaide) ...
  • pus leg
    n. a swollen leg with sores (associated with alcoholism). (Black) ...
  • pus-gut
    n. 2. [DAS pus-gut a fat-bellied man; cf. US dial, South pussy-gutted having a large abdo­men WEA, pursley gut or pussle gut idem WSC] a distended ...
  • pussley
    /pósli/ [W Car.; dial, form of purslane in Brit., US (DJE, OED)] n. an aromatic plant (sp?). (Gen.) ...
  • pussy-mouth
    [cf. OED pussy cat; cf. MOUTH mouth and chin] n. a receding chin. (Black) ...
  • pussy-seller
    [cf. DHS pussy female pudenda] n. prostitute (derogatory). (Black) ...
  • put
    [W Car.; cf. Sp. poner idem] v. absolute: to place: 1966 I doesn't put a sing if it doesn't require it (Crowley 138). (Black) ◊ Bahamian put requires no expression ...
  • put-back
    [OED idem 1697 only] n. setback; handi­cap: Poverty is not a disgrace but it is a hell of a put-back (COB). (Nassau) ...
  • put-put
    /put put/ [cf. W3 putt-putt idem] n. 1. a slow passenger boat. = POOP POOP (Inagua, Mayag.) 2. the engine of such a boat. (San Sal.) ...
  • putting in jail
    [cf. SAIL ring] n. phr. a game played with marbles: putting in jail. . .Three players shoot and try to hit each other's taw. If they ...
  • putting out the baby
     n. phr. a ceremony in which a newborn infant is presented to the family's relatives and neighbors; when it is nine days old, it is bathed ...
  • putty, pooty
    /púti/ [Gul. idem (Turner 272); foppish pronunciation in 18th century Brit. (Cassidy p.c.)] adj. pretty; 1918 Look at dis pooty gyirl (Parsons 13). 1936 putty soon ...
  • porg, pawg
    /pohg/ [cf. PORGIE] n. a fish, Iridio bivittatus. = BLUE RAINBOW, GILLEMBO, SLIPPERY DICK (Nassau) ...